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Full text of "Radio Electronics (September 1990)"

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO AM RADIO? 



^ 48783 




wctnancs 

rECHNOLOGY - VIDEO - STEREO - COMPUTERS - SERVICE 




BUILD THE 
LAWN RANGER 

Let a robot take the work 
out of cutting your lawn! 



BUILD R-E's 
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Add a high-tech look to any car 





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i*?^^:^- 

Our Telephone Line 
lets you restrict incoi... 
outgoing calls, and lots more! 



MICROWAVE 
TECHNOLOGY 

Early attempts at 
microwave generation 



tjxnMX CflR-Rr SORT xj. am 
75045GNRR5165MD93 D9 34 

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FLUKI 



September 1990Em 



mcinjiiScs^ 



Vol. 61 No. 9 




33 RE'S VOCAL STRIPPER 

Filter out the lead vocals from your favorite recordings, and dub in 



your own voice! 
Terry L. Weeder 

37 TELEPHONE LINE CONTROLLER 

Block out unwanted incoming and outgoing calls, and more! 
Mordechai Saad 

53 THE LAWN RANGER: PART 4 

It's time to get the lawn mowed! 
Raymond Rafaels 

61 RE'S DIGITAL DASHBOARD 

Build an array of digital gauges for your car. 
Ross Ortman 



KyKHii.'iiiRiilT 



DATA DISKS 

KICH SPEED 
DEVICE 
SELECTION 
FOR THE 90S 





47 DATA DISK: HIGH-SPEED DEVICE SELECTION 
FOR THE 'SO'S 

Electronic data processing makes it easy to find the right 
components for your applications. 
Ed Prestwood 

68 INTRODUCTION TO MICROWAVE TECHNOLOGY 

The focus is on early RF oscillators. 
Joseph J. Carr 

71 AM RADIO 

What does the future hold for the AM band? 
Gerry L. Dexter 



■H'lullil^yHlK 



BUILD RE'S 

DlGiTAL 

DASHBOARD 




88 COMPUTER CONNECTIONS 

Windows 3.0 and ToolBook 
Jeff Holtzman 



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6 VIDEO NEWS 

What's new in video, 
David LachenbrucK 

16 EQUIPMENT REPORTS 

Hewlett-Packard's 48SX 
scientific calculator. 

83 DRAWING BOARD 

Let's start on control circuitry. 
Robert Grossblatt 



75 HARDWARE HACKER 

Thoughts on perpetual motion. 
Don Lancaster 

81 AUDIO UPDATE 

An Audio Engineering Society 
conference report. 
Larry Klein 



00 Advertising and Sales 
Offices 

100 Advertising Index 
7 Ask RE 

97 Free Information Card 

12 Letters 

101 Market Center 
26 New Lit 

22 New Products 

4 What's News 



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ON THE COVER 



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WHATEVER HAPPENED TO AW liADlD? 



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^EEtrangifs. 




If there's a common thread that 
runs through the three seemingly 
disparate stories highlighted on this 
month's cover, it would have to be 
the notion of control — whether at 
home, at work, or at play. Our Tele- 
phone Line Controller Csee page 37) 
is an obvious example, allowing you 
to block out any calls, either incom- 
ing or outgoing, that you deem un- 
desirable. If your work (or your 
hobby) involves electronic design, 
the article on data disks that replace 
bulky, inconvenient cross-reference 
books will show you how to take bet- 
ter control of your valuable time. Turn 
to page 47 to find out how to speed 
up the device-selection process. 
And, just forfun, our Lead-Vocal Zap- 
per (see page 33) gives you some 
control over your stereo records, by 
letting you replace the lead vocal 
with your own voice. 



COMING NEXT MONTH 



THE OCTOBER ISSUE 
GOES ON SALE 
SEPTEMBER 4. 

BUILD A ROCKET ALTIMETER 

Get a second-by-second playback of the flight of model rockets. 

LASER-JET MEMORY CARD 

Add memory to HP's LaserJet printer, for a fraction of HP's price. 

SOME TV SETS CROSS THE BENCH 

Case histories in TV service have some lessons to teach. 

MICROWAVES: PART III 

A look at magnetron tubes. 



As a sarvice to readera, RADJO.EL&CTRONICS publishes available plans or information relating to newsworthy products, 
techniques and scientific and techt^clogical developments. Because pf possible variances in the quality and condition of 
fnaterials and workmanship used by readers. fliVDIO-ELECTf^ONICS disclaims any responsibility for the safe and praper 
functioning of reader-huilt projects t34sed upon or tmrr plans or information published in this magaiine. 

Since some of the equipment and circuitry descrihad in RADIO-ELECTROMIC& may niate to or be covered by U.S. patents. 
RADIO-ELECTBONICS disclaims any liability for the Infiinaement of such patents by the maVing. using, or saltirvg of any such 
equipment or circuitry, and suggests that anyone interested in such prajects consult a patent attorney. 

RADIO-ELECTRONICS, (ISSN 0033.7862) September 1990 Putjiished monthly by Gernsback Publications. Inc. EOO-B Bi- 
County Boulevard. Farmingdale. MY 11735 Second-Class Postage paid at Fanmingdsle. WY and additional mailing offices. 
Second-Class mail registration No. 97A2 authorized at Toronto. Canada. One-year subscription rate U.S.A. and possessions 
$17.97. Canada S23.97, aM other countries $26.97. All subscription orders payable in U.S.A. funds only, via international postal 
money order or checl^ drawn on a U.S.A. bank. Single copies $2.50. <^ 1990 by Gernsback Publications. Inc. All rights reserved. 
Printed in U.S. A 

POSTMASTERr Please send address changes to RADIO-ELECTRONICS. Subscription Depl.. Box 55115. Boulder, CO 
80321-5115, 

Astamped self-addressed envelope must accompany all submitted manuscripts and/or artwork or photographs if their return Is 

desired should they be rejected. We disclaim any responsibility for the loss or damage of manuscripts and/or artwork cr 
photographs while in our possession or otherwise. 



tlEctmrnES^ 



Hugo Gsm^ack (1 864-1967} bundar 
M. Haryey Gemsbftck. 
flditor-in-cihiaf,. emefitu^ 

Larry Stockier* EHR GET. 
iQditi)r-m-c^i«f find publisher 

EOrrORlAL DEPARTMENT 
BHan C, Ffinton, adttar 
Marc Spiwah, assaciate edrt&r 
DanieT Goodman^ technfeal editor 
K^m DunlA^vyf 

assistant technical e<Jilor 
TqH Scadutot assistant Aditor 
Jeffrey K. Kolbman 

computer editor 
Robert Grossbtatt, circuits editor 
Larry Klein, audio editor 
David Lachenbruch 

contributing editor 
Don Lancaster 

c<>ntributing editor 
Richard D. Fitch 

contributing editor 
Kathy Campbdll, editorial assistant 

ART DEPARTMENT 
Andre Duxant, art director 
Injae Lee, illuBtrator 
RusselE C. Truelson, illustrator 

PROOUCTtOlM DEPARTMENT 
Ruby Mr Yee, prDduction director 
Janice Bo^, 

editorial pnoductiofi 
Karen S. Tucker 

advertising production 
Rbrcella AmoroBO 

pitiduction assistant 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 
Jacqueline P. Cheese bo re 

Circulation director 
Wendy Alanko 

circulation analyst 
Theresa Lombardo 

circulation assistant 
MIcftele TorrillOt reprint bookstore 

Typography by Mates Graphics 
Cover photo by Diversified Photo 
Services 

Radio-Electronics is indexed in 
Appfffed Sc/ertce S Techno fogy Mdex 
and R^&d&fs Guide to Periodicst Uter- 
atune. 

Microfilm & Microfiche editions ere 
available^ Contact circulation depart- 
ment for details. 

Advertismg Sales Offices listed 
on page 95, 

Radio -Electronics Executive and 

Administrative Offices: 

1-516-293 3000, 
Subscnbor Customer Service: 

1-600-2B8-06S2, 
Order Entry for New SuhscHbers: 

1 S0O-e99-7t3d. 



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A review of the latest happenings in electronics. 



Ultra-pure silicon crystal 

Scientists at the Westinghouse 
Science & Technology Center (Pitts- 
burgh, PA) have produced a silicon 
crystal that is four times purer and 
significantly larger than any pre- 
viously reported silicon material. Im- 
purities comprise only a few parts in 
100 trillion, compared to more than 10 
parts in 100 trillion previously re- 
ported for one-inch diameter silicon 
crystals. The 22-pound cylindrical 
structure — called a boule — is more 
than a yard long and has a diameter of 
just over 3 inches. Its larger size 
makes it more practical for use in 
microelectronics circuits and de- 
vices. Crystal boules are sliced into 
wafers on which microelectronic cir- 
cuits and power semiconductor de- 
vices are fabricated. The West- 
inghouse crystal, which its de- 
velopers believe to be the purest 
silicon crystal ever made, is expected 
to play an important role in the man- 
ufacture of infrared detectors for 
space, defense, and environmental 
applications. The ultrapure silicon 
crystal was grown in Westinghouse's 
float-zone crystal-grov/th facility, the 
largest float-zone furnace in the U.S., 



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IN TEKTRONiX'S PLASMA-ADDRESSING PROCESS, the liquid-crystal material and a 
protective dielectric layer are sandwiched between two sheets of glass; the upper sheet 
contains the data electrodes patterned from the transparent indium-tin-oxide conductors 
and the bottom sheet provides channels that contain the plasma gas with two electrodes 
per channel. 



WESTINGHOUSE TECHNICIAN Don 
Nebel holds a single-crystal boule of sil- 
icon, believed to he the purist and largest 
ever produced. 



which can be adapted to produce 
boules up to four feet long and five 
inches in diameter. 

Plasma-addressing approach 
for high-resolution LCD's 

Tektronix researchers in Beaver- 
ton, Oregon, are developing a new 
plasma technique using a plasma 
switch to address the active matrix of 
a liquid-crystal display. Intended as an 
alternative to silicon thin-film tran- 
sistors CTFT's), which are successful 
in small, full-color displays but are dif- 
ficult to manufacture in a large array 
to address more than a million ele- 
ments, the new technique could sig- 
nificantly reduce the number of row 
drivers and make the displays easier 
to manufacture. 

The plasma technique uses gas- 
fiiled channels to address a variety of 



twisted-nematic and polymer-dis- 
persed liquid crystals. Confined 
ionized gas acts as an electrical 
switch; It conducts in an ionized state 
and becomes nonconductive when 
de-ionized, The degree of con- 
ductivity is determined by the number 
and mobility of the carriers in the gas. 
Tektronix says that the conductivity 
range of the gas (between con- 
ducting and nonconducting states) 
can be ten orders of magnitude. The/ 
have developed a plasma switch to 
take advantage of that property. 

The plasma switch is a three-termi- 
nal structure that uses a probe elec- 
trode on one terminal to alter the 
conductivity between the other two. 
A single switch can replace a whole 
row of silicon-based TFT's. 

Results of the initial demonstra- 
tions have been promising. R-E 




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CO 

o 



VIDEO NEWS 



What's new in the fast-changing video industry. 



DAVID LACHENBRUCH 



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• More Smm converts. The 8- 

millimeter camcorder format is gain- 
ing adherents in the United States at 
the expense of the full-size VHS and 
VHS-C Cfor compact) versions. Last 
month I reported the addition of an 
Smm camcorder to Zenith's line (Ra- 
dio-Electronics, August 1990). 
The latest brands to add Smm are 
even more significant. RCA, ow/ned 
by France's Thomson Consumer 
Electronics, has added four Smm 
camcorders to its line, and — perhaps 
even more tetling — Hitachi entered 
the Smm field with three camcorders. 
Hitachi's entry is particularly signifi- 
cant since it is a member of the origi- 
nal Japanese VHS group and the first 
to break ranks and market an Smm 
product under its ow/n name. In addi- 
tion to fielding Smm camcorders un- 
der its own brand name, Hitachi is 
manufacturing the camcorders for 
RCA's line. 

The VHS-C camp is replying with 
significant artillery, JVC has intro- 
duced several VHS-C recorders that 
rival Smm in compactness and light 
w/eight with excellent picture quality. 
Panasonic, Quasar, and Magnavox 
have added tiny, palm-size VHS-C 
models built by Matsushita. The 
VHS-C group says it will mount a 
major promotion campaign for the 
VHS-C format. 

Neither Zenith, Hitachi, nor Thom- 
son is abandoning VHS-C. All three 
will also have the compact semi-com- 
patible format as well. Zenith intro- 
duced several VHS-C models made 
by JVC, while Hitachi added a fold-up 
VHS-C camcorder for easy storage, 
and Thomson said its GE brand will 
have a model similar to Panasonic's 
Palmcorder, Although VHS-C is fight- 
ing back, Smm is dehnitely gaining 
gnaund in the camcorder wars, 

• TVRO's climbing again. 

After a major setback when signal 
scrambling started, home satellite 
dishes are on the upswing, according 
to the Satellite Broadcasting 8. Com- 
munications Association CSCBA), It 
puts the home-dish population at 
3,000,000 and estimates that sales 



are now running at 30,000 monthly, 
with total new installations expected 
to hit 400,000 this year, up from 
240.000 when the scrambling-induc- 
es slump began. 

• CDTV. That stands for "Com- 
modore Dynamic Total Vision," a new 
interactive system combining audio 
and video scheduled for introduction 
this fall. Developed by Noian Bush- 
nell, who originated the video game 
when he headed Atari, CDTV can 
play standard compact discs, the 
new Compact Discs -i- Graphics, or 
special CD-ROM interactive audio- 
visual programs. Included in the initial 
100 programs, to be sold for $30 to 
$100, will be a world atlas, a cook- 
book, encyclopedias, and games for 
both adults and children. The system 
uses the basic chips of the Com- 
modore Amiga computer— in fact, it's 
convertible to a computer with the 
addition of a keyboard. 

The basic system, to be priced at 
"less than $1,000" initially, is oper- 
ated by a wireless remote control, 
which lets users pan, zoom, and con- 
trol a cursor, among other things. It 
permits full motion on half the screen, 
or 15 frames per second for full- 
screen scenes, but Commodore 
says it is an "open architecture" sys- 
tem that can be converted to a full- 
screen, full-motion medium when a 
standard is approved by the Interna- 
tional Standards Organization, 

Philips and American Interactive 
Media previously announced that 
they will market their full-screen 
Compact Disc-Interactive (CD-I) sys- 
tem in 1991. A Philips official ex- 
pressed disappointment that the 
CDTV system was introduced before 
a standard was set. Consumer con- 
fusion could be the result. 

• Laserdiscs grow up. More 
than a decade after its introduction, 
the laserdisc is beginning to ap- 
proach mass-market status. Sales of 
discs exceeded 3,500,000 last year, 
and by midyear at least 16 brands 
were offering combination CD-laser- 
disc players or had announced their 



intentions to do so. Players are now, 
or will soon be, available under these 
brands: Denon, Fisher, Funai, Ken- 
wood, Magnavox, Marantz, Mit- 
subishi, NEC, Panasonic, Philips. 
Pioneer, QLissar, RCA, Sharp, Sony, 
and Yamaha, 

• Video vignettes. After lag- 
ging for three years, sales of 
projection -TV receivers in the first 
quarter of 1990 were up 25% from 
the same period in 19S9, and there 
were forecasts that 1990 would be 
the first record year for projection TV 
since 19S6. 

The picture-tube shortage that 
plagued the TV industry for the last 
few years seems to have ended, and 
an overcapacity of 3,000,000 to 
4,000,000 tubes is being forecast for 
1992, Companies that have ex- 
panded, built, or announced new 
color-tube plants in the United States 
since 1988 include Hitachi, Mat- 
sushita (Panasonic), Philips, Sony, 
Thomson (RCA and CjE), and 
Toshiba. 

• Digital VHS audio. JVC, the 
leader of Japan's VHS group, has de- 
veloped a compatible digital sound- 
track for VHS recordings. Although 
the system is at least a year from the 
market, the company has released 
specifications, presumably to encour- 
age other VHS manufacturers to go 
along. The system uses "depth multi- 
plex" recording, which permits video 
and audio signals to be recorded on 
different layers of the tape's magnetic 
coating. 

The recorded digital signal doesn't 
disturb the other soundtracks on the 
VHS tape — longitudinal mono and 
AFM stereo. The PCM audio signal 
uses a 48-kHz sampling frequency 
and 16-bit quantization, according to 
JVC. It will be used only on Super 
VHS recordings; if the technique 
were used on standard VHS it would 
overlap the luminance signal and 
cause interference, said JVC. The 
signal may be split into four channels 
for multilingual recording or other pur- 
poses. R-E 



ASK RE 



Write to Ask-RE, Radlo-Electonics, 500-B Bi-County Blvd., Farmingdale, NY 11735 



XT TO AT UPGRADE 

I recently upgraded my com- 
puter from an XT to an AT 
clone, and there seems to be 
some sort of problem with the 
disk drives. Whenever I try to 
read a disk from the AT on my 
XT, I set one of two kinds of 
errors. The most common one 
is that lots of read errors show 
up, but occasionally I can't 
read the disk at alt. I can't even 
get a directory to show up on 
the screen. What's going on? — 
F. Scher, Amsterdam, NJ 

You haven't given me all the par- 
ticulars of your computers, but I can 
make a good guess as to the source 
of the problem. The chances are that 
you got your AT with a 1.2-MB 5/4 
inch drive and your XT has a 360K 
drive. The two drives look very much 
alike on the outside, but there's a big 
difference internally In order to un- 
derstand what's causing your first 
problem, let's talk a bit about the 
basic difference between the drives. 

The original 360K floppies have 
two sides with 40 tracks each, and 
each track has nine sectors. The 1.2- 
MB disks were organized a bit dif- 
ferently to get the increased amount 
of storage. The high-density disks 
have 80 tracks on two sides, and 
each track is divided into 15 sectors. 
Since you've got twice as many 
tracks and 60% more sectors, you 
can store more data on the disk. If 
you do the arithmetic, you'll see that 
the numbers work out correctly. 

It makes sense that something had 
to be done to the original drives to 
allow them to hold so much more 
information. And it's what was done 
to the drives that's causing both of 
your problems. 

Disk drives are essentially the 
same as tape recorders. They have a 
read/write head, and they record in- 
formation on magnetic media (the 
disk surface). When the number of 
tracks was doubled, the distance be- 
tween tracks was halved (makes 
sense), and doing that increased the 
chances of crosstalk between the 
tracks. 



The problem was solved by reduc- 
ing the write current on high-density 
drives. Since the signal was much 
lower, the unwanted noise from near- 
by tracks was reduced. In order to 
read the desired tracks, however, the 
read gain was also increased. The 
system worked well (and still does), 
but it was necessary to change the 
composition of the recording medium 
in order to make the system reliable. 
There's a real, physical difference be- 
tween 360K and 1 .2-MB disks, and 
each can only be used for its intended 
purpose, 

Ifyou wanttousea 1,2-MB drive to 
write to a 360K disk, you have to use 
a disk made for 360K operation. Both 
the number of tracks and the number 
of sectors can be changed in soft- 
ware. When you issue the command 
FOR MAT A:/4, you re telling the soft- 
ware to make the head put forty 
tracks and nine sectors on the disk — 
you'll be formatting a 360K floppy 
disk. 

What's causing your problem is 
that while the software can force the 
drive to do the corr'ect number of 
tracks and sectors, it can't do any- 
thing about the write current — that's 
an internal adjustment on the drive 
and the software can't do a thing 
about it. 

When you write a 360K disk on a 
high-density drive, the information is 
going to be correctly organized on 
the disk but the recorded level will be 
very low. Since the 360K drive has its 
read gain set for a higher recorded 
level, the drive often has trouble read- 
ing the disk and that's the first prob- 
lem you're having. 

The second problem you're hav- 
ing — not being able to read the disk at 
all — is probably because you're trying 
to read a 1.2-MB flopp/ in the 360K 
drive. That can't be done at ail. 

The solution to your problems is 
through hardware, and the cheapest 
way to do it is to add a 360K drive to 
the AT Adding a 1.2-MB to your XT 
will undoubtedly mean you'd need a 
new disk controller as well, and 
there's no reason to spend the extra 
cash. 



COMMON-CATHODE DRIVERS 

I'm building a circuit that 
uses a 4511 to drive a seven- 
segment LED display. Every- 
thing is fine but the chip is de- 
signed to drive only common- 
cathode displays and I have a 
box of common-anode dis- 
plays. Is there any way I can 
use these instead of having to 
go out and buy a bunch of com- 
mon-cathode displays? I 
asked the person in the store 
about this and he said there 
was no way it could be done. 
You're my last hope. — N, Rofe, 
New Brunswick, NJ 

Although you're not supposed to 
do it. there's always a way to do that 
kind of thing. The person in the store 
who told you that it was impossible 
has, in kind words, a very limited 
imagination. 

The 4511 is designed to directly 
drive a common-cathode display, but 
using it to drive a common-anode dis- 
play means that you'll have to add a 
transistor as shown in Fig. 1 . The tran- 
sistor is working as a simple inverter, 
and just about any small signal PNP 
transistor should be able to handle 
the amount of current you 'II need, Re- 



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FIG. 1— THE 4511 IS DESIGNED to directly 
drive a common- cathode display but, by 
adding a transistor as shown here, you 
can use it to drive a common-anode dis- 
play. 

member the rule: Better to underrate 
parts than to overrate them. 

You may find the schematic shown 
in Fig, 2 to be useful as well. Even 
though the 4511 can directly drive a 
common-cathode display, it has (as 
do all display drivers) a maximum cur- 
rent that it can deliver at the outputs. 



CO 

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■0 



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DO 

o 



That causes a problem when you try 
to drive really big displays or even 
incandescent bulbs. 

Putting a transistor at the output 
switches the burden of powering the 
display from the chip to the transistor. 
If you need more current just add a 



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FIG. 2— EVEN THOUGH THE 4511 can di- 
rectly drive a common-cathode display, 
you may have to add a transistor to the 
output. That allows you to drive really big 
displays or even incandescent bulbs, 

chunkier transistor. The solution is 
really that simple. 

Of course you have to keep in mind 
that the 4511 is a CMOS part and it 
can't be expected to deliver enough 
current to trigger heavy-duty tran- 
sistors. If you ever want to do some- 
thing like that, you'll have to build an 



intermediate transistor stage to bring 
the output of the 451 1 up to the level 
of the output transistor. But, for driv- 
ing standard common-anode dis- 
plays that typically want a maximum 
of about 20 mA per segment, that 
circuit should solve the problem with- 
out any difficulty, 

DIGITAL AMPLIFICATION 
I've built a circuit to accept 
data from a temperature sen- 
sor but tKe input signal is a bit 
too low to go through my A-to- 
D converter. I don't want to 
have to add analog circuitry to 
the design so is there any easy 
way to amplify the incoming 
signal with digital IC's? — A. 
Dolan, Belmar, NJ 

Once upon a time there was no way 
to do that, but your problem can be 
solved with the addition of a couple of 
CMOS inverters. You may have to 
add an IC to the board but, if you've 
got three spare inverters around, you 
can use them. 

The 4049 is a good choice for this 
application since it can handle higher 
power levels and is perfect to use if 
you've got to do any sort of voltage 



\h 



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/OME& 



FIG. 3— The 4049 CAN HANDLE high 
power levels and is perfect for any sort of 
voltage translation. The amplifier will give 
you a gain of 10 with an input impedance 
ofoveramegohm. 

translation. As shown in Fig, 3, the 
amplifier will give you a gain of 10 with 
an input impedance of over a 
megohm. It doesn't require any kind 
of special layouts and should work 
without a problem. If you add a 4049 
remember to do something with the 
unused inverter inputs. 

Although you can easily build the 
circuit, and it will do the job, I don't 
understand why you don't build a 
small single-transistor amp to do the 
same job, I don't know what the 
characteristics of your input signal 
are but I'm sure you could easily de- 
sign a simple transistor amp to pro- 
vide the gain you need. R-E 



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LETTERS 



Write to Letters, Radio-Electronics, 500-B Bi-County Blvd., Farmingdale, NY 11735 



o 

< 



DESOLDERING DEVICES 

I'm writing in response to Mr Per- 
due s letter that appeared in the May 
1990 issue of Radio- Electronics. 

(He was responding to a previously 
published letter that concerned IC re- 
moval.) I take extreme exception to 
his general statement that the use of 
desoldering braid is "the only one 
approved by government organiza- 
tions." I work for a government or- 
ganization that regards the use of 
desoldering braid as a last resort! As 
a matter of fact, the U.S. government 
approves several methods of both 
soldering and desoldering compo- 
nents on printed-circuit boards. 

One of the appnaved methods of 
desoldering IC's is to use a motorized 
vacuum device, such as a "Pace Kit." 
Of course, that method requires spe- 
cialized training, and the cost of such 
a device would be prohibitive to the 
average home technician. Next on 
the list is the mechanical vacuum de- 
vice, commonly known as the "solder 
sucker." That item is available at most 
electronics parts stores. To use it, 
simply cock it and then heat the joint 
to be desoldered with a low-wattage 
iron. As soon as the solder begins to 
flow, place the tip of the solder-sucker 
vacuum over, and in physical contact 
with, the joint, and press the trigger 
button. When the solder sucker has 
tripped, remove both the iron and the 
vacuum immediately. Check the joint 
to make sure that all the solder was 
removed. If not, simply repeat the 
procedure. 

A few words of caution: First, use a 
low-wattage (10-25 watts) soldering 
iron at all times, to prevent overheat- 
ing the IC and causing internal 
damage. A temperature-controlled 
iron is even better Next, when work- 
ing with IC's — particularly CMOS 
types — always use a ground strap (a 
metal wrist strap with a detachable 
ground wire) and connect its wire to 
ground. That will prevent the dreaded 
static discharge from destroying your 
IC or other components on the circuit 
board. If you don't have a ground 
strap, discharge yourself on a cold- 
water pipe or some other type of 



ground before starting work. Finally 
use a small-diameter pointed or 
wedge tip on your soldering iron. That 
helps to heat only the area intended 
to be heated, and will prevent circuit- 
board runs from being lifted. 

As a last resort, Mr Perdue's deso- 
ldering braid method, as described in 
his letter, will work. Using either the 
solder-sucker or the solder-wick 
method will take some practice, and 
I, too, would recommend that the 
novice practice on a junk circuit board 
to get a feel for either method. That 
lessens the chance of accidentally 
destroying a good circuit board or its 
components. 
STEVEN E. SWENTON 
Glen Burnie, MD 

I/O CARD INPUT 

I was intrigued by Mark Hanslip's 
article, "Build This Experimenter's 1/ 
O Card (Radio-Electronics, 

June 1990). I find it amazing that the 
8255 PPl, an LSI IC introduced about 
a decade and a half ago for 8080 



systems, is still being used in new 
designs. 

I disagree with the author's state- 
ment about Port B when POrt A is 
initialized for mode 2 operation: "Port 
B is not used at all." Although Port B 
cannot be initialized for mode 2 oper- 
ation, it is far from useless. Port B, 
independent of Port A's mode of op- 
eration, can still be used in either 
mode or 1. 

One last thing: The pins of Port C 
that are not commandeered for use 
by Ports A and B (when operating in 
modes 1 and/or 2 for handshaking) 
are available for use as input or output 
lines. 

JAMES KOVAR 
Lincoln, NE 
Fig. 1 goes here 

Mr. Kovar has a point. The chart 
that be provided (Fig. leaves a 
blank where Port B would be located 
in relation to mode 2. As t have never 
needed to use mode 2, the situation 
has never come up. Thanks, Mr 
h^var for clearing up that anomaly. 



Mode Definition Summary 



PAo 


MODE 




M0DE1 


IN 


OUT 


IN 


OUT 


IN 


OUT 


IN 


OUT 


PA, 


IN 


OUT 




IN 


put_-. 


PAj 
PA3 

PA, 
PA5 
PAe i 
PA, 


IN 

IN 


OUT 


n 




OUT 
OUT 
OUT 


PBo 


IN 


OUT 


\H 


OUT 


PB, 


IN 


OUT 




IN 


OUT 


PBj 


IN 


OUT 


Ok 


, IN 


OUT 


PB3 


IN 


OUT 


IN 


OUT 


PB, 


IM 


OUT 




IN 


OUT 


PB5 


IN 


OUT 




IN 


OUT 


PBs 


IN 


OUT 




IN 


OUT 


PB? 


IN 


OUT 




IN 


OUT 


PCo 


IN 


OUT 


INTRg 


INTRa 


PC, 


IN 


OUT 




IBFb 


OBFo 


PC; 


IN 


OUT 




STBb 


ACK 


PC3 


IN 


OUT 




!NTR, 


INTFt 


PC, 


IN 


OUT 




STB^ 


I/O 


PCs 


IN 


OUT 




IBF, 


1,'0 


PCe 


IN 


OUT 




I/O 


ACK, 


PC, 


IN 


OUT 




I/O 


OBF, 



MODE 2 



GROUP A ONLY 






I/O 

I/O 

I/O 
I NTR a 
STB;^ 
IBFa 
ACK^ 
OBFa 



12 



The 8255 is truly a great device. It 
allows for software-configurable 
hardware. In the past. I have designed 
interfaces using the 8255 for Apple, 
Radio Shack. Timex, Decision Mate 
V, and S-WO computers. 
MARK HANSLIP 

TUBE TALK 

While browsing through some old 
issues of Radio-Electronics I 
came across several letters in the 
December 1988 issue that dealt with 
tubes from Russia being imported 
into this country, and it brought to 
mind an experience 1 once had. 

At a government auction (where I 
purchased a couple of pallets of test 
gear), a well-dressed fellow was bid- 
ding on items that I considered to be 
just so much junk. (After all, they 
were all full of tubes.) He was picking 
the stuff up by the ton, while hardly 
anyone else there showed any inter- 
est in it. 

When I asked him about his pur- 
chases, he told me that he and two 
other ex- Air-Force pilots had formed 
their own business, hie went around 
the country to all the government 
auctions and routed his purchases to 
a port, where they were loaded onto a 
ship and sent to Taiwan. One of his 
partners headed a group there that 
dismantled all the gear, "even salvag- 
ing the pan-head screws." The tubes, 
considered "choice" items, were re- 
routed to Europe where they com- 
manded a very high price. (The third 
ex-pilot handled the European end.) 

When I saw those letters about 
Russian tubes, I couldn't help but 
wonder: "Does it seem likely that a 
lot of our own tubes are coming back 
at us — re-labeled?" 
RUSSELL RIESBERG 
Weimar, CA 

ALL ABOUT THX SOUND 

In Josef Bernard's June 1990 arti- 
cle, 'All About Surround Sound," he 
gives the mistaken impression that 
"THX" is ".. just quality control for 
movie sound ..." The THX Sound 
System was developed by Tom 
Holman for the main sound-mixing 
theater at Lucasfilm. It consisted of 
particular speakers mounted in a 
special construction behind the 
screen along with a crossover de- 
signed with those elements in mind. 
Its sound was amazing. Since the 
vast majority of sound systems in cin- 
emas were outdated, and few could 



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handle the dynatnics of a Lucasfilm 
movie, the THX system was licensed 
to theaters. As a former "THX engi- 
neer" 1 was involved in some of the 
first installations. The theater had to 
meet certain acoustical criteria con- 
cerning the overall noise level, rever- 
beration time, and more. If a theater 
couldn't meet those criteria, it could 
not get a THX system. If it could, the 
theater was shut down vyhile the 
screen was removed so that the THX 
wall could be built and the speakers 
installed. The THX crossover was put 
in along with amplifiers that also had 
to meet certain standards. 

Thus, if a movie patron went to a 
THX theater, they would be listening 
to the same system that the sound 
was mixed on. The "quality control" 
consisted of periodic checks of align- 
ment. As for the letters "THX," I re- 
member that Tom Holman designed 
the crossover or X-over 
ROBERT HUGHES 
San Francisco, CA 

Since Mr. Hughes was thete. and I 
merely got my information second- 
hand, t will have to bow to his exper- 
tise — and thank him for the additional 
background on THX. My original point 



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is still valid, however THX is just a 
special case of Dolby Steneo, and 
one should not expect to be able to 
rent or purchase videotapes or laser 
discs recorded using a "THX pro- 
cess. " 
JOSEF BERNARD 



CHAOS vs. CLASSICAL 
PHYSICS 

While sitting in my den the other 
day, reading James Gleick's fas- 
cinating book called Chaos, I took a 
break to thumb through the new is- 
sue of Radio-Electronics. In the 
"Letters" column, I read with as- 
tonishment the letter from Jon 
Rolph criticizing Don Lancaster's 
ideas about the size of the brain's 
computer and its relationship to 
other computers. I'm astonished 
because of its parallel to one of the 
main themes in Chaos. The painful, 
"feet-of-clay" conservatism that 
has hampered the emerging super 
science of chaos for nearly a de- 
cade appears from Mr Rolph's let- 
ter to have infected computer 
science as well. Chaos's pioneer 
physicists and mathematicians, 
men like Mandelbrot and Feigen- 
baum, literally risked their careers 
by publishing the new and radical 
ideas embodied in chaos and fractal 
geometry. Still considered a re- 
negade science by many, those 
new ideas have rattled the rusty old 
cages of many disciplines, Mr, 
Rolph's suggestion that any radical 
departure from the classical under- 
standing of a science might "set us 
all back a few paces" is the very 
kind of thinking that has plagued the 
advancement of chaos as a scien- 
tific discipline. The only way we pro- 
gress in our thinking is to make 
those conceptual leaps that go 
beyond proven classical knowledge 
to provide the theory and hypoth- 
esis for the next generation to 
prove or disprove. Condemning 
Don Lancaster and Hardware 
Hacker for allowing to appear in 
print aberrations such as the idea of 
computer systems "waking up" or 
four-gigabit brains is not an argu- 
ment against the fear of new tech- 
nology, as Mr. Rolph suggests, but 
a demonstration of that very fear. 

I am writing this letter on a desk- 
top computer that itself has nearly 
four gigabits of memory. It is my 
personal workstation, and I consid- 



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er it to be quite "awake" In many 
respects. It clearly has a personality 
of sorts. It expects nny interaction 
with it to follow certain behavior pat- 
terns and complains if I deviate from 
them. It has a strong instinct toward 
self-presen/ation. It stops and asks 
me if I'm sure before it allows me to 
reformat its disk memory. Other 
computers, those that do real- 
world control applications, are 
aware of at least some of their sur- 
roundings and are able to interact 
with them. That all suggests a form 
of awareness that has obviously es- 
caped Mr Rolph. While he waits for 
his network to wake up and assault 
him, Heinlein style, he is sleeping 
through a revolution in computers. 
I applaud Don Lancaster for his 
imaginative thinking; I have been a 
follower since the days of the "TV 
Typewriter" I also applaud Radio- 
Electronics, for providing a forum 
for him and other innovative 
thinkers. 

PETER A. BARNES 
Cincinnati. OH 

SHARING FREEWARE 

I have thoroughly enjoyed each of 
the articles in Radio-Elec- 
tronics; it is one of the few pub- 
lications that I actually read cover- 
to-cover It is also one of the few 
magazines in my field that contains 
something I can share with every- 
one on at work, at any level of exper- 
tise. I'm not saying that I agree with 
everything in its pages, but that it 
promotes discussion on the art of 
electronics. 

One thing I'd like to share with 
other Radio-Electronics read- 
ers is that Linear Technology Cor- 
poration is supplying — for free — an 
improved freeware pspice version 
from Micros im. It provides 28 op- 
amp models, which model benched 
data. I don't like to keep lots of 
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digital signal processor 
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Piano. TX R-E 




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September is back-to-school 
time for many of tomorrow's 
engineers. It's the time that 
many students — along with those of 
us who haven't been students for 
some time — start looking for the per- 
fect scientific calculator. We may 
have found that perfect calculator the 
HP 48SX from Hewlett Packard (In- 
quiries manager, Hewlett-Packard 
Company. 1000 N.E. Circle Blvd.. 
Corvallis, OR 97330). 

The calculator, introduced earlier 
this year, boasts more than 2100 
functions. It allows equations to be 
entered the same way they would be 
written, and an impressive array of 
graphics functions lets you plot the 
equations. An RS-232 interface is 
available as an option, and an infrared 
interface is also offered. The stan- 
dard built-in memory consists of 
256K of ROM and 32K of RAM. but 
plug-in cards allow you to expand 
memory to 51 2K of ROM and 288K 
of RAM. 

Using the 48SX 

Without question, the 48SX\s the 
most powerful and advanced hand- 



held calculator available. Getting ac- 
cess to all of that power is not alwrays 
easy because some functions don't 
work the way you would intuitively 
expect. Also, the larger than 800- 
page CD manual, while excellent on 
specifics and details, does not give a 
good overview of what the calculator 
has to offer (We would recommend 
stopping by an HP dealer who should 
have a demo disk or RAM card that 
does provide a good overview.) 

The HP 48SX offers several im- 
pressive and important features. Its 
EquationWriter application allows 
equations to be entered as you would 
write them. Its graphics capabilities 
integrate calculus and graphics func- 
tions to find roots, minima and max- 
ima, slopes, area under a curve, etc, 
A unique automatic unit management 
feature converts unlike units of mea- 
surements CI 48 different units in 16 
categories such as force and energy) 
automatically. An equation-solver 
function allows you to find the numer- 
ical solution to an equation without 
isolating the dependent variable. For 
example, if Ohm's law was entered as 
an equation, you could enter the nu- 



merical values of the known varia- 
bles, and the calculator would solve 
for the missing one. 

The calculator's keyboard contains 
49 keys, most of which perform three 
or four different functions. Each key's 
primaiy function is on the keyface, 
while its secondary functions are 
shown in orange, blue, and white leg- 
ends around the key. and are ac- 
cessed by using the appropriate shift 
key. Some secondary functions 
(lower-case letters. Greek letters, 
and special characters), which are 
not shown on the calculator's face, 
ans also available. The top row of keys 
are "soft" keys — they take on the 
function shown on the bottom, menu 
line of the display. 

Most mathematical operations are 
performed by entering arguments on 
to the stact< (which is a last-in, first- 
out sequence of storage locations) 
and then executing commands to ma- 
nipulate the stack contents. Although 
the display can show the contents of 
up to four stack locations, the actual 
stack size can be much larger, and is 




A SERIAL INTERFACE KIT is available as 
an option to allow you to link the cal- 
culator to a PC or Macintosh so you can 
take advantage of the computer's storage, 
printing, and display capabilities. 



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THE HP 48SX INTEGRATES GRAPHICS 
AND CALCULUS (unctions to automat- 
ically find roots, intersections, minima 
and maxima, derivatives, and the lilte. 

limited only by available RAM. 

As you might guess, the calculator 
uses reverse Polish notation to solve 
equations. For example, to find the 
sum of 2 + 2, you would enter both 
addends on the stack, and then per- 
form the addition. The keystrokes 
would be: "2 <enter> 2 <enter> 
+ ," The number 4 would appear at 
the top of the stack. 

Understanding the stack is the key 
to understanding how to use the cal- 
culator. Even when you enter an 
equation "as you would write it," you 
cannot solve it, plot it, or do anything 
else with it until you put it on the 
stack. Unfortunately, when you do 



move the equation onto the stack, it 
loses its "textbook appearance" and 
takes on a form more common to 
computers. That can be disconcert- 
ing and confusing until you get used 
to it — and the learning curve can be a 
steep one if you've never had any 
similar experience. 

You can name an equation that is 
stored on the stack. That's helpful 
because the name can be used to 
identify an equation that might other- 
wise be very difficult to recognize 
once it's moved to the stack— es- 
pecially if the equation contains inte- 
grals. 

While the 48SXs built-in functions 
are impressive, it's important to re- 
member that the calculator can be 
custom programmed through its 
built-in programming language. And 
we've barely mentioned the cal- 
culator's built-in functionsi The 48SX 
can handle all sorts of operations 
with arrays and matrices, statistics, 
algebra, calculus, logical operations, 
vectors, complex numbers, and 
more. It can also produce eight dif- 
ferent types of plots from function 
plots to histograms, and from scatter 
plots to polar and parametric plots. 



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Equation Library 

Hewlett-Packard calls the 48SX3r\ 
expandable calculator. One way it can 
be expanded is w/ith plug-in cards, 
such as the HP Solve Equation Li- 
brary Applications Card, which con- 
tains nnore than 300 science and 
engineering equations. The library's 
main menu contains such entries as 

ELECTRICITY. FLUIDS, HEAT TnANSFEfl, OPTICS. 
OSCILLATIONS, and SOLID STATE DEVICES. 

Each main entry contains sub-entries 
and equations, and in some cases, 
pictorial representations. 

The equation library also contains a 
library of constants. Avogadro's 
number. Planck's constant, and the 
rest mass of an electron are among 
the 40 physical constants in the li- 
brary (In both SI and English units). 

A periodic table is available, as are 
various financial applications. And of 
course, things wouldn't be complete 
without a game of some sort. 
Minehunt should provide a pleasant 
diversion for both the bored and the 
frazzled engineer 

Although the equation library Is the 
only currently available ROM card, 
HP does plan to introduce special 
cards to customize the HP 48SX for 
specialized applications. 



Serial interface kit 

For those more comfortable work- 
ing with a large monitor and standard 
QWERTY keyboard, an RS-232 inter- 
face allows you to take full control of 
the calculator from your PC or Macin- 
tosh. Programs, plots, and data can 
be stored on dlsks^a convenient 
way to swap them with other users. 
The Interface kit gives your PC as 
much or greater power (although not 
the speed) of many comparable math 
software packages. But try putting 
one of those packages in your pocket 
and using It without a computer at- 
tached! 

Of course, the power of the HP 
4SSX doesn't come for fnse. The cal- 
culator itself costs $350. The serial 
interface carries a list price of 
$99.95, as does the HP Solve Equa- 
tion Library Application card. RAM 
cards cost $79.95 (32K) or $250 
C128K). 

With the 48SX. Hewlett-Packard 
maintains its leadership position in 
the scientific-calculator business. 
While we're inclined to say that the 
4SSX Is the last calculator you'll ever 
need, we won't — HP is probably al- 
ready hard at work to make its suc- 
cessor even more Impressive. R-E 




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FIBER-OPTIC DE- 
SIGNER'S KITS. Pro 

viding a leam-by-doing ap- 
proach to the design and 
use of fiber optics in data 
communications, Sintec's 
Fiber-Optic Kits are avail- 
able in both simplex and 
duplex versions, for single 
or bi-directional links. No 
previous training or experi- 
ence is needed to com- 
plete these hands-on 
courses. Each contains all 
the components required 
to construct a 10-meter 
data link, which can be ex- 
tended to 60 meters with 
optional extension pack- 
ages. The link operates off 
a single -f-5-volt power 
supply and interfaces to all 
TTL/CMOS logic devices. 
Each kit contains fiber-op- 
tic emitteKs), detectoKs), 
printed wiring boardCs), all 
necessary electronic com- 
ponents, and 10 meters of 




CIRCLE 15 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



either simplex or duplex ca- 
ble. The fiber-optic connec- 
tions for interfacing to the 
emitter, the detector, and 
two bulkheads are also in- 
cluded, along with a fiber- 
optic splice. The connec- 
tions are made from a dry, 
non-polished interface that 
is easy to handle and re- 
quires no special tools. The 
parts are packaged in an 
impact-resistant plastic 



box, which also contains 
assembly and fiber-termi- 
nation instructions. 

Prices for the fiber-op- 
tics designer's kits range 
from $59,95 to $89.95, de- 
pending on the version and 
the length. — Sintec 
Company, 28 8th Street, 
P.O. Box 410, Frenchtown, 
NJ 08825; Tel. 201- 
996-4095; Fax 201-996- 
3891. 



DIGITAL/ANALOG 
MULTIMETER. Sporting 
both 3'/4-digit and linear 
bar-graph readouts for 
measurement display to 
4,000 counts. B&K-Preci- 
sion's model 2919 hand- 
held digital/analog multi- 
meter is designed for situa- 
tions where the accuracy 
of a digital readout and the 
responsiveness of an ana- 




CIRCLE 16 ON FREE 
INFORMATION CARD 



log display are needed. The 
41-segment bar graph, 
which is updated 20 times 
per second to follow 
changing values, simplifies 
peaking or level adjust- 
ments. "Data hold" imme- 
diately freezes the dis- 
played digital reading, and 
"peak hold" holds the high- 
est digital value obtained 
during a measurement, 
while "min/max" memory 
stores the lowest and high- 
est reading observed. 

The model 2912 also of- 
fers selectable auto- or 
manual ranging; measure- 
ment of voltage, current, 
and resistance; diode 
check; and an audible con- 
tinuity check. Additional 
functions include capaci- 
tance measurement up to 
40 mP and frequency to 
400 kHz. The meter is 



rated at 0.3% accuracy on 
DC volts, and spans 40 
ranges, including the fre- 
quency counter and capac- 
itance functions. It is well- 
protected against reverse 
polarity and overioads, and 
features high-energy fus- 
ing to protect the jiA/mA 
current ranges. 

The 2912 handheld ana- 
log/digital multimeter 
costs $149.00.— B&K- 
Precision, Division of 
Maxtec International Cor- 
poration, 6470 West Cor- 
tland Street, Chicago, IL 
60635; Tel. 312-89-9087. 

COAXIAL ADAPTER 
KIT. Pomona's Model 
5693 Universal Adapter Kit 
allows lab workers, field- 
service/installation techni- 
cians, and designers to 
quickly "mix and match" al- 



most any combination of 
coaxial end termination 
styles, including banana 
plugs. The specially as- 
sembled kit allows users to 
make their own adapter 
combinations, such as 
SMA to BNC, or BNC to 
double banana plugs for 
connecting coax to instru- 
ments. The kit includes two 
male and two female of 
each the following: BNC, 
TNC, SMA, and "N" 
adapters. Four intermedi- 
ate coupling nuts, one dou- 
ble banana plug, and one 
double banana jack/bind- 
ing post round out the as- 
sortment. 

Each of the double-ba- 
nana jack/plug adapters 
are fitted with an integral 
coupler to accept any 
threaded coaxial con- 
nector. Individual con- 
nectors can be joined with 
a coupling nut to any other 




CIRCLE 17 ON FREE 
INFORMATION CARD 



to make the required coax- 
ial assembly The high-qual- 
ity adapters, which come 
equipped with gold-plated 
center pins and silver- 
plated bodies, are pack- 
aged in a convenient reusa- 
ble plastic case. 

The model 5698 Univer- 
sal Adapter Kit costs 
$99 00.— ITT Pomona 
Electronics, 1500 East 
Ninth Street, P.O. Box 
2767, Pomona, CA 91769; 
Tel. 714-623-3463, Fax 
714-629-3317. 



22 




CIRCLE 18 ON FREE 
INFORMATION CARD 

BATTERY TESTER. A 

quick, inexpensive means 
to determine the condition 
of a wide variety of bat- 
teries is provided by the 
BT-20A Battery Tester 
fronn A.W. Sperry. The 
compact, handheld instru- 
ment can be used to test all 
popular batteries from 
1.25- to 22. 5-volts DC— in- 
cluding hearing-aid bat- 
teries; "AAA," "AA," "C," 



and "D" cells; 6-volt lan- 
terns; 3-volt lithium bat- 
teries: and 5.6- to 6-volt 
photo cells. The rugged 
tester is reliable and easy 
to use, and comes with a 
one-year warranty. 

The model BT-20A bat- 
teiy tester costs $15. 95. — 
A.W. Sperry Instru- 
ments Inc., 245 Marcus 
Boulevard, Hauppauge, NY 
11788; Tel. 516-231-7050. 

HANDHELD LOGIC 
ANALYZER. Intended 
as an affordable alternative 
to multiple logic probes. 
Global Specialties' model 
LM-8 TTL logic analyzer 
has trigger word recogni- 
tion that allows to it be 
used in place of more com- 
plex logic analyzers for 
troubleshooting 8-, 16-, 
and 32-bit microprocessor 
circuits. The LM-8 has 
eight input channels, an ex- 
ternal clock input, and an 
oscilloscope trigger out- 



put. The number of chan- 
nels can be expanded to as 
many as 32 by linking four 
pods together and trigger- 
ing from a 32-bit trigger 
word. The captured data 
can be displayed by the 
built-in LED's or on an os- 
cilloscope. Each channel's 
trigger can be set to 0, 1 , or 
"don't care." The logic sta- 
tus of each channel is con- 
tinuously displayed on the 
LED's. Pulse stretching al- 
lows high-frequency or 
short-duration pulses to be 
viewed. The maximum 




CIRCLE 19 ON FREE 
INFORMATION CARD 



clock frequency is 25 MHz, 
with pulses as narrow as 
10-ns wide being captunsd 
and displayed. 

The LM-8 provides two 
operating modes: run and 
TRIGGERED. In the RUN mode, 
the data is continuously up- 
dated every time the trig- 
ger word is recognized. In 
the TRIGGER mode, the data 
is captured and . displayed 
until the trigger word is rec- 
ognized, at which time the 
analyzer is halted and the 
last data held. 

The LM-8 handheld logic 
analyzer, complete with 
grabber leads for each data 
channel, costs $249. 95.— 
Global Specialties, 70 
Fulton Teirace, New Haven, 
CT 06512; Tel. 1-800- 
572-1028. 

MULTIMETER LEADS. 

Silicon-rubber multimeter 
leads from Test Probes, 
Inc. remain soft and flexible 
even under conditions of 




Model 


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CIRCLE 20 ON FREE 
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extreme cold. The TLS200 
owes its flexibility to the 
fine silicon wires in the ca- 
ble. It fits all makes of ana- 
log and digital multimeters 
that are equipped with 
standard 4-mm input jacks. 
Offered in straight or right- 
angle plug versions, with 
an array of interchangeable 
accessories available, the 
leads are suitable for a 
wide variety of measure- 
ment applications. Their 
low contact resistance fa- 
cilitates accurate measure- 
ments of low voltages and 
resistances. 



The TLS2000 multime- 
ter leads cost $30.00.— 
Test Probes, Inc., 91 78 

Brown Deer Road, San Di- 
ego, CA 92121; Tel, 
619-535-9292. 

PREISOLATED 
POWER TRAN- 
SISTORS For use in 

color monitors, power sup- 
plies, and high-voltage 
switching applications, 
Samsung is offering pre- 




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LEARN TO BUILD & PROGRAM 
COMPUTERS WITH THIS KIT! 

INCLUDES ALL PARTS, ASSEMBLY & LESSON MANUAL 



MODEL 
MM'8000 

$129.00 







o 

UI 

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m 

6 

Q 

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DC 

24 



Starting from scratch you build a complBte computer system. Our 
Micro-Master * trainer teaches you to write Into RAMs, ROMs and 
run a 8085 microprocessor, which uses the same machine language 
as IBM PC, You will write the initial instructions to teli ttiB 8085 pro- 
cessor to get started and store these instructions In permanent 
memory In a 2816 E' PROM. Teaches you all about Input and output 
ports, computer timers. Build your own Keyboard and learn how to 
scan keyboard and display. No previous computer knowledge re- 
quired. Simple easy to understand Instruction teaches you to write in 
machine language, add 5% For ShiDDing. 



C&S SALES INC. (800) 292-7711 

1245 Rosewood, Deerfleld. IL 60015 (312) 541-0710 
15 Day Money Back Guarantee Write For Free Catalog 



CIRCLE 109 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



isolated bipolar powertran- 
sistors in T0-3PF pack- 
ages that simplify mount- 
ing procedures. The iso- 
lated packages offer better 
EMI control for ungrounded 
heat sinks, require less 
mounting hardware, and 
are cost effective, The 
power transistors can han- 
dle 1500-volt collector- 
base voltage. The devices 
have a 5,000-volt isolation 
rating, eliminate bushings 
and isolation pads, and 
have no exposed metal sur- 
faces other that the leads. 

The pre-isolated power 
transistors have excellent 
thermal characteristics 
when mounted to a heat 
sink and an industry-stan- 
dard footprint. The devices 
are built with special over- 
sized lead frames for good 
heat-spreading perfor- 
mance. A thin, tightly con- 
trolled thermal epoxy over 
a back-mounting surface 
further improves their heat- 
spreading capabilities. 

Bght devices— XSDSOW- 
KSD501 7~are available. 
When ordered in quantities 
between 100 and 999, the 
prices range from $1.55 to 
$2.10 each, — Samsung 
Semiconductor. 3725 
North First Street, San 
Jose, CA 951 34-1 708; Tel. 
408-434-5400. 



DIGITAL CLAMP 
METER. Four advanced 
digital clamp meters intro- 
duced by C.G. Instruments 
have 3%-digit displays and 
offer up to 4,000 counts. 
All four meters are UL 
listed and have rugged, 
drop-proof enclosures. 
They feature large clamp- 
ing jaw openings to allow 
easy measurements of ca- 
bles and bus bars up to 
2.95 inches in diameter. 

The Soar 632 AC Clamp 
Meter (shown in photo) 
has a basic accuracy of 
± 1%. provides 3200 
counts, and has an analog 
bar-graph indicator. Its fea- 
tures include auto and man- 




CIRCLE 22 ON FREE 
INFORMATION CARD 

ual range select, data-hold 
function, audible continuity 
test, and low power con- 
sumption. The 632 mea- 
sures AC current to 1000 
amps in two ranges. AC 
volts to 630 volts in two 
ranges, AC/DC volts up to 
630 volts, and ohms to 3.2 
Kohms in two ranges. The 
Soar 641 and Soar 642 
each provide 4000 counts 
and feature an analog bar- 
graph indicator, data hold, 
peak hold, max hold, aver- 
aging functions, and diode- 
audible continuity test ca- 
pabilities. 

The meters measure AC 
to 1000 amps in three 
ranges, AC/DC volts to 
630 volts in three ranges, 
ohms to 4 Kohm in two 
ranges, frequency from 20 
Hz to 999.9 Hz with 0.1 Hz 
resolution, and tempera- 
ture from — 50° to 
-H130°C. The model 641 
has an average-type sens- 
ing mode; the 642 offers 
true RMS, The fourth in- 
strument in the group is the 
Soar643, a true RMS, mul- 
tifunction, AC/DC current 
clamp meter with 4000 
count that measures AC/ 
DC current to 1000 amps 
as well as all the features of 
the models 641 and 642. 

List prices for the digital 
clamp meters start at 
$124.95.— C.G. Instru- 
ments Corp., 434 Wind- 
sor Park Drive, Dayton, OH 
45459; Tel. 513-434-6952; 
Fax 513-434-7643. R-E 



Electronics KrDDDilD^/^© 





CALL NOW 
AND 

RESERVE 
YOUR SPACE 

• 6 X rate $940.00 per each insertion. 

• Fast reader service cycle. 

• Short lead time for the placement of 
atis. 

• We typeset and layout the ad at no 
additional charge. 



Call 516-293-3000 to reserve space. Ask 

for Arline Fishman. Limited number of 

pages available. Mail materials to: 

mini-ADS, RADIO-ELECTRONICS, 500- 

B Bi-County Blvd., Farmingdale, NY 

11735. 

FAX: 516-293-3115 




SIMPLY SNAP THE WAT-50 MINIATURE FM 
TRANSMITTER on top of a 9v battery and 
hear every sound in an entire house up to 1 
mile away! Adjustable from 70-130 MHZ. Use 
with any Fl^ radio. Complete kit $29.95 + 
$1.50 S + H. Free shipping on 2 or more! COD 
add $4. Call or send VISA, MC, MO. DECO 
INDUSTRIES, Box 607, Bedford Hills, NY 
10507. (914) 232-3878. 
CIRCLE 1Z7 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




CABLE TV CONVERTERS AND DE- 
SCRAftflBLERS SB-3 $79.00 TRI-BI $95.00 
MLD-$79.00 M35B $69.00 DR2-DIC 
$149.00. Special combos available. We ship 
COD. Quantity discounts. Call for pricing on 
other products. Dealers wanted. FREE CATA- 
LOG. We stand behind our products where 
others fail. One year warranty. ACE PROD- 
UCTS. P.O. Box 582, Saco, ME 04072 1 
(800) 234-0726. 
CIRCLE 75 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




APPLIANCE REPAIR HANDBOOKS— 13 
volumes by service experts; easy-to- 
undersland diagrams, illustrations. For major 
appliances (air conditioners, refrigerators, 
wastiers, dryers, microwaves, etc.), elec. 
housewares, personal-care appliances. 
Basics of solid state, setting up shop, test 
instruments, $2.65 to $7.90 each. Free 
brochure. APPLIANCE SERVICE, P.O. Box 
789, Lombard, IL 60146. (312) 932-9560. 
CIRCLE 64 ON FREE IMFORMATION CARD 



ONE HOUR PROTOTYPING 




LOCH NESS INC. 



1 HOUR PROTOTYPING!! Develop Multi- 
layered Printed Circuit Boards in Less than 1 
Hour with the New Loch Ness Quick-circuit 
Kit! Process is Patent Pending. No dangerous 
UV lights! No hole drilling! No mistakes! Kit 
comes with everything to make 216 sq. 
inches of PCB. Money back guarantee. Send 
$65.00 to LOCH NESS, INC., 3700 Colfax 
Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55409. 
1-800-323-8623. 

CIRCLE 193 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 







LOW COST PC LOGIC ANALYZER. De 

signed for students and hobbyists working 
with 5V TTI/CMOS signals in the Khz range. 
36" data cable — eight channels, external 
clock, ground. Selectable trigger & clock 
edge, internal clock (iHz-IOOKhz). Full-fea- 
tured software, slate table graphics, file/print 
utilities, etc. Over 100,000 samples/sec on 12 
Mhz AT UM— $99.95, PHOTRONICS, INC. 
109 Camille St., Amite, LA 70422 (504) 
222-4146. 
CIRCLE 199 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



THE MODEL WTT-20 IS ONLY THE SIZE OF 

A DIME, yet transmits both sides of a tele- 
phone conversation to any FM radio with 
crystal clarity. Telephone line powered - never 
needs a battery! Up to 'A mile range. Adjusta- 
ble from 70-130 MHZ. Complete kit $29.95 
-I- $1.50 S-t- H. Free Shipping on 2 or more! 
COD add $4. Call or send VISA, MC. MO 
DECO INDUSTRIES, Box 607. Bedford 
Hills. NY 10507. (914) 232-3878. 

CIRCLE 127 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



GET YOUR RECHARGE CATALOG 
FREE.. .EARN BIG $$ IN YOUR SPARE 

TIME — All supplies and Do- 1 1- Yourself kits 
with complete instructions available. Sup- 
plies cost from $9.95 in qty and you can sell 
recharged toner cartridges for $40.00 to 
$55.00 each. Printers include HP LaserJet 
and Series II, Apple LaserWriter, QMS, etc. 
Canon PC-25 Copier also. CHENESKO 
PRODUCTS, 62 N Coleman Rd., Cen- 
tereach, NY 11720, 516-736-7977, 
800-221-3516, Fax: 516-732-4650 
CIRCLE 183 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



CO 

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to 
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NEW LIT 



Use the Free Information Card for fast response. 




CIRCI-E 23 ON FREE 
INFORMATION CARD 



STATICIDE: THE PER- 
FECT SOLUTION TO 
COSTLY STATIC 
PROBLEMS. ACL In 
corporated, 1960 East 
Devon Ave.. Elk Grove 
Village, IL 60007; Tel. 



708-981-9212; fax 
708-981-9278; free. 

This 8-page, full-color 
catalog of static-control 
products features Staticlde 
liqutds, wipes, floor finish, 
electrostatic locators, 
work-surface cleaners, and 
surface-resistivity meters. 
New products include lint-, 
free wipes, dual-tipped 
foam swabs, and the Tech 
Essentials cleaning kit line. 

CORDLESS TELE- 
PHONE BATTERIES. 
Power Pak, Inc., 6216 
Oakton Street, Mor- 
ton Grove, IL 60053; 
Tel. 1-800-637-2212; 
free. 

This guide to replace- 
ment batteries for cordless 
telephones is written to 



help the user make an intel- 
ligent, well-informed selec- 
tion. The brochure is filled 
with specifications and 
complete cross-reference 
material, along with other 
information about replace- 
ment batteries. 








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INFORMATION CARD 



CIRCLE 25 ON FREE 
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ELECTRONIC SECUR- 
ITY AND MODERN 
CONVENIENCES. 
Vantage Point Tech- 
nologies, 630 Nordahl 
Road, Suite P9, San 



to 
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CRAMOUN' DeOxidizer 



DEOXIDIZES • CLEANS • PRESERVES • LUBRICATES • 

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CIRCLE 50 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



r- 



Marcos, CA 92069; 
Tel. 800-272-1375 or 
619-565-1863; free. 

Electronic security sys- 
tems and accessories de- 
signed for do-it-yourself 
installations are described 
in a clean easy- to- under- 
stand style in this 32-page 
catalog. The brochure 
covers a broad range of 
high-tech systems for resi- 
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government needs — rang- 
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alarms to state-of-the art 
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Some of the products de- 
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alarm systems, motion de- 
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switches, fire detectors, si- 
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tools and books. Helpful in- 
stallation and product tips 
are provided throughout 
the catalog. R-E 



Cable TV 

Descrambler Article Parts 

We stock the exact Parts for several articles published in Radio-Electronics 
magazine op buildirtg your own Cable TV Descrambler. 



February 1984 
SB-3 Type 

701 Parts Pkg $19.00 

Includes all original paffs. 

702 PC Board 7.95 

Original 3X4 etctted, drilled 
and Silk'Screen pc board. 

704 AC Adaptor 7.95 

rz to IS Volt DC & JOOma. 

701, 702 & 704 29.00 

All three lor special saving. 



February 1987 

Tri-Mode 

301 Parts Pkg 29.00 

Includes all original parts. 

302 PC Board 7.95 

Original 5X3 elclJed, diilied 
and Silk- Screen pc hoard. 

304 AC Adaptor 7.95 

12 to re Volt DC @ 200ma. 

301, 302 & 304 39.00 

All ttirea lor special savings. 



May 1990 
Universal 

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infrared Module 



Neater wiring 



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Tantalum caps 



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Complete, 
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(2) 



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22 


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coax OT audio cabte. ll^e^ snap choice 

together. '*273'V04 . . Stl of 2/7.9S 



Resistance Items Shielded D-Sub Hoods "Ding- Dong" chime Rod Antennas 




(1) 15-Tum Tfimmars. Ik, if271-342 
tOk, »271-343 20k, #271-340. Eacli 1.49 

(2) Precision Thermistor. Resistance 

changes In proportion to ternperatore 
-50 to -I-110' C. *271-110 .... 1.99 

(3) Color-Code Decoder. 
t271-12t0 79« 



(n 



m 




H 



Fig. 


Description 


Cat. No. 


Each 


1 
2 


9- Position Melal 

25-Posilion Melal 
9-Pos. Metalijed 
25-Pos. Metal iieO 


276-1508 
276-1510 
27S-1513 
276-1536 


2.19 
2.79 
1.49 
1.99 



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(1) 



^ 

n 



(2) 



0) 



fH 



(4) 



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ble. (^278-140 1-99 



I r 



(6) (7), 







|2) TNC Double-Female. 


C 278-1 4: 


,1.99 


Fig. 


Accepts 


Fiis TNC 


Cat. No 


Each 


3 

4 


PL- 259 
BNC Male 


Female 

Female 


278-118 

278-115 


3 49 
4.99 



(5) MInUUHF Double- Femite. Joins two 

male mini-UHFs. #278-172 2.49 

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Great 
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A 



This IC and mini-speaker combo 
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Extended 


Cal No. 


Each 


5 
6 

4 


13" 

IT^i" 

343(.- 


270-1407 
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2.79 
2 59 
379 



solderiess IDC-Tvpe connectors 



(f) 



(2) 



(3) 



(4) 



15) 



Ra. 


Description 


Cat No 


Each 


1 

2 
3 
4 

s 


25- Position D-Sub Male 
25-Posilion D-Sub Female 
34-Posi!ion Header 
36-Postiion Male Printer Connector 
34-P05itlon CarO-Edge Conneclor 


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Electronic 

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32 



BUILD R-E's 

VOCAL STRIPPER 




ALMOST EVERYONE ENJOYS LISTENING TO 

music, and just about as many- 
people enjoy singing along to 
their favorite songs. If you're one 
of the many people who loves to 
sing, you may be interested in a 
clever audio device that filters out 
lead vocals from a stereo record- 
ing, leaving just the background 
music. For under $50.00, you 
can build this unique audio filter- 
ing device. Impress your friends 
with this Karaoke-like audio sys- 
tem and enjoy hours of singing 
pleasure. 

Filtering out the vocal tracks 
from a recording is not as simple 
as merely eliminating the mid- 
range frequencies. Along with 



the vocals, the midrange fre- 
quencies contain a large portion 
of the music. Vocal filtering is 
quite easy, however if you take 
advantage of the way stereo re- 
cordings are mixed. 

Stereo mixing 

Wlien mixing is done in a stu- 
dio, each instrument or voice is 
assigned a position relative to left 
(L) and right (R) channels. Some 
instruments are recorded at 
higher levels on the right channel 
so that their sounds seem to 
come from the right side of the 
stage. Others are recorded on the 
left channel for the opposite 
effect. Lead vocals and instru- 



Bulld this lead 

vocal filter 

and test 

your singing 

ability. 

TERRY J. WEEDER 



ments such as the bass drum 
and bass guitar are usually re- 
corded at the same level on both 
channels so they seem to come 
from center stage. That is what 
makes lead vocal filtering possi- 
ble. 

Vocal signals, which consist 
primarily of mid-high range fre- 
quencies, can be filtered out by a 
series of filtering stages shown in 
Fig. 1. Bass instruments, corre- 
sponding to a lower frequency 
range, can be diverted to a final 
mixing stage so that the music is 
not filtered out Eilong with the vo- 
cals. 

A signal from one channel is 
inverted and subtracted from the 



B1SHT 

CHANNEL 

IN 

CcS — 



BUFFER 



{BASS 
INSTRUMENTS) 

LOW 



CROSSOVER 



iHWm 



(VOCAL 
' SIGNALS) 



VARIABLE 
DELAY 



S 



LEFT 

CHANNEL 

IN 

r 



R49 
PHASE 
R36 
BALANCE 



BUFFER 



CROSSOVER Vi'J^ 



Ih I/MID I ?4ms I i, 
PtvOCAl' l DELAY | 



(VOCAL 
' SIGNALS) 



LOW PASS 
FILTER 



ll 



DIFFERENCE 
AMP 



:^ 



LOW PASS 
FILTER 



-T""^ MIXERt 



VOCAL-LESS f 
SIGNALS 



LOW 

(BASS 
INSTRUMENTS) 



V 



BUFFER 




RIGHT 

CHANNEL 

OUT 



LEFT 

CHANNEL 

OUT 



BUFFER 



FIG 1— BLOCK DIAGRAM OF FILTER NETWORK. Right channel signal is inverted and 
subtracted from the left channel, cancelling the lead vocals. Low frequencies are by- 
passed by an active crossover and remixed with the difference signal, without the vocals. 



33 
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o 



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o 

3D 
O 

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33 



other (L-R), which causes the 
lead vocals that are common to 
both channels to cancel out. The 
music common to the left and 
right channel remains un- 
changed. Unfortunately, along 
with the lead vocals, all low fre- 
quencies are common to both 
channels and must bypass the 
cancellation circuit. A simple ac- 
tive crossover removes the low 
frequencies so that they can be 
remixed with the vocal-less sig- 
nal at a later stage. 

From the active crossover 
stage, all midrange and high fre- 



quencies pass through a variable 
delay stage, U'hich is used to al- 
ign the left and right channel sig- 
nals so that they are exactly 180° 
out of phase with each other. 
Proper signal cancellation is 
achieved only when both signals 
are 180° out of phase. The low- 
pass filter stage filters out un- 
wanted high frequencies from 
the variable delay stage. The out- 
put of the low-pass filter enters a 
difference amp. where the lead 
vocal signals cancel, and is then 
remixed with the low frequencies 
at the final mixing stage. 



Here's how it works 

The schematic of the lead vocal 
filter is shown in Fig. 2, The left 
and right channel signals are 
coupled through CI and C2 to 
buffer amps lC4-a and IC4-b. 
From the buffer amps, the left 
and right channel signals pass 
through active crossovers lC5-a 
and lC5-b, sending all low fre- 
quencies to a final mixer lC6-c, 
and all middle and high frequen- 
cies to analog delay lines ICl and 
1C2, RD5106 256-sample bucket- 
brigades. Integrated circuit IC2 
delays the left channel signal by 




R4 
10K 



i 



R3 
10K 



■*^*TN 



RIGHT J1 
CHANMEK 
IN 




C3 R6i 
0-474,7Kf - 



IC5-b 
111 1/4 LM3Z4 

12V 





LEFT J2 
CHANNEL 
IN 




R13 , 

47K r^ 

R14^ V.LM3Z4 

^■^1 R1S. 

- 10K' 



rv^c-i-b 



• wv * 



IC5-C 
Va LM324 



R16 
JOK 



Ui im2i 



R17 

10K p 

R18 
3,3K 



13f^ 



V* LM324 



+ 12V 
i 



IK< 



RZO 
100K 



. J3 RIGHT 
— JP^CHANNEL 
021 JL OUT 





XO.1 



2 IC3-a 
1/4 4011 B 



IC3-b 
\7 V4 4(rl1B 



■w- 



n49 

10K 
PHASE 



C23 
lOOpF 




11 



towo- 



IC3-C 
V* 4011B 



IC3-d 
V<4011B 

:R47 
15K 

* If- 

C24 
100pF 



m 

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CO 



FIG. 2— SCHEMATIC OF LEAD VOCAL FILTER. Right and left channel signals pass 
through IC4-a and -b buffer amps into active crossover 1C5; low frequencies are sent to 
IC6-C iriixer, middle and high frequencies are sent to analog delay lines of ICl and IC2. 
That output passes through IC6-a and -d to filter high frequency sample steps. ICe-b 
signals are remixed with low frequencies by IC6-c and are sent to final output via IC4-c 
and -d buffers. 



34 



2.4 ms, set by the fixed-frequency 
clock generated by '/2-IC3, R47, 
and C24. The right channel sig- 
nal is delayed by ICl with a varia- 
ble-frequency clock generated by 
W-ICa, R48. R49, and C23. Po- 
tentiometer R49 is used for 
phase adjustment. 
The output of each delay line 



All resistors are vi-watt, 5%, unless 
otherwise indicated. 

R1, R2, R20. R24, R32, R33-R35— 
100,000 Olims 

R3, R4, R7-R9, R11. R12, R15, R16, R17, 
R27, R28. R37, R38, R43, R48— 
tO.OOO Olims 

R5, R13, R29, R30, R39, R40— 47,000 
ohms 

R6, R14, R31. R41— 4700 ohms 

RIO, R18. R44— 3300 ohms 

R19, R23— 33,000 ohms 

R21, R25— 1 megohm 

R22, R26— 10 ohms 

R36, B49 — 10,000 ohms, potentiometer 

R42, R45, R46— 22,000 ohms 

R47— 15.000 ohms 

Capacitors 

C1, C2. C7, C12— 1 U.F tantalum 

C3,C5— 0.47 |j.F tantalum 

C4, C6— 0,0047 JJ.F Mylar 

C8. C9, C10, Ct3, C14, Cl5. C25— 0.1 jiF 
Mylar 

C11, C16— 2.2 (jlF tantalum 

C17, C19— 220 pF ceramic disc 

CIS, C20-^7 pF ceramic disc 

C21, C22— 10 nF electrolytic 

C23. C24— 100 pF ceramic disc 

Semiconductors 

ICl, IC2— RD5106 256-sample bucket- 
brigade analog delay line, EG & G-Re- 
ticon 

IC3 — 4011 quad two-input nand gate 

IC4-IC6— LM324 quad op-amp 

Miscellaneous: Perforated circuit board, 
standoffs, mounting hardware, hookup 
wire, shielded cable, 18-AWG power 
supply cord, strain relief, and four RCA 
jacks for J1-J4. 

Power supply parts 

F1 — 0.5 amp fuse and fuseholder 

T1-— 24 VAC center-tapped transformer 

BR1— 1.5-amp bridge rectifier, 100 PIV 

CI, C2— 1000 M.F, 25 volts, eiectrolytic 

C3, C4— 10 (iF 16 volts, electrolytic 

C5, C6 — 0.1 (J.F, ceramic disc 

D1. D2— 12-volt Zener diode 

R1 , R2— 220 ohms 

R3— 1000 ohms 

SI— SPST switch, 1 amp 

LED1— light emitting diode, any cotor 

Note: The following are avaifable from 
Weeder Technologies, 14773 
Lindsey Rd., NH. Orab, Ohio 45154: 
An etched, drilled, and plated PC 
tioard, $15.00; a basic parts kit in- 
cluding all resistors, capacitors and 
semiconductors (not including 
power-supply components), $29.00. 
Please include S2.00 for shipping 
and handling in the U.S., $3.00 in 
Canada. Ohio residents add 5.5% 
sales tax. Allow 4 to 6 weeks for de- 
livery. 



from ICl and IC2 passes through 
low- pass-filters IC6-a and -d, and 
their associated parts, to filter 
out high-frequency sample-steps 
produced by ICl and IC2. Bal- 
ance control R36 is adjusted for 
equal amplitude of the left and 
right channels. IC6-b is a dif- 
ference amplifier which cancels 
all lead vocals that are common to 
both channels. The resulting sig- 
nal from lC6-b is remixed with 
low frequencies by IC6-c and is 
then sent to the output via buff- 
ers 1C4-C and lC4-d. 

Construction 

The easiest way to go about 
constructing the vocal filter cir- 
cuit is to use a PC board. An 



etched and drilled PC board is 
available from the source in the 
Parts List or you can make your 
own from the foil pattern pro- 
vided here. Mount the vocal filter 
components as shown in the 
parts placement diagram, Fig. 3. 
Use shielded wire to connect the 
RCA jacks, and ground them 
properly, either by mounting 
them to a grounded chassis or by 
soldering ground wires to their 
cases. The DC power supply leads 
from the power-supply board 
should be twisted to reduce noise 
transmission. 

If you don't use PC mounted 
potentiometers for R49 and R36, 
be sure to keep their connecting 
leads short and twist them to re- 



J3 J£ J1 




FIG. 3— PARTS PLACEMENT DIAGRAM. Remember to connect the jumper lead, use 
shielded cables for the RCA jacks and twist the supply leads before soldering to the LED 
and main PC board. 




FIG. 4— POWER SUPPLY SCHEMATIC for the lead vocal filter circuit. 



33 
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JUMPER LEAD v^ 



RCA JACKS 



SHIELDED SIGNAL 
LEADS 



MAIN } 
PC BOARD^ 




••:"| I POWER SUPPLY 
■■■:■/ BOARD 



~"""C TWIST POWER SUPPLY 

R49 R36 LBy)g 

PHASE ADJUSTMENT BALANCE CONTROL 



FIG. 5— AN INTERNAL VIEW OF THE LEAD VOCAL FILTER. 



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duce noise and hum pickup. It is 
preferable, though, to use 
shielded leads for these connec- 
tions. These potentiometers 



should be grounded by mounting 
to a grounded chassis. 

A simple power supply, like the 
one shown in Fig. 4. may be used 



for this device. The power supply 
can be mounted on a perforated 
circuit board, as long as you 
closely follow the component con- 
nections shown on the sche- 
matic. Although optimum perfor- 
mance is obtained with a ±12 
volt supply, the vocal filter gives 
good results using two 9-voIt bat- 
teries connected in series. 

The power supply and main PC 
board should be adequately en- 
closed before operating the vocal 
filter A metal enclosure is recom- 
mended, as a 120- volt line poten- 
tial is exposed in the power 
supply circuit (see Fig. 5). 

Hook up and operation 

The vocal filter should be con- 
nected into the tape loop of your 
stereo system. Use shielded ca- 
bles with phono connectors to 
connect inputs Jl and J2 to the 
"record" tape monitor jacks on 
your stereo, and outputs J3 and 
J4 to the "play" side. To use the 
vocal filter with a tape deck that 
normally uses tape monitor 
jacks, plug the output "play" 
jacks of the tape deck into Jl and 
J2 of the vocal filter. Plug J3 and 
J4 into the input or "play" jacks 
of the stereo. Make sure you apply 
power to the vocal filter before 
turning on the stereo; sensitive 
components in the vocal filter 
may be damaged if a signal is ap- 
plied before power is turned on. 

Set R36 to its middle position, 
play a stereo sound track or tune 
in an FM stereo broadcast, and 
switch in the tape monitor Ad- 
just R49 for minimum lead vo- 
cals, then adjust R36. Repeat 
that process Lmtil the lead vocals 
are suppressed. 

If you think the vocal filter is 
not working, tune in to a mono 
FM broadcast. If you can't find 
one, tune to a stereo station, and 
adjust the tuning knob either 
way, just enough so the stereo 
light goes off If the vocal filter 
operates properly, you should be 
able to adjust R36 and R49 to 
filter out all music except low fre- 
quencies. 

With a little help from Radio 
Electronics, you now have the 
know-how to build a fairly simple 
audio filtering device in just a few 
short evenings. Once completed, 
you can use this system to prac- 
tice singing alone, or be creative 
and have all your friends over for 
a Karaoke party! R-E 



36 



Build R-E's 




WITH THE EVER INCREASING VARIETY 

of pay telephone services such as 
Dial-A-Sex, Dial-A-Party. and 
Dial-A-Friend, the telephone 
abuses at home and in the office 
are reaching alarming propor- 
tions. For many years, only large 
corporations were able to afford 
PBX (private branch extension) 
systems with facilities to restrict 
the use of certain numbers. How- 
ever, now you can build an inex- 
pensive, microprocessor-con- 
trolled, integrated telephone line 
controller that can selectively re- 
strict outgoing calls, selectively 
restrict incoming calls, selec- 
tively dial an array of numbers for 
promotions, and record all ac- 
tivities on the telephone line, in- 
cluding the time, date, and 
duration of each call. 

The controller uses an IBM PC 
or clone as a host. However, the 
card is almost a stand-alone de- 
vice. It includes its own micro- 
processor and runs its own 
operating program. The comput- 
er is needed to load the operating 
program into the controller's 
static RAM, to initialize opera- 
tions, and to let the user interact 
with the controller. The host 
computer may access the SRAM 
for reloading firmware, sending 
and retrieving data, and alternat- 
ing modes and functions. An in- 
ternal power supply allows the 
line controller to operate even 
when the host computer is 
turned off 

The line controller does not 
have to be installed on the phone 
line at the point of entry to re- 
strict outgoing calls and screen 
unwanted incoming calls. The 
card can be plugged into a modu- 



lar telephone out- 
let at any point 
along the indoor 
phone line, without 
any modification of the 
existing installation '" — 

How it works 

The controller is fully program- 
mable and can perform a wide 
variety of functions. Using the 
software provided on the RE 
BBS, the controller can prevent a 
number from being dialed if the 
prefix matches a number on your 
"list to restrict" (see Fig. 2). If. for 
example, the list contains the 
number 9311, then dialing 
931-1882 (or 931-lxxx) wiU be 
prevented. A list containing 0-9 
will prevent all outside calls, and 
a list containing 0, 1, 20, 21, 30, 
31, 40. 41. ..90, 91 will prevent 
the use of all area codes, operator, 
and international. The list can 
consist of up to 128 prefixes, up 
to 6 digits each. 

The user may choose to have 
the controller automatically list 
all outgoing calls made on the 
computer screen. The list will 
consist of the destination tele- 
phone number, date, time, and 
duration of each call. 

The user can screen incoming 
calls and limit them to as many 
as 32 relatives and friends. En 
that case, the card would have to 
be used in conjunction with a 
telephone answering machine. 
The answering machine would 
prompt the caller to enter his own 
number. Then, only the numbers 
that match one on the list will be 
allowed to go through. Any 



TELEPHONE-LINE 
CONTROLLER 



Take full control of 

incoming and 

outgoing 

teiepiione 

calls. 

MORDECHAI SAAD 




matching number, 

along with time and date, will be 

stored in memory for later use. 

The user can then make a list of 

the incoming calls appear on the 

screen. 

The card can be used to auto- 
matically dial a number from the 
keyboard, a number selected 
from a menu, or a pre-selected 
range of numbers. The redial 
function is not limited to the last 
dialed nuinber, as the user may 
select a number from a list of pre- 
viously dialed numbers. 

Circuitry 

The line controller contains a 
microprocessor, memory to hold 
the software and data, interface 
circuitry for the host computer, a 
telephone line interface, and a 
wall transformer to maintain 
power when the host computer is 
off. 

A schematic of the circuit is 
shown in Fig. 3. In the center of 
the diagram is the micro- 
processor (IC6. a 65SC02). 
which is an 8-bit CMOS version 
of the 6502 used in Apple, Atari. 
Commodor, and other comput- 
ers. The static memory 1C4, is an 
8K X 8 SRAM. The host computer 
is used to write the program to 
IC4. The bi-directional tri-state 
buffer (IC5 ] is enabled by the pro- 



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37 



Join 
the 



Electronics and 
Control Engineers' 
Book 
Club® 




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Pirst sell 


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jctlon here 















Signature . 
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BATTERY BACKUP 
(OPTIOMW.) 



115 VAC 
OUTLET 




TLC 
SOFTWARE 



MODULAR 

TELEPHONE 

OUTLET 



FIG. 1— THE ADD-ON-CARD can be plugged into a modular telephone outlet at any point 


along the indoor phone line, without any modification to the existing installation. 


1/ 25 Becords 


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lescription 








1 




6 




OperatoT' 








2 




1 




Long Disiance 








3 




21 




Long Bistsfice 








1 4 




21 




lofig BistancG 








5 




38 




Long Distance 








; 6 




31 




Long Distance 








1 7 




48 




Long Distance 








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FIG. 2— THE CONTROLLER CAN PREVENT a numtjer from being dialed if the prefix 
matches a number on your "list to restrict." 



cessor on pin 1 (the direction pin) 
according to whether the host 
computer wants to read i'rom or 
write to the SRAM. Components 
C16. Rl, and D3 provide the pro- 
cessor with a power-on reset. 

The peripheral interface adapt- 
er (PIA) IC3 is responsible for syn- 
chronizing the control of the 



buses between the host pro- 
cessor (80xx) and the controller's 
6502. The DTMF (dual-tone 
multi-frequency) transceiver. 
IC7. is constantly monitoring the 
telephone line for DTMF ac- 
tivities, as well as for incoming 
calls. When dialing, the trans- 
ceiver generates DTMF signals. 



Resistors R17 and R18 set the 
gain of 1C7 to 1, C24 provides AC 
coupling for the Incoming sig- 
nals, and DIO and Dll are 4.3 
volt-Zener diodes; when con- 
nected back to back they limit the 
voltage swing on the secondary of 
Tl to 5 volts (4.3-f-0.7), thereby 
protecting IC7 and ICll from 
voltage transients. The transmit- 
ter output of the DTMF trans- 
ceiver is buffered by ICll-b to 
drive the 600-ohm line trans- 
former Tl. ICll-b is configured as 
an inverting amplifier with a gain 
of 1. By connecting the non-in- 
verting input to a reference volt- 
age of 2.5 volts, the output swing 
can extend to both rails, centered 
around 2.5 volts. 

The other side of Tl's second- 
ary is connected to the output of 
ICll-a which is configured as a 
voltage follower to buffer the volt- 
age reference of IC7, and is also 
used as a return for the line 
transformer Tl. The on-chip 
clock oscillator of 1C7 uses a 
3. 58- MHz crystal, and the output 
is coupled to the input of 4-bit 
binary counter lC8-a via C21. 
The first-stage output of the 
counter is the source of the 1.79- 
MHz clock for the processor. The 
fourth bit of ICB-a outputs 224 
kHz, which IC8-b divides down to 
14 kHz. The 14-state counter, 
IC9. divides the 14 kHz by 1024 
down to 13.65 Hz, which is the 
real-time clock. The 13.65-Hz 
clock signal is used to tag events 
such as outgoing calls, incoming 
calls, and duration of calls, with a 
relative time and date. The host 
computer converts it to absolute 
time and date. 

Varistors R27-R29 are used as 
surge suppressors, preventing 
the tip and ring terminals from 
exceeding a differential potential 
of 150 volts with respect to chas- 
sis ground and to each other. 
Bridge-rectifier BR2 is used to 
correctly polarize the telephone 
line on its way to the line-status 
and -control circuitry. The ring- 
detector circuitry is connected 
directly to tip and ring. It detects 
an AC signal greater than 100 
volts p-p. Capacitor CI 8 blocks 
the 48-volts DC from opto-cou- 
pler IClS's LED, and Rll limits 
the LED's current. 

When a ring signal is present, 
the opto-coupler's output tran- 
sistor is on, which causes 026 to 



42 




YOU CAN MAKE YOUR OWN PC BOARD for the telephone line controller. This pattern is 
for the component side o1 the board. 



discharge, pulling the in- 
put of IClO-d to ground. 
The processor reads the 
output of [ClO-d (high 
when ringing) into data 
line DO by enabling ICl. 
Resistor RIO charges C26 
at a rate where the brief 
pauses between rings will 
not reach the threshold of 
IClO-d, thereby main- 
taining IClO-d's output 
high. 

Schmitt trigger IClO-e 
and IC14 allow the con- 
troller to "pick-up, " or get 
on line. The processor 
sets the input of IClO-e. 
The output of IClO-e then 
drives the LED part of 
opto-coupler IC14 to 
ground via R7. The tran- 
sistor part of IC14 then 
turns on, driving Q3. At 
this point, the following 
components are con- 
ducting the loop current 
in a clockwise order: R13, 
'A of BR2, Q3, LEDl, R9, 
'/4 of BR2, andR12. LEDl 
is there only to indicate 
that the controller has 
"picked-up." 

A circuit made up of 
transistors Ql and 92, 
IC13, and IClO-c con- 
tinually monitors the 
telephone line. When any 
telephone on the line is 
picked up, the voltage be- 
tween the tip and ring 
drops from 48- to 7-voIts 
DC and, as a result. Q2 
turns off. Transistor Ql 
then turns on, turning 
on the transistor in the 
opto-coupler IC13, caus- 
ing the output of IClO-c 
to go high. That tells the 
processor that somebody 
is on the line. The pro- 
cessor reads that signal 
on data line Dl via ICL 
IClO-a and -b provide the 
internal microprocessor 
with a reset pulse on 
power up, and on bus- 
transfer command. 

The card can get its 
power from the host com- 
puter via D2, at least 
while the host computer 
is in operation, and the 
external wall transformer 
is not connected. The ex- 
istence of external power 



43 



g RADIO-ELECTRONICS 



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FIG. 4— PARTS-PLACEMENT DIAGRAM. The card is assembled on a double-sided PC 
board that fits in an expansion slot on your motherboard. 



All resistors are Va-watt, 2%, un- 
less otherwise indicated. 

R1, R2, RIO, R17, R18— 100,000 

ohms 
R3 — 51,000 ohms 
R4-R6— 1 megohm 
R7— 5100 Ohms 
R8— 4700 Ohms 
R9 — 300 ohms, Vi-watt 
R1 1—2200 ohms 
R12, R13— 5100 Ohms 
R14 — 3000 Ohms 
R15, R24-^6,000 ohms 
R16, R20— 10,000 Ohms 
R19 — 2 megohms 

R21, R22, R25, R26— 33.000 ohms 
R23— 390 Ohms 
R27-R29— P7056 125-volt surge 

suppressor 

Capacitors 

C1-C11, CI 3, CI 4, C25— 0.22 p.F, 50 

volts, ceramic 
012 — 470 jjtR 25 volts, electrolytic 
C1&— 220 (xR 10 volts, electrolytic 
C16— 1000 pF, 100 volts, ceramic 
CI 7 — 0.47 fjLp, 50 volts, ceramic 
C18— 0.22 H-F, 250 volts 
C19— 1 jjlR 250 volts 
C20, C21— 0.01 |jlR 100 volts, 

ceramic 
C22, C23— 0.1 jxR 50 volts, ceramic 
C24— 0.015 jjiR 100 volts, ceramic 
026— 4.7 ti.R 25 voits, electrolytic 



PARTS LIST 

Semiconductors 

101— 74HC244 octal tri-state buffer 
102— 74HC541 octal tri-state buffer 
t03— S26041 interface adapter 
104— V62C64 8Kx 8 SRAIVf 
1C5— 74HC245 octal transceiver 
106— 65SC02 8-bit microprocessor 
107— SI 8062 DTIvlF processor 
108— 74HC393 dual 4-stage counter 
IC9— 74HC40K) 14-state counter 
IC10— 74HC14 hex Schmitt trigger 
1011- LlylC660 quad op-amp 
1012— LK/!2940OT-5 -h5-volt 

regulator 
iC13, IC15— 4N32 optoisolator 
iC14— H11D-2 optoisolator 
BR1, BR2— DB103 bridge rectifier 
D2, D3, D5, D13— 1N4148 switching 

diode 
D'J— 1N5253B 25-volt Zener diode 
D1, D6-D9, D12— not used 
D10, D11— 1N4731A 4.3-volt Zener 

diode 
LED1— P300 light-emitting diode 

(any color) 
Q1, Q2— IRFD210 N-channel hex 

DIP 
Q3— MPSA43 H.V. NPN transistor 
Other components 
J1 — H9032 modular connector 
J2— 8926 747844-1 female D-sub- 

miniature connector 
T1— 42HL016 600/600-ohm 

transfomier 
XTAL1— 3.679545-MH2 crystal 




Miscellaneous: PC board, 9-volt 
200-mA AC wall adapter, E09P 
male D-subminiature connector, 
battery holder, PC bracket, hard- 
ware, solder, etc. 

Note: The following items are 
available from AC&C, 717 E. 
Jericho Tpk., Suite 101, Hunt- 
ington Station, N.Y. 11746: A PC 
board (TLC-1) and OGC Re- 
strainer software (on S'A-inch 
floppy disk), $55.00; A wall 
transformer, modular phone 
cord, three connectors, and a 
metal PC mounting bracket 
$36.00; all the above mentioned 
items, and all components in- 
cluding semiconductors, re- 
sistors, capacitors, and op- 
toelectronics devices; $198.00. 
Be sure to add $5.50 to any order 
for shipping and handling. For 
technical information, write to 
AC&C, and please include a self- 
addressed stamped envelope. 
AC&C is constantly adding soft- 
ware functions for the entire 
product line, and for those with 
unique applications, AC&C is 
ready to work on your custom 
software requirements. 



m 

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m 
m 

3) 

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ta 

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ir THIS IS THE FOIL PATTERN for the solder side of the telephone line controller PC board. 



(AC line transformer, and 

or battery backup) is de- 
tected by ICIl-d, in order 
to alert the user before 
shutting off power on the 
host computer Resistors 
R24 and R22 are set to 
provide the non-invert- 
ing input of ICll-dwith 
2.39 volts. 

When external power 
exists, the cathode of D2 
is at 5 volts. When exter- 
nal power does not exist, 
the voltage drops to 4.3 
volts: resistors R25 and 
R26 divide the voltage by 
2, to 2.5 and 2.15 respec- 
tively, to drive the invert- 
ing input of ICll-d. The 
output, therefore, will go 
high when the external 
power does not exist and 
vice- versa. The 5-volt reg- 
ulator IC12 provides the 
circuits with power as 
long as it is supplied with 
at least 6.5-volts DC or 7 
volts AC RMS. 

A provision has been 
made for future interface 
with external hardware 
on a three-line serial com- 
munication; see pins 2—4 
of connector J2. Also, 
ground and V^c is 
brought to pins 1 and 5 
respectively. The connec- 
tion of a battery to pin 7 is 
optional; when used, it 
ensures proper operation 
during power Interrup- 
tions. 

Construction 

Construction of the 
card is straightforward. 
Figure 4 shows a parts- 
placement diagram. The 
PC board can be made 
from the foil patterns pro- 
vided, or you can pur- 
chase one from the 
source mentioned in the 
parts list. When building 
the board, just be sure to 
install the IC's last, as 
they are more susceptible 
to damage than the other 
components. The only 
other thing that needs ex- 
plaining is the bracket 
that holds the card down 
in the computer. You 
must take a "blank" IBM- 
(Continued on page 82) 



46 



DATA DISKS: 

HIGH SPEED 
DEVICE 
SELECTION 
FOR THE 90'S 



ED PRESTWOOD* 

TRADITIONALLY. DEVICE SELECTION 

involved paging through hard 
copy selection guides and data 
books until a suitable device was 
located. Now. with the revolution 
in electronic data processing, the 
technical community is quickly 
moving toward high-speed com- 
puter-assisted software for select- 
ing semiconductors arid other 
electrical components. The pro- 
cess is not only faster and sim- 
pler. It also results in better 
device selections. 

Wliat began as a simple foray 
into PC -assisted device selection 
is rapidly becoming the preferred 
method of device selection by to- 
day's engineers. For one thing, 
data disks routinely save users 
hours in the device- select ion pro- 
cess. Second, and perhaps even 
more important, there's a tre- 
mendous cost advantage for en- 
gineers to design in components 
that not only perform well, but 
are cost-effective as well. Select- 
ing the ideal device at the best 
price often results in the savings 
of thousands of dollars for com- 
panies that take the time to op- 
timize their designs. Some com- 
panies are even using data disks 
to find better, less expensive re- 
placements for components in 
existing designs. 

What are data disks? 

Data disks are selection guides 
on floppy disks. Manufacturers 
are now providing data disks to 

•Ed Prestwood is president of CybersoR, 
Inc. . a Tbmpe, AZ company specializing i n 
the production of data disks. 





customers as a supplement to 
conventional literature to speed 
up and simplify the device selec- 
tion process. Data disks are not 
intended or designed to replace 
data sheets; instead, they are 
computer-assisted selection 
guides that recommend several 
suitable devices for the user's ap- 
plication. They run on popular 
PC's and help users select the ide- 
al device or product for their ap- 
plication in seconds rather than 
minutes or even hours. Some 
data disks integrate cross refer- 
ence support for as many as 
27,000 competitive devices. 



Finding tfie right 

component for a 

particular application 

is easier than ever, 

with the help of 

today's data disks. 



After the data disk recom- 
mends several suitable candi- 
dates, it's up to the user to obtain 
the appropriate data sheet to 
make a final intelligent selection. 
To make it easier to order the 
proper literature, some disks 
even contain listings of technical 
literature for the devices on the 
disk. The Motorola data disk, for 
instance, lists every application 
note, article reprint, engineering 
bulletin, training course, data 
sheet, and data book available for 
over 13,000 integrated circuits 
and discrete semiconductors. 

What do data disks do? 

One of the simplest functions 
provided by these electronic se- 
lection guides is the part number 
search. Users enter the device 
number they are interested in, 
press the Enter key, and the pro- 
gram conducts the search. When 
the part is found, all information 
concerning it is displayed. The 
more sophisticated disks auto- 
matically search every product 
category on the disk for a spec- 



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ified part number. A useful varia- 
tion of the part number search is 
the partial part number search. 
In a partial device number search 
(also called a substring search), 
the user enters a portion of a de- 
vice number — "6800," for in- 
stance. The program then locates 
every device that contains "6800" 
somewhere in its part number 
and displays the list in a tabular 
format on the screen. One similar 
feature is called the complemen- 
tary device number search. This 
option will locate the electrical 
complement for any discrete de- 
vice specified by the user. 

A few of the currently available 
data disks provide a useful cross- 
referencing feature. If the spec- 
ified part number isn't on the 
disk, the program automatically 
looks for it in a special cross-ref- 
erence file. If it's listed, the soft- 
ware automatically looks up the 
manufacturer's equivalent device 
and displays the information for 
that device. Some data disks tell 
users if the cross-reference de- 
vice is a "similar replacement" or 
a "direct replacement." The Har- 
ris Op Amps data disk even tells 
users about the pin-to-pin com- 
patibility and the degree of elec- 
trical equivalency. The Harris 
disk also provides comments re- 
garding the suitability of the de- 
vice as a substitute for the 
requested device number. 

For most users, the most valu- 
able capability of data disks is the 
parametric search function. 
After this function is selected, 
the program displays a menu of 
parameters for the devices in the 
selected product category. Users 
then select the parameters for 
their application from a menu 
and enter minimum or max- 
imum values appropriate for 
their application. Some data 
search disks provide pop-up 
menus that list choices for pa- 
rameters such as package, tem- 
perature range, Zener voltage, 
etc. After entering the values, 
pressing a single key will display 
aU the devices that meet or ex- 
ceed the specified requirements. 

Like any good spreadsheet, the 
better data disks allow users to 
conduct "what if?" sessions. 
High-end data disks, such as 
those developed by CyberSoft. ac- 
tually remember the previous pa- 
rametric search and permit 
users to conduct the search over 



and over, "tweaking" just one or 
two parameters with each pass. 
That permits users to make 
whatever compromises are nec- 
essary to optimize the cost-per- 
formance tradeoffs. 

Data disks also provide a host 
of other features, such as the 
ability to limit searches to mili- 
tary components, surface mount 
components, or military surface 
mount components. Many data 
disks include a printable "Infor- 
mation Request Form" so that 
users can order technical liter- 
ature and sample devices. Most 
data disks also contain sales of- 
fice and/or distributor contact 
lists. Help files, screen-color util- 
ities, and printer utilities (in- 
cluding network and spooler 



support) are also available on 
some disks. The Burr-Brown 
data disk even has a provision for 
displaying new product informa- 
tion that users can download 
from the Burr-Brown BBS in Tbc- 
son, Arizona. Thoughtful man- 
ufacturers also include a phone 
number for users to call to obtain 
the latest versions of their data 
disks. Many offer free subscrip- 
tion services. 

Are all disks created equal? 

By no means. Several of the 
data disks available today are 
highly polished, professional 
software packages. A few, how- 
ever, carry the mark of the novice. 
The differences matter little, 
however, when a manufacturer 




SOME AVAILABLE DATA DISKS 



Analog Devices 

Two Technology Way 
Norwood. MA 02062 
Bill Schweber (617) 329-4700 

CIRCLE 225 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



Best Power Technology 
P.O. Box 280 
Necedah, Wl 54646 
Literature Center fSOO) 356-5794 
CIRCLE 226 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



Bourns 

1200 Columbia Avenue 

Riverside, CA 92507 

Customer Service (714) 781-5500 

CIRCLE 227 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



Burr- Brown 

P.O. Box 11400 
Tucson, AZ 86734 
Customer Support (800) 548-6132 
CIRCLE 228 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Guttler- Hammer 
Dept H293 
4201 N. 27th Street 
Milwaukee Wl 53216 
Diane Nuesslein (800) 833-3927 
CIRCLE 229 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Equipto 

351 Woodiawn Avenue 
Aurora IL 60506 

Customer Service (708) 897-4691 
CIRCLE 230 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Harris Semiconductors 

P.O. Box 883, M/S CB-1-25 
Melbourne, FL 32901 
Literature Center (407) 724-3739 

CIRCLE 231 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



Lambda 

515 Broad Holiow Road 
Melville, NY 11747 
Customer Service (800) 526-2324 
CIRCLE 232 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Motorx^la 

RO, Box 20924 

Phoenix, AZ 85036 

Literature Center (800) 521-6274 

CIRCLE 233 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Newport 

RO. Box 8020 
Fountain Valley, CA 92728 
Technical Hotline (714) 965-5406 
CIRCLE 234 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Philips Components 

George Washington Hwy. 
Smithfield, Rl 02917 
Cindy Taylor (401) 232-0500 
CIRCLE 235 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Precision Monolithics 

1500 Space Parit Drive 
Santa Clara, CA 95052 
Ulerature Center (800) 843-1515 

CIRCLE 23S ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Titan Severe Environments 

20151 Nordhotf Street 
Cathsworth, CA91311 
John Van Putten (818)709-7117 

CIRCLE 237 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Western Digital 

17900 Von Karman Ave. 

Irvine, CA 92714 

Literature Center (800)832-4778 

CIRCLE 238 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Xentek 

RO. Box 1987 

Vista, CA 92083 

Larry Merchell (619)727-0940 

CIRCLE 239 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



46 



has the only data disk tor their 
given product line. But with new 
disks becoming available every 
few weeks, the competition to 
provide the most convenient and 
powerful user interface is inten- 
sifying. All the manufacturers 
mentioned here have improved 
their disks with each new revi- 
sion. It may seem ironic, but to- 
day and throughout the 90*s, the 
battle for share-of-mind will be 
fought and won on the basis of 



ftlliK CMfcnwti 



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DJticHtr>3 typM 



II IBlttfl-tltBt 






FIG. 1— THE MAIN MENU from Philips 
Components' Discrete Semiconductors 

Transistors data disk. 

the ease of selection rather than 
solely on the reputation of the 
manufacturer. 

A few of the data disks available 
today provide automatic multi- 
level sort capability, which is a 
definite advantage in today's 
competitive market. CyberSoft, 
Inc. introduced the multi-level 
sort feature when it developed 
the first Motorola data disk in 
1987. The multi-level sorting al- 
gorithm sorts each and every col- 
umn selected by the user It sorts 
on the first selected parameter, 
the second parameter, the third, 
and so on across all the param- 
eters selected by the user. The 
procedure takes place in milli- 
seconds and assures users that 
the absolute best device in the 
database for the specified ap- 
plication is always Usted first, 
and so on. 

The automatic multi-level sort 
is arguably the very best way to 
display data. A less useful com- 
promise to the automatic multi- 
level sort is the manual column- 
by-column sort that users can 
conduct after the search has 
been completed. 

One feature users should be 
aware of is called the "early- 
abort" search algorithm. Some 
data disks search their databases 
and abort the search after a spec- 
ified number of devices are lo- 
cated (10 and 15 are common 



numbers). That's an awful ap- 
proach to searching a database. 
since the 16th device- — or the 
2,016th, for that matter — may be 
the ideal device for the specified 
application. Look for disks that 
search the entire database for pa- 
rameters selected by the user, 
then report back the total 
number of "hits." The best way 
for the software to "know" how 
many devices meet the user's re- 
quirements is by searching the 
entire database. 

Another very useful feature 
that separates the men from the 
boys is called parameter queu- 
ing. That is, the program auto- 
matically displays the param- 
eters in the same sequence that 
the user selected them in. If a 
user selects rpgj^,^, as his or her 



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I. CnwiiLEihcw Cirttiits 



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0. mait 



9 tining Circuits 



CqniTDl FunclLom 



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f Prtii fttfl jiifirl iCTWfi: frtnM Tbt ujIdps 

* htt» IS fv P^rtviM scrwi. Ijfor Ltit Sctht: Ij tzr Hiin nm. 

FIG. 2— MOTOROLA'S IC data disk gives 
access to a wide variety ot product cate- 
gories. 

most important parameter, it is 
displayed in the first column. 
Likewise, if the user specifies 
breakdown voltage as the second 
most important parameter, it will 
be displayed in the second col- 
umn. Automatic parameter 
queuing, coupled with automatic 
multi-level sorting, provide users 
with the most useful and conve- 
nient display sequence possible. 
Burr-Brown, Harris, and 
Motorola support both of these 
important features in their data 
disks. 

Data disks also vary greatly in 
the amount of data they store. 
The number of devices is not a 
reliable indicator of the amount 
of information contained on the 
disk because there may be only 
five or six columns of informa- 
tion available for each device, 
CyberSoft, who developed the 
Burr-Brown, Harris, Motorola, 
Titan, and Western Digital data 
disks, supports up to 64 columns 
of data for every device, which 
can add up to a lot of data, A final 



consideration when gauging the 
amount of information on a disk 
is the number of cross references 
supported. Motorola's data 
search disk contains well over 
25,000 cross-references, which 
can be a great convenience for de- 
signers and technicians alike. 

Some data disks include pric- 
ing information. Most engineers 
insist on seeing price informa- 
tion, even if it's only "ball park" 
pricing. Relative pricing greatly 
simplifies designing to a budget. 
If two devices will work in a spec- 
ified application and one costs 
half as much as the other, it gen- 
erally pays to take a good look at 
the less expensive component. 
Some disks, like the Titan Data 
disk, provide users with volume 
pricing based on the quantities 
ordered. 

One other feature that appears 
only on high-end data disks is 
footnote support. All too often, a 
device that looks ideal may be in- 
appropriate because of some sub- 
tle characteristic that isn't ob- 
vious by looking at the tabular 

Ibbii iii.tii;:iiiimii«iiii,ui;it.-iitSTOi;aii!iMia m\ 



Firiiwsf .mstcK 

Iyp« of Solulicn Erjftucs 

Bivict l^HCTipt jffi . . . ,&tinad US Coitii Ulf 
EK^ro3&9J jCN6 

liBl JStt^lllfel ., 

Blttriil H»l 



I ] il ' Biin llwn- a ' hinl- t ' Htlj. 1 = Dii- StTm. S 'U\t. j 

FIG.3— A SAMPLE DEVICE INFORMA- 
TION screen from Western Digital's data 
disk. 



data itself. All data disks de- 
veloped by CyberSoft provide ex- 
tensive footnoting capabilities. 

Another important thing to 
look for in a data disk is good 
customer support. Some compa- 
nies, like Burr-Brown, Motorola, 
and Western Digital, are placing 
their data disks onto corporate 
Bulletin Boards so users can 
download their latest data disk 
{ and/or new product updates) in 
minutes. Others, like Equipto, 
provide a dedicated customer ser- < 
vice number that users can call, f^ 
Within minutes, Equipto sends ^ 
FAX information on any compo- g 
nent covered in their data disk to ra 
their customers, Equipto's disk, i 
coupled with their dedicated sup- 5 
port line, has not only dramat- c 



ically increased sales leads, it's 
also propelled Ihem into a record 
sales year. 

Who's offering data disks? 

Over the past four years, a 
number of companies have pro- 
vided data disks to their custom- 
ers. Disks are distributed at 
trade shows, technical colleges 
and universities, and through 
"shareware" catalogs. More and 
more of the 6,000+ bulletin 
board services across the United 
States have data disks waiting to 
be downloaded at no charge. The 
following list shows a sampling of 
the data disks that are free for the 
asking. 

• Analog Devices — This disk pro- 
vides pricing information and 
covers Analog Devices' line of op 
amps and data conversion cir- 
cuits. Disks containing SPICE 
emulation models for Analog De- 
vices op amps are under develop- 
ment and will soon be available. 

• Best Power Technology — ^This 
disk, available in English, 
French, German, or Spanish, is a 
"brochure-on-a-floppy" for their 
broad line of computer- grade un- 
interruptible power supplies. 

• Bourns — Bourns "Selectrim" 
data disk provides coverage for 
Bourns' complete line of trimmer 
potentiometers. 

• Burr-Brown — This data disk 
covers Burr-Brown's entire line 
of op amps, instrumentation 
amplifiers, isolation amplifiers, 
analog circuit functions, D/Aand 
A/D converters, analog circuit 
multiplexers, sample/hold ampli- 
fiers, voltage-to-frequency con- 
verters, and data-acquisition 
components. 

• Cuttler-Hammer — Billed by the 
company as an "Expert System" 
program, this data search disk 
leads specifiers through a series 
of pertinent questions that re- 
sults ultimately in the recom- 
mendation of the appropriate 
photoelectric or proximity trans- 
ducer for a given specified ap- 
plication. 

• Equipto — ^The Equipto disk in- 
corporates more graphics than 
most data disks. It helps users 
speciiy the optimal modular en- 
closure (including vertical racks 
and slope front consoles) for elec- 
tronic equipment. Also includes 
computer furniture, instrument 
cabinets, and EMI/RFI shielded 
enclosures. 



• Harris — Harris' first entry in 
the data disk arena covers their 
broad line of operational ampli- 
fiers, including devices from the 
recent merger of GE, RCA, and 
Intersil. Look for additional Har- 
ris product lines to be added 
soon. A disk containing SPICE 
macro models for several Harris 
op amps is also available. 

• Lambda — Lambda offers a 
disk covering their broad line of 
AC-DC switching and linear 
power supplies, DC-DC power 
supplies and converters, sup- 
plies for laboratory and test 
equipment, power semiconduc- 
tors and power systems. It also 
includes pricing information. 

• Motorola — Motorola offers two 
IBM disks containing all the se- 
lection guide information for 
both IC's and discretes. These 
disks operate stand-alone or in 
concert when copied onto a hard 
drive. This disk is also available 
on a single microfloppy for Mac- 
intosh PC's. It features 124 prod- 
uct categories, 13,000 device 
numbers, 27,000 competitive 
cross references, and half a mil- 
lion parameters. Motorola also of- 
fers SPICE models for their 
power MOSFET's and scatter pa- 
rameters for selected small signal 
RF devices. 

• Newport — The Newport Optics 
Catalog on a floppy features their 
line of optical lenses. Includes 
over 2.100 cross reference prod- 
ucts for several of Newport's ma- 
jor competitors products. 

• Philips Components — This 
cornpany is offering four data 
disks, covering diodes, FET's, 
hybrid amplifiers, optocouplers, 
power MOSFET's, small-signal 
transistors, and trigger devices. 
Competitive cross references and 
pricing are supported. 

• Precision Monolithics — The 
"Precision Decisions" data disk 
provides data for PMl's IC product 
line, including op amps, data 
conversion circuits, and sample 
and hold circuits. Includes prices 
and industry cross references. A 
disk containing SPICE emula- 
tion models is also available. 

• Titan Severe Environment 
Systems — The Titan disk fea- 
tures the company's full line of 
SECS militarized and rug- 
gedized board-level and system 
products, including microcom- 
puters, memory, parallel and se- 
rial interface, bus interface. 



analog, and peripheral controller 
modules. The data disk also in- 
cludes product overviews and 
general pricing information. 

• Western Digital (WD)— Pro- 
vides extensive coverage for WD's 
line of VLSI chip set solutions for 
XT, AT, 386 and 486 PC architec- 
tures, including their Micro- 
channel products. Prints prod- 
uct overviews and provides a 
useful "Related Solutions" sec- 
tion. WD also offers a two-disk set 
of utilities and schematics cap- 
tured using the ORCAD/STD III 
v3.22 software. This data search 
disk set facilitates the develop- 
ment of design solutions based 
on the AT-compatible WD286- 
LPM16 motherboard. 

• Xentek — This disk provides 
pricing information and major 
parameters for Xentek 's line of 
standard linear power supplies. 
Extreme isolation transformers 
and switching power supplies 
will be added in the near future. 

Gimmick or trend? 

Data disks have come a long 
way from the first ones that ap- 
peared in the mid 1980's. What 
may have begun as a marketing 
gimmick is now evolving into a 
useful engineering trend. Tbday's 
data disks cover virtually every 
discrete and IC product category. 
New disks are also covering 
power supplies, sensors, re- 
sistors, VLSI chip sets, plastics, 
and even optics and lasers. 

The major force driving the 
data disk market is that compa- 
nies are motivated to make it as 
easy as possible for customers to 
select and purchase their prod- 
ucts. The thrust and cut of com- 
petition has helped create a 
healthy win-win situation: man- 
ufacturers view their data disks 
as marketing tools; users view 
data disks as time-saving engi- 
neering tools. Since introducing 
their first data disk. Equipto re- 
ports an increase in sales leads 
from 12,000 per year to approxi- 
mately 75,000 better qualified 
sales leads per year! That kind of 
result, coupled with increasing 
customer demand for faster, easi- 
er, and better device-selection 
tools will continue to assure the 
proliferation of data disks. For 
more information, contact 
CyberSoft, Inc., at 1820 W Drake 
Drive, Suite 108. Tempe. AZ 
85283, [602)491-0022. R-E 



52 



LAST MONTH WIC FINISHED BUILDING THE MOTWERBOAIiD AND THE 

motor-controller board. Then we covered the operating theory 
of the power board. So. now let's get to building whalever we 
haven't covered yet. including the control panel, power board, 
and mechanical assembly. 

Construction 

Fabricate an aluminum sheet-metal enclosure lo house 
the control-panel electronics: we showed you how to 
wii'e everything las I month. 

As for the manual controller, drill holes in a 
plastic box to accommodate the compo 
nents; we showed you a schematic of the 
controller last month. Feed the ribbon 
cable through a hole on the side of 
the plastic box and put a knot on 
the inside of the box so that the 
wire can't be pulled through. 
Fasten the top cover to the box 
and atlach the knob to the po- 
tentiometer (PI). 

Power-board construction 

Following Fig, 1. mount 
the following components 
on the solder side (back 
side) of the PC board: 
R42, R52, R54. D7-D9. 
D20-D29. and all E-ier- 
minals (they are basical- 
ly solder posts that allow 
you to solder heavy- 
gauge wire to the PC 
board). Those compo- 
nents are mounted on 
the solder .side in order 
to create more space for 
the other component.s. It 
is probably a good idea to 
add a '/n-lnc'h piece of 
sleeving insulation to the 
leads of those components 
before assembly (willi the ex- 
ception of the E-termlnals). 
That will prevent any accidental 
shorting of the exposed compo- 
nent leads. After they are installed, 
trim the component leads. Now In- 
stall the remaining parts on the com- 
ponent side with the exception ot the 
power MOSFET's. 

The MOSFETs require the instaUatlon of 
heat sinks and insulators before assembly. For 
each MOSFET. place an insulator on the F^C board 
and then cover with a heal sink. (Carefully clip off the 
center lead (drain) of the MOSFET as close to the device body 
ais passible. The lead is not usedbecause the drain connection 
Is also provided by die metal tab on the MOSFET. Bend the 
MOSFET leads at a 90^ angle and insert into the PC board so 
the device lies Hush with the heat sink. Secure (he device and 
heat sink to the PC board with 4-40 hardware. 

The high-current jumpers should now be installed on the 
solder side of the PC board; solder them to the E-terminals. 
Thcjumpcrs are required because the etched traces on the PC 
board can not handle 15—30 amperes. Thejumpers should be 
made of solid insulated 18-gauge wire. Figure 2 illustrates the 
three types of jumpers. Install the jumpers on the solder side 




Let's mow the lawn already— 
rather, let's watch the lawn get 
mowed! 



Build 

the Lav\rn 

tZanger 




RAYMOND RAFAELS 



E2a 



o 

z 
o 
cr 

H 
O 

LXJ 



o 

< 




FIG. 1— PARTS PLACEMENT DIAGRAM for the power board. Remember that several 
components must be mounted on the solder side of the board to leave room for the other 
components (see text). 



of the board as follows: 



TYPE-A JUMPERS 
E-23 to drain of Q8 
E-18 to drain of Q9 
E-20 to drain of Q 10 

E-13 to drain of Q5 
E'lO todrainofQ6 

TYPE-B JUMPERS 
Drain of Q4 to Drain of Q7 
Drain of Q3 to Drain of Q4 
Drain of Q8 to Drain of Q14 
Drain of Q7 to Drain of Q18 
(mount on component side) 
Drain of Q13 to Drain of 914 
(mount on component side) 

TYPE-C JUMPERS 
E-23 to E-21 
E-18 to Jll-10 
E-19 to Jn-8 
E-20 to Jl 1-9 
E-17to Jn-8 
E-14 to E-15 
E-15 to E-16 
E-13to JU-7 
E-10 to Jll-6 
E-12 to E-11 
E-11 to E-7 
J21-23 to J 11-3 
E-6 to E-8 
E-2 to E-6 
E-5 to Jll-2 
E-1 to E-17 
E-1 to E-9 
E-3 to E-4 
E-22 to JU-4 
E-22 to Jll-5 

Grass-sensor assembly 

Build the mechanical portion 




TYPE-B JUMPER 



FIG. 2— HERE ARE THETHREE TYPES OF 
JUMPERS. They are used to handle the 
high currents that exist on the power 
board. 

of the sensor assembly as shown 
in Fig. 3, and wire the grass sen- 
sors themselves as shown in Fig. 
4. The length of the ribbon cable 
that connects the sensor assem- 
bly to Jl on the motor-controUer 
board should be approximately 
3'/2 feet long. Crimp Jl onto the 
end of the ribbon cable using an 
IDC crimping tool or vise. 

Power-board testing 

Inspect all solder joints and 
jumper connections to ensure 
that everything is properly as- 
sembled. Place the power board 
on a flat surface (not plugged into 
the motherboard} and tem- 
porarily jumper Jl 1-3, Jll-8, and 
J21-44 with clip leads. Now con- 
nect the + 24-voIt input to the PC 
board through Jll-4 ( + ) and 
Jll-3 (ground). You should hear 
the relay "click" on. Measure the 
DC voltages at J21-32, J21-18, 



J21-30, J21-31. and J21-19. The 
voltage readings should match 
the values listed on the sche- 
matic diagram that we showed 
you last month. If all the voltages 
read correctly, the DC/DC con- 
verters are working properly. Re- 
move the test clip leads from the 
PC board. 

Mechanical assembly 

Figure 3 shows the mechanical 
assembly of the Lawn Ranger. Al- 
though it does not include all of 
the details, detailed mechanical 
drawings can be purchased from 
Technical Solutions. However, 
the chances are that you won't 
follow the original plans exact- 
ly — just as long as you follow the 
general layout. Also, make sure 
that the cutting section is safely 
constructed, and that the blade 
shield protects the cutting deck a 
full 360 degrees. WARNING— The 
cutting blades should not be con- 
nected until it has been proven 
that the Lawn Ranger has been 
properly constructed, is fully 
functional, and safe. 

Many of the mechanical parts 
are available from various man- 
ufacturers listed in Table 1. The 
rest of the mechanical compo- 
nents shown in Fig. 3 are not 
avaiiable from TBI; you must ei- 
ther fabricate them yourself or 
have a local machine shop make 
them for you. 



WHAT'S BEEN COVERED 

This series on the Lawn Ranger 
began in the June issue. In that 
issue, we covered the general op- 
eration of the unit, the software, 
and we discussed and built the 
CPU board. 

In the July issue, we went over 
the electronic control system, the 
motor controller board, DA con- 
verter circuitry, grass-sensor cir- 
cuitry, motherboard, and velocity- 
feedback loops. We gave you the 
parts lists for the motor-controller 
board and the motherboard, al- 
though we didn't get to build them 
that month. 

In August, we began with the 
construction of the motherboard 
and the motor-controller board. 
Then we covered the operation of 
the power board, drive motors, 
cutting motors, hand-held control- 
ler, and the Lawn Ranger's elec- 
tronic control panel. 

In this issue we have finished up 
the series. We hope you have 
found it to be an interesting and 
worthwhile project. R-E 



54 



BEctrnmcs® 



VOL. 1 NO. 1 




Executive Offices 

Larry Steckler, 

EHF, CET, Publisher 
Arline Fishman, 

Advertising Director 
500-B Bi-County Blvd. 
Farmingdale, NY 11735 

1-516-293-3000 
FAX 1-516-293-3115 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 

Joe Shere 
P.O. Box 169 
Idyllwild, CA 92349 
1-714-659-9743 
FAX 1-714-659-2469 



CLOSING DATES: 

Reservitl«ns Final Film 
)ssu« In H.Y. In K.Y. 

Sept. 1990 June 11, 1990 June 18, 1990 

Nov. Aug. 13 Aug. 20 

Jan. 1991 Oct. 15 Oct. 22 

Mar. Dec. 13 Dec. 20 

May Feb. 13, 1 991 Feb. 20, 1 991 



CERNSBACK 

PUBLICAMON 



ADVERTISERS INDEX 



Alfa Electronics 28 

All Electronic 8 

Andralech 32 

B.G. Micro . , 35 

Battery Tech 32 

Becktron 16 

The Book Source 6 

Caico International 16 

Command Productions 21 

Computer Disk Service 30 

Consumertronics 24 

d b Computer Products 14 

D&D 17 

Datbani Corporation 13 

Davilyn 7 

E.T Tech, Inc 26 

Electric Raintiow 23 

Electrified Discountei^ 11 

Electronic Goldmine 19 

Electronics Parts Outlet 26 

Electronics Clearing House 30 

Electronics 12 3 18 

Gems Computers, Inc 33 

J.R Glaser ,.10 

Gott Electric 4 

Ttie Grapevine Group 36 

Gray Matier 22 

IQ Systems 2 



Information Unlimited , . , 37 

Jensen Tools, Inc 36 

Kelvin Electronics 29 

L-Com, Inc 28 

l^ondo-Tronics, Inc 36 

Needham's Electronics 26 

OWI 20 

Omnitron 27 

P.C. Boards 22 

Pr^C Electronics 20 

Paladin Electronics 34 

Periphex, Inc 30 

Pfeico 25 

Ramsey 3 

Sescom 20 

Sky Vision 40 

Surplus Sales of Nebraska 16 

Surplus Traders 12 

Tanner Electronics 10 

Tecti Ser/ices 34 

Top Sales Co 18 

TransWorld 32 

Ucando 34 

United Electronic Supply 31 

Universal View ^ 39 

Video Repair 24 

Viejo 34 

Walling Co 3fi 



RE-SHOPPER 



THE TymCard® 
$25,000 CHALLENGE 

IQ, Inc., in an attempt to improve the security of it's product, 

offers this challenge: 

IQ, Inc., is about to release an anti-fraud "smart card" called TymCard, to be used by long 
distance telephone companies to help eliminate calling card fraud. We believe our product to 
be unbeatable. To detect any possible flaws in our system. IQ, Inc., is offering a prize of $25,000 
to the first person who can demonstrate that he or she has been able to access the system, at any 
time, by being able to generate a valid code at will. Accessing the system DOES NOT mean 
"breaking" one or more existing TymCards as that only allows temporary and insignificant 
access to the system. 

EXAMPLE :If you knew the numbers of one or more TELCO calling cards, you would be 
able to make long distance calls that woiild be charged to that card - until you were 
discovered -■ and that number was deactivated. If ^however, you had a ''Blue Box', you would 
be able to make calls at aiiy time. You were able to "break the system" without need for any 
calling card numbers. The only permanent solution, as fat as TELCO was concerned, was to 
change the system which, in effect , "deactivated" the Blue Box. 



A condition of this challenge is that you supply to IQ, Inc., the details on how you were able 
to "crack the system" and assist IQ. Inc., to correct the flaw. 

Each respondent to this challenge will be invited to a meeting with members of our staff. At this 
meeting you wiU be given much more technical information about TymCard as well as a 
description of the service. 

Please note that there is absolutely and positively no charge to you to accept this challenge. If 
you desire to "borrow" an ACTIVE TymCard that will allow you to test the system at any time, 
we ask for a $50.00 cash deposit. This deposit will be returned to you, in full, upon the Tym Card 
being returned to IQ,Inc., as agreed. 



If you are interested, please call (818) 592-0423 for information as to the 
time and location of the next meeting. 

^''^ ''' 

NOTE: If jfou are not located in the Los Angeles area please call the number to arrange for complete information 
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tK used as a jEabt« tvne eicoCet Ruai 
cn^tof^voEis 

Comp-lelFl(iE TO-1 S5.95 



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PWDAMf 

Simple Clat$ C pi^wcr amp reaEuf«)l! 
lirnti powergaiit 1 Winlorloul.JW m 
1or15oul.5WinEor43Wo(j1 Ma;( oirljMit 
fli $0 W, ifuif Edible value, compieie wiiri 
all parti. le» cjic aitf T'R relay 

PA-].ViVf pwr amp hji S27.9S 

in 1. RF^insEd TR relay Kil G.95 




SLfUTM 

A supEr sensmve affipSi- 
rufitfticH'AiliptEhupi 
pindropaE^le«1*Crcal 
lor m<o^lEoring baby's 
tt)>t)<mpra$ general pur° 
patEamsliI.Ef Fukl2W 
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ipta^er 

BH9K11 S5,95 

NH2T1RKUU 

r^irkSonS-tSS/K 
low cu^ rent {2£ma'i 
Jrfliini'nionl^ aC-CurKy 

1^X11 55.50 

tB-BAss> $9,95 



&Krmjsiccornea]ive'i3 
di11( rent lights rihCkFr 
wilhmusio dnelighE 
Eaciilor. hign nudrant;^ 
anQFDws. taciiindividU' 
altjradiusEableand 
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OR 110V*C 
Mil Kit $8.^ 



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littprfiv^tlKSWilCtttd 
OUlpUlHrilhCUrfEirlEJ 
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Cand'ivertlayj ligiils. 
LED or even a tape 
lEcorder molar Runson 
9VDC 
VS-UII 

S&.^ 




TELEPMME 
TMlftMirTIH 

LowcDsl With proles ' 
sionaipfjformance Fu- 
lurrsinclude. sell phone 
iinepowerfid, lunabFe 
Irom^EionOlMlHz, 
polarity annsensmvE 
compjctsiJEt ,''xl'-'l 
easily insLAlisanywlHiB 
on me phone line or 
iniidfrEhtinstruirnejil 
lEseti 
Pfl-IKIT 

S 14.95 



yiOEOMOOULArOM 

r TV Ig video moniHN Super 



uonvc'Lianv TV Ig video moniHw Super ^^^ -j^ 
Enable tur^AbleovE^ChJ-^flcnsonS-lW {»f£.3i] 
a-cccptssid video Signal Bt&tuniEArithe 
[JiJrktEiCflmpklekn JM.? 



UIMJIKYKIT 

AlEErhat1SF/ltashK2 

jumooLEOs UielQf 
njmE badges buEtoni. 
ivainingpaiKlliQhl$ 
fiunspmSlolSvalti. 

Si^\^vi S3w95 



ProvKtes the basic parti 
andPCEK>ardrBfluiredHk 
prnvHTeaS'Purceorpre- 
Cis>c»niiinhr4 and pulse 
gEsieral'ron Dies 5f6 
lifPEi'iCaiKiiiKludKa 
range of pans igfmos'l 
limmqnEHJs ^^ 

UMKii M.9S 




Fmrocmit 

F>3^9urll inapploUoni 
orn^iti&yexpertmerii^a^ 
lion Full lt«Jge<l Sllp«r- 
tietrodyncecfiiver. 
m»cr(Fvoli jtnsjtivnty, 
»07*ilHrlF.Lr>tegr4ied 
Circuit deteclor.Umvir 
audio ampliilier.^ 
exleTnalpoinersfhirce. 
operation or stu>dard 
FMbrv^caslbandU 
Will IS large portions 041 
eachside, c:ofnpac:i|ie~ 
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KUHAtTU 

Produces LdUOeir shai- 

lertitgandalEEniiohgeE- 

imgsiiEniikesofjud Can 

supply up tots waits oE 

oPimiiDus audio AiMts 

OnC-lbVDC 

MB I Kit S4.^ 



AnmtEiesticigkil. small 
irnkt picks up sounds 
aridconvEftsthimo 
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SDu lid. ine Siguier ttoE 
l^ht IhEludesmikc, c<Mt- 
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WL-IKit 9O.90 



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anyFMbrfladcasUadPO. 

useSditytypEDi'mikt 

Hunsoh3Jo9VTy0cFM' 

JJiasaddiMJsennEivf 

miStepfEarivpslagt 

FMlJ^n S5.95 

FM.^KI^ $795 



Protluces upward and 
downviirdmil iH 
peaii audio ouipui.fvfu 
Dfl3-fivol1j,ttfei3-45 
Dhmfpealter 

ContplelekFt.SM.B 

$3J5 




A super hignperEcirtriance 
FM wireless milse 1(11' 
tiansmtilsaslablE Signal 
itplo30O¥a4 0swiifi 
ficeplionar audio quality 
bymearisoliisbuMim 
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antEcina lullery ano 
suipennslructians. This <s 
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FM^m SIBJ5 

fM.JWnriiraJTMWl 



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A real liiicrowave 
dopplcr stntor Ihal mil 
dS'tK-taAumanasfiras 
fO tret away OiKrales 
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lOCitnaoutpui.norinal'lv 
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tJVDC 

Complete -,* q- 
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privH^cvt; your tele- 
phoM 0^ radio This 
scnmbiei kii le^Eif m 
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CT-70 7 DIGIT 525 MHz 



CT-KJ 9 DIGtT BOO MHz 





* 139.95 ^"iK^^r' 

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M89.95 



FREQUENCY COUNTERS 



Tver 10 years and ts recofpnized lor lU Itb ouidity prgitucis it brtiVt^ 

^.'irougn pricn Ai I o) our couniKi, carry a bit pnt ytir wranty on 
parts irvd labor we take fi^Eai finde m being the targHt minulac- 
turer o! Igw cost couniers in ihE enlirEUSA Compart ^peci1<calioni. 
Our.counitrs are tult tealurtd, trom^udiO tp jjKF, wiih FET high 
iimpedanu iupvl pepper wave siiaping CEfciiitry and duraliiJe nigh 
quality epoxy glass, ptatfd-thru PC Board conslruclion AH units arc 
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ACCESSORIES FOR COUNTERS 

Telescopic iwhip ajilenna-'BNC plug t tJB 

High impedance probf, tighi tO'idmg IIH 

Low pass probe, audio use till 

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iUitS.>taiituHt«rm<.»t3iuiii> ig 
lifi. • Hi MoA rim H ■nf.ui iva >m miae • 

tlDOl • Inlfi lit ISSk nrUo Ul • Oe M 

u u ^ la uM Mit • Kttrt ■«■ nun IM 

U n • HT roMMl IN 7S uln tu • n (m 
•n ■■»■>■ dtu • 1 pa ml tain 
nMiMiinMipn. 



PHONE ORDERS CALL 

716-924-4560 

FAX 716-924-4555 



RAMSEY ELECTRONICS. INC. 793 Cannlns Parkway. Victor. NY 14564 



GOTT ELECTRONICS 



COMBO PLUS by AST RESEARCH INC. $29.95 

Memory Expansion & I/O Board for IBM PC, XT & Compatibles, reat- 
time Oock-Calendar with battery backun RS-232C Serial port, parallel 
printer port, SuperPak™, SuperSpool™. dock software, and the 
RAM CLEAR memory initialization utility program (available with 64, 
128, 192, or 256 kilobytes of RAM memory $9£>0 per 64K increments. 

Six PACK PLUS $39.95 

Same as Combo Plus but expands to 384 KB of memory 

SONY BAHERY PACK NP-11 $39.95 

(9,6V, 1 000 MAi) for laptop computers and camcorders, nickel-cadmium 

battery 

ASYNC CLUSTER ADAPTER by AST RESEARCH INa $199.00 

Multichannel Board providing four individually addressable RS-232 
Serial Ports on IBM PC/XT/AT and compatibles {uses AST- 
FourPort/XNTM Enhanced Xenix™ Communications Version #2,0) 
(ASYNC CLUSTER ADAPTER Cable additional $15,00). 

1/4" STREAMING TAPE CONTROLLER by ADAPTEC, $33.95 
SCSI to QIC-36, Model ACB-3530A (Manual $5.00) 

FLOPPY DISK CONTROLLER BOARD $19.95 

Dual 360K or 720K switch selectable 

BEZEL $2.00 

For full height tiard drive, black with nedangular LED lower lefthand cor- 
ner, double-sided tape for mounting, 3-S8"x5-7/8" 

USER PLATFORM ARRAY $499.00 

10 MW HeNe Laser, power supply, 2 beam splitters, 5 front surface 
mirrors, AO modulator, AO driver, polygon scanner, photo detectors, 
3 special lenses, polarizer, over $5,000 worth of optical components 
plus documentation, Sdd many of these to Fortune 500 companies, 
universities, and research labs. Applications include research, design 
and engineering. An experimenter's dream. 

NEW! NEC 10 Mil HeNe LASER Plus Power Supply $200.00 

LASER POWER SUPPLY $39.95 

Semi-kit, Units removed from laser video disk players, comprised of 
power cable, transformer and circuit board. Will power 1 to 10 MW 
HeNe laser. Excellent bargain. 

SHARP USER DIODE $8.95 

LT1022MC, 5mW at 780nm, single transverse mode. 

MIRRORS, PRECISION FRONT SURFACE 
For use with lasers, 
13.7/8"x1-3/16" $7.00 19-1/2 "xl-5/8" $10.00 



GREEN FLUORESCENT TUBE for scanners 
STAGBSTUDIO QUARTZLINE LAMP 

FEL(QIOOOMCL) 1000W, 120V 3200» 

INTEL 27128A-20 EPROM (New) 

INTEL 2732^3 EPROM (New) 

INTEL P-8031 

TRIAC; Hitachi FSM16F4 400 volts 16 AMPS 



$2.00 

$9.95 
$4.00 
$2.00 
$3.00 
$2.50 
DIODES 6A 200V Motorola Part No. MR752 30 tor $10.00 

RF CONNECIOR APPLIED ENGINEERING PRODUCTS $2.50 

Model 2005-1551-003 

GOLD WIRE WRAP SOCKETS 

14 pin-10 pcs/$5 16 pin-10 pcs/$6 

SOLID STATE REUY, CRYDON D1240 $19.95 

input 3-32 VDC, output 120 VAC 40A 

BIPOUR LEDS 10 PCS/$6 

MOTOR, AIRPAX $9.95 

120VAC 60Hz 2-12:1 gear train, toothed pinion 

COMPUMOTOR:MOTOR- CRYSTAL 

DRIVE SYSTEMS OSCILUTORS $1.50 

Model M57-83 $ 773 8 MHz, 13333 MHz, 

.. ^ , .XC-, ^r,-, t Q/io 14364 MHz, 15 MHz, 25 MHz 

Model M57-102 $ 942 36.037. ^Hz, 49,7664 MHz 

Model M106-178 $1696 50 MHz, 51,04 MHz, 75,6 MHz 

VGA RT. ANGLE PC BOARD MOUNT CONNECTOR 

Hi Density DB 15 10 pcs/$10.00 



COMPUTER POWER CABLES BY BELDEN $2 

10 AMR 18/3, 6" 

TOSHIBA T3100 EXPANSION INTERFACE PA7313E $99.00 

EXPANSION BOX PA7310U $299.00 

Interfaces Tosliiba laptops to IBM BUS to use IBM add-on boards, 

LCD DISPUY (MODEL LM585) BY HITACHI $199 

640 X 200 Graphic and Aipttanumeric 

LCD DISPUY (MODEL EA-Y40025AT) BY EPSON $35 

40 characters X 2 lines 

POWER SUPPLY 9.95 

For computer related equipment, Input 120V AC, 60Hz, 30W; 
Output =5V 00, 1000MA. +/- 12V DC, 200MA 

CCD DOCUMENT SCANNER $39.95 

Uses a 4096-element line imaging chip. Can use for robotics, 
astronomy, machine vision, high resolution slow scan TV, etc. Sup- 
plied with documentation, 

STEPPER MOTOR $29.95 

By Oriental Motor, Model if PH566-A-Q5, high precision, 500 steps per 
revolution, O.TS^i per step, 

HITACHI LCD DOT MATRIX LM215B $29.00 

Graphic and Alphanumeric, 480 Dot(W) x 128 Dot{H) High quali^ device 
easily interfaced with microprocessor. Bit map graphics and text. Other ap- 
plic^ions possible. Driving voltages available at microprocessor port, 
CMOS/TTL compatible signal level, built-in RAM for display data storage, 
built-in CMOS LCD driver and controller, supports full ASOl and extended 
character set, character size 5x7 or 7x9, dimensions 10,6" L x 43" W x 
4/100" D 

HITACHI DIGITIZING TABLET HICOMSCAN HDG-111 

Input de^ce through which graphic data is input to a computer, 

11" X 10" Dimension $199.00 

4-Button CURSOR for Digitizing Tablet $29.95 

Manual $5.00 

EDGE CARD CONNECTORS 

22/44 Connector, ,156 spacing 10pcs/$7.50 

25/50 Connector, for Apple 10pcs/$10.00 

COAX CONNECTOR Part #CP-N1 $1.50 

MONITOR BOARD WITH POWER SUPPLY/HI VOLTAGE $7.95 

Video, brightness, focus, vertical, and horizontal with flyback 
transformer and high voltage parts. Model 99-0493-001 rev D 
Replacement CABLES for IBM-like keyboards $2.99 

APPLE MANUAL (LaserWriter and LaserWriter Plus) $5.00 

WATERTIGHT AURM BELL $19.95 

By Henschel Corp., Type taBID3, size 3", 24V DC 

5 LB. SOLDER $25.00 

Wire, Rosin Core, Tin/Lead 60/40, Flux 2.2%, Dia. ,036 (20Ga} 

HARD DRIVE CONTROLLERS: 
Western Digital ST-506 (10-200 Mb) 

XT-WD1002A-WX1 $29 AT-WD1003WAH $39 

HP NUMERIC DISPLAY 5082-7300 $4.95 

DATA LINK CONNECTOR $7.75 

(AMP Part #501 1 07-2) Fiber optic field mountabie connector used 
with 125 NM fiber clad OD. This connector mates with AT&T 40 MB/s 
and 1 MB/s data link products. AT&T F, Eq, Ref. No. 1005B, 

AMP OPTIMATE FIBER OPTIC CABLE ASSEMBLY $49 

with Biconic Connectors (AMP Part #501450-2) 5 meters long, 

SYMBOL LASERSCAN 2000 

VISIBLE LASER DIODE SCANNER $899 

Hand- held point-of-sale bar code scanner manufactured by Symbol 
Technologies, Inc. 

ORIGINAL IBM MODEL 1130700 

COMPUTER PC POWER SUPPLY $19.95 

63W 115VAC. 

ORIGINAL IBM MODEL 154001438 

COMPUTER PC-XT POWER SUPPLY $29.95 

130W 115V AC. 



RE-SHOPPER 



LASERS 

Laser Platform Array Kit Price $499 

Can be used for research, design, and engineering in the medicai, 
irdustriai, and educational sectors. An experimenter's dream in the 
fields of holography, interferometry, graphic arts, light shows, and 
projection. The Laser Deck Consists of: 

Q A /O milliwatt (maximum output) Helium-Neon laser tube 
(NEC Part #GLG 5261} which emits a red beam. The tube is 
hard seal and 15.5" long by 1.75" in diameter It is mounted 
by two transi/erse mounting fixtures. 

Q The laser power supply (NEC Part #GLS5281A) powers the 
laser tube and has an input voltage of 115 to 120 VAC. 
Output sustaining voltage is 2800 to 3300 VDC. 

□ This unit sits on an 18.5 lb precision cast aluminum plate. 

Q The acoustic-optic modulator (NEC Part #0D8813A) is a 140 
Mtiz broad band amplifier and will take TIL and video 
signals. The A-0 driver is on the deck also and requires 24 
volts to operate. 

Q The polygon motor unit (Mir: Japan Electronics) is a 
ten-sided first surface mirror mounted on an electric motor 
that spins at approx, 26,000 rpm. The driver for the polygon 
unit is on the deck and requires 24 volts to operate. 

Q In addition to the main items above, there are (5) special 
surface mirrors, (2) beam splitters and (3) special lenses 
all attached by optical mounts which guide the laser beam 
to various sensors and places to give the desired result, a 
reproduced copy of information. 

□ We have available an excellent 24 volt LAMBDA™ power 
suppfy at 49.95 that will power both the Acoustic-optic 
modulator and driver and polygon motor unit and driver. 

Laser Beam Modulator $398 mcUOIS tube of Z5 ss.oo 
(Acoustic-Optic Modulator and Driver) Tri-state switch, CMOS 



COMPUTffl 
POWER 
SUPPLY 

130W115VAC 

IBM-XT 
Model 1501438 

(■h5V, -^12V, -5V, 
12V) 
These are brand new 
supplies. They make an 
excellent viforkbench 
powersupplyforexperi- 
menting. They can also 
be used in XT comput- 
ers and other electronic 
equipment. 

Priced to move 



Argon-Ion Laser (Air Cooled) $2995 

These lasers emit visible blue and green lines. Power output is 
llOmiW, They are re- built with brand new tubes and power supplies. 
Manufactured by a major laser company, they are excellent for laser 
shews and holography. These lasers are guaranteed for one year. 

NIHTEHOO CAME CONNECTOR $9.95 

The black connector inside game unit that game cartridge fits into. 

Often needs replacing when cartridge makes intennittent contact 

Almost impossible to get 

POWER SUPPLY $9.95 

Btkor Corp. LBA 5-6, Input 115/230VAC, 47-440Hz, Output 5V DC 

at 6.0 AMPS. 

HALOGEN LAMP S2.8S 

Toshiba JH115V930WK1 A, 17" long, 120V. 

HP 1Q-ELEMENT BAR GRAPH ARRAY $Z.DO 

HDSP-4S20 (red) 

HITACHI DIGITIZER «99.00 

Comscan HOG- 11 1 , grid board/mother board, no plastic case, you build 

the case. Standard serial interfac* (15" X 15-1/2"), works on a PC, 

IC SOCKETS ■ $1.00 

40 pin, Robinson-Nugent, tufcie cf 10 

MICRO-CQHTROLLER- 30148 $1.50 

ROM is already pn)grammed-you find a use, we've got 40K of these! 

HITACHI DIGITIZER $199,00 

HDG-1515BN-C, grid board/mother board, no plastic case, you build 

the case. Standard serial interface. Runs all versions of autocad. 

Cannot be used with mouse emulation. 



Gott Bectronies canies thousands of parts, i.e., lasers, optics, electro- 

medianical, electro-optk:, power supplies, computer related materials 

and general electronic suppliies far too numerous to llsL In order to better 

serve you, watch for ou highly inrcvalive twlletin board catalog ordering 

system. 

Coming soort, . .contests with prizes and giveaways. 

Have excess inventories to sell? Call us or FAX us your lists. 
Need special parts? Let t£ Know. 




1 

2-9 .... 
10-25 



.$29.95 
.$25.00 
.$20.00 



CABL£ NAILS 

by the box 

WOW! 

Black or White 
Each box, 100 nails. 
#814W-AB13mmfordual 
RG-59 cable, f^anufactured 
byABERDEEW. Used to tack 
when running cable. They 
have a hardened nail and 
tough plastic construction. 



1 

2-9 ,.„ 
10-25 



$2.00 

.$1.50 
.$1.25 



The REAL THING 
HARDTOHVD 

The complete IBM D0S3.3 manual 
in Spanish. Excellent for the bilin- 
gual sctiQois and trade schools. We 
had a hard time finding these, so 
let's just blow then out to you. 



1-9 

10-49.., 
50-99... 
100-up, 



$17.95 

.$15.00 

.$12.95 

$11.95 



EL DOS de IBM es la base para 
miles de programas de apllcacion. 
Muchas factlidades sn el manejo 
de datos estan a su disposiclon. ¥ 
usted puede desarrollar nuevas 
aplicaciones en una amplia gama 
de lenguajes da programaclon so- 
portados. 



COMPUTHl 

SWITCHING 

POWER SUPPLY 

63W115VAC 

IBM-PC 
Model 1130700 

(+5V,+12V, -5V, 12V) 

Brand New Supplies. Good for 
the workbeich. Can be used 
for external drive. Full of good 
parts, 1 ZVDC fan, caps, tran- 
sistors, etc. We hawe over 
1 ,000 of these units. Priced to 
move. 



1 

2-9,..,, 
10-25. 



$19.95 

.$16.95 
$14.95 



POWER 
CABLE 

157" Long, 115V 20A 

l't/3 grounded 3-wire, Male 
plug one enti, other end 3 
wires. Black. Can be used on 
power tools, air conditioning, 
electrical appliances, and 
wherever.Thesearerealbeau- 
ties, difflcull to find. We have 
over 4,000. 

1-9 $5.00 

10-49 $4.50 

50-99 $4.00 

IK $3.00 



riRnPR^S • COD, Castiier's Check 
UnUCnO ■ ^^ ^Q^ey Order 

Technical Support (213) 316-0916 
FAX: (2131 31B-9189 



I 24-HOim DBDB Lit: 800-544-1244 | 

$15,00 minimum oreer CA residents aM 675% 

GOTT ELECTRONICS 

2227 DuFoiir Avenje, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 



CIRCLE 344 OK FREE INFORMATION CARD 



RE-SHOPPER 



Amazing Pocket Reference! 

480 pages of tables, formulas, & conversions and it fits In your siiirt poclcet! 
{Size 3.2" X 5.4" x 0.6") 7^ 0n€<XU^frO4^fte^€ft€m€(^<MU0teI 



>JA- 



mEW RELEASE! 



^'» €very engineer, geologist, man- 
ager, foreman contractor, purchas- 
ing agent. maintenancQi person and^ 

^craftsman nsedethis bo'^*' ' ; 

;» A must for everv studeni, 

'}> The handymqff «. tiwam I 

iOQ% MONBV SACK QUABAN7BB 
^FNOT COMPLBTBLV SArfSflBD ! 





* Plus shipping and handling and Colorado 
reside nts sales tax. See order form below. 




• Air 

Profiortlos of Air 
Dansity of Moist Air 
General Gas Laws 
AirToolCFMvsPSI 
Air Hose Friction 

• Automotive 

Antifreeze Table 
Spark plug Torques 
Battery Charging 
01! Viscosity vs Temp 
Tire Size vs Load Rate 
Tire Manufacturer Codes 

• Carpentry and 
Construction 

Lumtsef Sizes & Grades 
Hardwood Grades 
Wood Characteristics 
Plywood 6 Panel Grades 

Floor Joist Span Limits 
Insulation R Values 
Concreted Mortar 

• Chemistry 8e Physics 

Elertjent Tables 
Periodic Table 
pH of Acids & Bases 
Elementary Particles 
Radioisotopes 



• Computers and 
Printers 

Computer ASCII Codes 
IBM® PC Error Codes 
IBM® Interrupls-IQ Map 
IBM® Memory Map 
80286 Hard Disk Types 
Printer Control Codes 
Cable Wiring 
Modem Comrruinds 

• Electrical 

Eteclric Wire Size vs Ixiad 
Copper Wire Resistance 
£(ectric Motor Specs 
Wire Classes & Insulation 
Wire Color Codes 
NEMA Motor Frames 
Wire & St>eet Guages 
Elecirio HP WB Torque 
Resistor Color Coaes 
Resistor Standard Values 
Capacitor Color Codes 
Pilot L^mp Specs 
Fuse & Battery Specs 
RF Coil Winding Data 
Wire Size vs Turns/Inch 
Wire Size vs Voltage Drop 
Ampacity vs Temperature 
Decibel Tatiles 
Electric/Electronic Fotmutas 



• General Information 

us & state Holidays 
Signs of the Zodiac 
Flowers of the Months 
Anntversaiy Names 
Radio Alphabet 
Morse & TEN Radio Codes 
Paper Sizes (InU) 
Mifitary Rank & Grade 
State Information 
Climate Data of the US 
Time Zones of the US 
Time Zones of the Worid 
TeiephoneArea Codes 
World Airport Etevations 
Lost Credit Card Phone #'s 
Airiine 1-800 Phone #'s 
Temperature Conversion 
Sound Intensities 
Body Weight vs Height 
Wind Strength Scale 
Wind Chill Factors 
Firewood Comparisons 
Fr^uency Spectrum 
Sun & Planet Data 

• Geology 

Mineral Tables 
Crystal Systems 
Mohs Hardness Scale 
Earthquake Scales 
Geologic Time Scale 



• Glues, Solvents, 
Paints and Finishes 

• Hardware 

Bolt Torque Tables 
Wood Screw Specs 
Sfteet Metal Seres Specs 
Nail Sizes and Welahls 
Wire Rope Cat>le Clamps 

• Math 

Inch-Foot-MU-Drill Numt>er 
Math Formulas & Tabtes 
Rorr\an Numerals 
Numeric Prefixes 
Triangle Formulas 
Plana Geometry Formula 
Solid Geometry Fomiula 

• Mining & Milling 

Sieve Sizes & Met Tables 
Stock Pile Volume a Weight 
Dumping Angles 
Mining Equipment Specs 

• Money & Currency 

Cutrency Exchange Rates 
Interest & NPV Tables 

• Plumbing & Pipe 



• Rope, Cable, & Chain 

• Steel & Metals 

• Survey & Mapping 

Percent Grade to Degrees 
Mappirig Scales & Areas 
Stadia/Apparent EKp Tables 
Magnetic becllnation 

• Tools 

Tap-Ole-Drill Sizes 
DnII A Cut Lubricants 
Fire Extinguishers 
Sand Paper & Abrasives 
Saw Blades 

• Water 

Water Friction Losses 
Water Discharge Tables 
Weld Electrode « Sokier 
Water Pollution * Hardness 

• Weights of Materials 

• Welding 

• 3200 Conversion 
Factors 



And MUCH) iiflUCH morej this isn't even 1/2 of ti|^^ct|iiM JjJBiiM 



Please send me 



1 to 9 books = $9.95 each 
10 to 24 books = $9.00 each 
25 to 54 books = $8.50 each 

Nanne: 



copies of Pocket Ref 

\ Plus 
Shipping ^ 



) 



Total Shipping & Handling per Order 



1 book =$2.00 

2 books = $4.00 

3 books = $4,50 

4 books = $5.00 

5 books = $5.50 



6 books =$6.00 

7 books =$6.50 

8 books =$7.00 

9 books =$7.50 

10 books =$8.00 



11 books=$8.50 

12 books =$9.00 

13 books =$9.50 
>14book3=$10.00 



Address: 

City/State/Zip: 

Payment enclosed (mark one): Check 
Card #: 



Company: 



Phone:^ }. 



Money Order 
Exp.Date: 



Visa 



MasterCard 
Signature;. 



Colorado Residents 
add 4.7% sales tax 
onthebool< + ship- 
ping total. 



The Book Source, Dept 954, P.O.Box 620820, Littleton, CO 80162 
TOLL FREE ORDER LINE!!! • (800)873-7157 

CIRCLE 342 ON FREE INFORMATION C 

6 HE-SHOPPER 



CIRCLE 342 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




WE HAVE AVAILABLE OVER 125,000 SURPLUS PLUG-IN WALL ADAPTERS 
THESE ARE ALL BRAND NEW IN A WIDE RANGE OF VOLTAGES AND 
CURRENTS IN BOTH AC AND DC OUTPUTS. WE ALSO HAVE 22O/240VAC 
ADAPTERS AND DUAL OUTPUT VOLTAGE POWER SUPPLIES. PHONE OR FAX 
US FOR OUR LATEST ADAPTER CATALOG OR CALL FOR AVAILABILITY 
AND PRICE QUOTE ON YOUR NEEDS. WB ARE ALSO INTERESTED IN 
PURCHASING YOUR EXCESS ADAPTER INVENTORY. CONTACT US TODAY! 



d^-L^f'l mU A^ r' 



9VDC/500ma WALL ADAPTERS 




2.1nimID/5inmOD plug 



• \o 

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Ul o 
o o 



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Ul a 

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o o 
o o 



VG610 



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CSA APPROVED VERSION. 



SURPLUS TRADERS specializes in the distribution of surplus parts 
and equipment to the electronic, computer and hi-tech industry- We 
publish a wholesale surplus catalog which is available to the trade 
at no charge. Please maxe your request on your company letterhead 
or accompanied by your business card. If you indicate your areas of 
interest or specialization - we will key our computer to target 
special offers in your field of interest. Hobbyists and those not 
in the trade may obtain our catalog for a handling charge of $2. 



SURPLUS 
TRADERS 

P.O. Boa 27C 

Wiatvra Ua« 

Albars. V«raioiit 05440 

514-739-9328 

(Fax 514-345-8303) 



12 RE-SHOPPER 



SUPtR SOFTWARE ! 



WE WILL TRY TO BEAT ANV PRICE ON ANVTHINC FROM ANYWHERE '11 
A TRULY PROFESSIONAL STAFF WITH A COMMITMENT TO SERVICE •.'.< 

* /JfcR COUNTR * 



AWESOME 80286 
TURBO -1 0/1 6MHz 



51 2K inilillad - Full Silt Cai* 

200 Wilt Powir Supply 

AMnJ BIOS ■ 101 Kiybunl 

Up to « MB on Mcthartiaanj 

t VO Siotm - 90287 Sodial 

R«Ht tmi Turbo Button 

K*ylDCt( (nd 3 LEDS 

CloctUCiiandar - . 

1 VEAH W*HB*MTV 



Now 



HMHt. 



.^iSfffiSSSS? .. 






T 



80386 

20 MHz Power 

1 MB - Inslalled - Expands lo B 

MS m Boanl - Z«o Wait Stala - 

Nonoo Laridmarii - 28 7-51oIs - 

I ■ JZBn.S- 16Qit. 1 '8Bil 

Msni Toww Casft - 200 Wan 

Powef SuppV ' ^ - Dow Bays 

2-5-1«--1ffiH(»2-3l(r 

80387 SocKei - CkKk Galendif 

101 ■ Keyt>oa/d - 1 Year Wa^anf^ 



Fg«)f tBM Compatible. 



$995 



AddS400ror 
38&25 MHi 



IJPER SYSTEM 



8088-1 -1 OMghz TURBO COMPUTER SYSTEM 



1 -Drive IBM Compatible System with 256K Memory 



Sum* 



System Incbcte* £5«X Jf^TALLEDSOSai ProMSMf' VHa» Height. 360K,5 1/4 Ofwe 

INST ALL E D ■ Ou ai Speed —< 77 Mghi ai^ 1 OMghj—T URBO ' 6 itoU - 6087 Socket 

*lS0W3nPDwerSupp»y'D*l"teKeytoard'FulSiraCaMlof4-1/2m Drives 

' 1 Vedf PansantUborWa^rartyD^fiase Unit (E)rWflWArr3nti&s Vary) 



AcW*20UeDfM \9Q 

Ad04»hfi[>f** ?4fi 

Ad(]i4CbS0rH* 2» 

ATiTColvUCin)vAMAJ&K0 SAk. 



AT4T 1?* BkKl^ 1 llVtwM Mono 

TtLkAJnCma 
Uono Gnphct Card fwfpTHilar pQiT 
^nil Card w f van) C>r0 

Plfj^wCli/aarTM Car] 



^yy 



» WwiwyUpgiakBiSIW 



Avallabl* 



HARD DRIVE DEALS 



MINISCRIBE 8450 XT 
40MB Hard Drive Kits 

40MB - 1/2HT - 5 1/4" Frame 
3 1/2" Drive-45MS Access Speed 



8-Bit RLL Controller INCLUDED 



NiIN!SCRlBE-3085-85MB-MFM-3 l/4"-l/2HT $499 

MMSCRIDE 3675-62MD-RLU5 1/4". NEW $299 

MINISCRI QE-8450 ■ 40 MB ■ RLL-3 I /2"-NE W $23 9 

SEAGATE-ST-138R-32MB-RLL-31/2" S199 

NONl SCRIBE-a438 F-30MD- RLL-31/2"-NEW S179 

SEAGATE-ST-23a-30MB-RLL-J UA'-iam $179 

1 AKDON-TM-262-20MB-MFM-3 1/2" $149 
W ESTERN DIG (T AL-MFM-XT Conl. w^ Cables J 49 
RLL Controllera for XV ajid ATs Available CAIX! 



Limited Quantiiies 
1 Year Warranty 
{rom Mmiscribc 




s^ 



PRINTER POWER 



^¥.*o* IBM 5182 



COLOR PRINTER 



BRAND NEW • H«BVy Duty 
• WkJa Cirrds* (133 C«)umn) 
■200 CPS On«-1IOCTSConiBandiM 



Ltu $I,HS 




Pipf f flick Avifllbl* * SUAi f^HMiO P«p« ONLY |U.U 
EMy CIW4^ C«ttdg« RUoM ' JWfel^b 

30 0«y WUTMH Q UAWnTT FHtCIHO — CA1.H II 



TOSHIBA P-321SL 

Iamazinc;! package 



Brand New 



24-PIN-it6CI>S-72NLO-N»riow Caniag* 

Parallel and Serial Inler1ace-3ZK BuHer-Tracloi 

1 Year Parts and Labof 



Package Includes P '.-I'.i i-' 

12 UlrtCk Mull.sd.kt- H.Mmi II J h Oitl <- . 



ifiv'K Wsrra 



SAVE 72% 



Package 
Price 



Lst 



$399 



MINISCRIBE WarTanty-6 Monlhs-NEW DRIVES 

Sc^ealo & Tandon Wananly-90 Days-OEM Pulls 

QUANTITY PRICING AVAILABLE 

CALL FOR details; 



'•:t- tlLSI MHlMlfeH VAtUt IN ink 'J^A' 



MP1 — PRINTMATE — 350 



300 CPS ■ 60NLQ - Wide Carriage 



IB Wie Tctuioiiiey - IBM;Ej»on C«l«£ ' ViiiaUe vv<dlh 
Traaor UplaS-PartPormFitmlKfivPaatWhOiafSO 
FtjncSbfts - 90- Day vtamrif ■ Paiaiei imertaoo 
OmmHf Pticlnt itmliible *Ti!!? 

CALL! BRAND NEW ^W»"'^ 



BRAHP N,EW 



CITIZEN MSP • 50 

BRAND NEW! - Color Optional! 

300 CPS V "l" Njhm CanUfi »WVi . EcunWM CsmuliM 

I^Toow Booofflfvcd A<f1DrTutc Pjpw (J3a1^ 
t4Q IK Bu>f - IB kAwi Uwilkbwi Wlrnnlr 

i»».c— i-—.™—^ °"'' S 269 



<:ttoini(7CDi(ni 



SEIKOSHA SL'SOAl 

24Ptn-135CPS-54NLQ 

Below Dealer Cost 



BRAND HEW 



iPfcO" 



RITEMAN BY C-ITOH BRWWMEWf 

120CPS-6OCPS Fj(p»nd«l $-t>1Q 

Narrow Carnage-Pairalei Intartaoe «p I H^ 

BO Day Warranty - CXlanli^ Priting Availacie 



MONITOR MANIA 



S. Cilrd Dc-ijl 



PRINCETON GRAPHICS 

Ultra Sync t4 Color Monitor 

M-MsjUteync- Ultra Hi Res 31 Dot Pilch 

— eoOiSOO R«urtie/wd 

Ml m CofltHt Ion — Fu« 1 • Y«ar Warrareif From Prlocaon 

WoftHof Cardi Only |^^JlQ 



IBM — VGA COLOR 



1 3' Viflwmo Area 640i'WO - 31 Dot Pucti 

iaMMcicXll«7544(Sai BRAMONEW 
High P^rlQrmancfl Graphi:^ /^-^s/^^A 
90 Day Worrany ( . - - - \ 

LislSi.&OS ONLY 

UNBEUEVABLE VALUE 



<3m> 



AMDEK 600T — Color 

14- 'FIGe-Cotar-e0Oi200, QrMrVAirlMr Swilch, Tits Swnul 

BRAND NgW Usi M50 ONLY $209 



AMSTRAD COLOR VGA 



.28 

Dot Pilch 

Ullra-Hi-Res-1 2' VGA-PC-Model 12HR 
Tilt & Swivel -720)! 480- „ , 
Anli-Glare Screen Only 

1 YEAR WARRANTY -BRAND NEW 



NCR - IS" - GREEN - TTL wiih NCR 
Monitor Card - 640x400 LIST $438 ONLY 
BRAND NEW 90 Day Warraniy $149 



AT&T CRT-327 - 12" TTL-BI»ck It 
WhKe Monitor & ATAT 1024HP Card 

Hi-Resoltttion-«OCh4gO-rill & Swivel 
Works On All IBM ATiXTf A Compaiibiti 
W Day Wamuily 

QvuVitT (Wr»r ON LY 

6-11 H,lMH».Z4-$ [Qi, Pro I4-CiiB 



LiitJI390 

$119 



AT&T 



318H with AT&T 
Color Card 



Wi.tkM.n All lUM Al XI s \ ( ..m[«lihltv 



12" - Super Hi-Res — CGA — Color Monitor 

600x400 — .31 Dot Pitch — Anii-Glare Screen 

Tilt & Swivel - 90 Day Warranty 

CSrr!^ wiihlhe'AT&T VDC4d0Cotor"a[3~ 



Botroi Tn^n E^CiA Robotulon^ 



TnoSeiTQGARasoiiJl'On VouCaf' Buy 



Quantity Pricina: 3-J269, 6-^59. 
12t2J9.Z4$£390J«24-Call ONLY 



Brand New Condition 
Factory Rcbuibished 
List $849 




* * Electrified Discounters * 

(800) 678-8585 



HC 



•iu<s9AM 



7PM 



ORDERS 
ONLY 



\Oti 5tmtman Avmu« 

Itomdm. or 0(514 

Fit MM4I4U0 

nv •MinERi; «H0 B1t>4 drCEPIEOI 



Clislomef Servies i Tvclinicil Support 

(203)287-1976 



30-DAY MONEY 
BACK GUARANTEE! 

FJI lhlur«) B< Kanow*"! 
Pr>cr an all htSjriuvni Frodwcti 



OtSei 



ikfjincv 



If f ' ^ »- >; 



r-w" rvt-T»-*if •« / 



RE-SHOPPER 1 



If you mail to the computer marketplace . ... 

MAILING LISTS TO TARGET YOUR KEY PROSPECTS 



1) HEATHKIT 



2) NUTS & VOLTS 



3) KENSINGTON 
MICROWARE 



Over 97,000 electronic hobbyists who purchase ham radios, 
home computers, educational courses. 

83,000 Subscribers/buyers of parts and accessories for ham 
radios, computer hardware and software, CB gear, cable TV. 

An active file of 273,000 buyers and inquirers of micro 
computer peripherals. Select IBM- PC, Macintosh, Apple 
users. 



4) JDR 

MICRODEVICES 



NEW! A large list of micro computer users. 



For details, call or FAX: 



J.F. Glaser Inc. 

999 Main Street/ Suite 103 
Glen Ellyn, IL 60137 

708-469-2075 
FAX: 708-790-5244 



CMOS TLCS55 to.65 

THIERS U C556 $0.89 



AU0IOAMP5: TDAaW^ifiW) it.ii 

0*0-220 CASE) TDA2030 (14W) $1.49 



AUDfO POWER DRIVER ICs: NE640H $1.40 LM3eiN-S0....$t.29 



ALPHA-NUMERIC LED ARRAY 

7x5LE0Matrtx. For Moving 
Message Signs, Etc. By lEE. 
#2057-o/crow8. YourChotee: 

# 2058 - o/a rows. *OM aa 

WlthHook-Up (StZE:2X1.Sin) ** "**' 
8 Fof $T7.95) R ARE SURPLUS FIND! NEWl 




RS232 DRIVERS 

1488 $0.49 

1489 $0,49 

HAX232 $2.40 



J FETS FOR 
HAMSl 

MPF102or2N5486 
$0.40 Your Choice 



CRYSTALS $1,25 



1.043 
2.0OO 
2.457 
3.120 
3.579 
3.680 



4.000 
4.915 

5.068 
8.000 
10.000 
11.059 



14.318 
20.000 

ALL 

IK 

MHZ 



liOS POWER FETS. ALL NEW! 

1HF521 (TO-220)N-CH $0.S9 

IRF531 (TO-220) N-CH $0.88 

IRF 8531 (TO-220) P-CH $0.98 

IRF243 (TO-3) N-CH $1.19 

IRF 253 (TO-3) N-CH $1,49 

VN67AB (TO -5) N-CH $0.79 

VN10K (TO -92) N-CH $0.49 

IRFD110 (DIP) N-CH $0.69 



CAPS FOR HAMS I 

High VoHage I Very Dangerous. 

110 MFD 450V AXIAL $1.99 

800 MFD 450V CAN $3.95 

6100 MFD 350V CAN $6.85 

ALL NEW. NAME BRANDS I 
HARD TO FIND. 



CAPS FOR POWER SUPPLES 

8200 MFD 50V....RADIAL,.. $0.99 

12,000 MFD 75V,...CAN $2.95 

21 ,500 MFD 40V.,..CAN $2.95 

41 ,000 MFD 35V.,..CAN $3.95 

47,000 MFD 25V....CAN $2.95 

105,000 MFD 25V....CAN $2.95 



STEPPER MOTOR $3.95 

IBM Surplus. 8 wire. 

4 windings. 7V @ 350 mA 

1.8' (200 steps per rev.) 

DC. les. 20 ohm ea. 25 oz. in, 

torque. Works great on 5vclc. W/Data 

FOR ROBOTICS 



nUAC: BT13»>S001ZAW)1 
SOO PRV. TO-220 $0.99 



ay»S 8032 UtCROPROCESSOfl 
80C32 By Matra. 40 pin DIP 1 2 MHZ. Very low power. $3,^ 



PLASTIC TRANSISTORS: 6 FOR 91 

2N3904 PN2222 2N4124 2N3415 



2N3906 
2N4401 
2N4403 
2N4125 



BY PASS CAPS 

,1 MFD 50V RADIAL 

(.to in. spacing) 10/$1 

(.30 in. spacing) DIP BJ%t 



CMOS EPROMS 

27C32HQ (house #).$1 .49 

27C84-2 (Intel) $2.9S( 7912 $0.49 

27C256(TI) $3.50 

27C512{Tl) $5.50 



PN2907 
2N356S 
2N60e6 
2N5551 



2N5401 
2N5172 
2N6517 
MPSAQ6 



2N3417 
2N50e9 
2N33g2 
MPSA56 



STATIC RAMS 

6116LP-15 $1.95 

6264P-15,.. $2,95 

62256LP-10 $8.95 

2114 $0.39 

7193-S45P $1.08 



7805.. 
7812.. 
7815, 
7824, 
7906. 



..$0,49 
..$0.49 
,,$0.43 
,.$0,49 
,.$0.49 



7915.. 
7924.. 



$0,49 
$0.49 



VOLT. REO. IC« 

LM317T $0.69 

LM337T $0.69 

78H12 $4.95 

7eH05 $3.95 

723 $0.49 

tU84 $1.18 

TL4^ $1.18 

TL497 $1 .48 



TO-3 POWER TRANSISTORS MJ2855....$0.98 

2N4398....$1,49 2N3773„,.$1 .49 2N6547...,$2.49 

2N3055....$0.e9 2N6056.,.,$1 ,49 2N6254....$1 .49 

2N3771....$1.95 2N6038„..$1.95 2N 5881 ....$0.99 

2N3772...,$1.95 2N6308....$2.49 2N 6879.... $0,99 



^.! I IONICS 



11301 W.Saltllne Rd. #1 05 



SG3624 $1,26 

SG3526 $1.25 

LAS6350.,.$1.49 

LM309K $0,99 

LM350K $3.95 



FULL WAVE 
BRIDGES 

1.5A 400V $0,49 

2A 200V $0.49 

IDA 400V $0.99 

35A600V $2.95 



XEROX 
LENS 

4-etement, 

coated. F;5.7 lOhi. F.L. $9.95 

fixed aperture of 1 .75 in. MPW 



TRUC DRIVERS 

MOC3010 MOC3040 
MCIC3011 MOG3041|Q,gQ 



LINEARS 

OP07 (DIP) $1.49 

T1062 (house*) $0.48 

TL072 (DIP) $0.69 

LM324(0IP) $0,49 

LM358 (DIP) $0.49 

LM348 (DIP) $0,69 

MC4741 (DIP) $0,69 

LM318 (DIP) $0.99 

LF356 (can) $0.89 

5532 (DIP) $0.99 

5534 (DIP) $0.99 

MC3403 (DIP) $0.49 

TL084 (DIP) $0.99 

HC4558 (DIP) $0.49 

4136 (DIP) $0.69 

LM339(DIP).. $0.49 

75491 (DIP) $0.69 

75492 (DIP) $0.69 

ULN2003 (DIP) $0.69 

LM3900(DIP) $0.59 

LM2900(DIP) $0.79 

XR2240(DIP) $0.99 

— B^FSTsTSTRP— 



3N: 



1204 



Your Chotoe: 
MPF131 $0.59 



214-242-8702 FAX: 214-709-5041 TERMS: Send check, or use, Visa, MC. NO COD. USA.Canada Only. Add $3.85 
Camrfton, Tk 75006 (Stofe prices vary) (or UPS, Texas add 8% sales tax. 90 Day limited warranty on all Hems. $15 min. 



10 RE-SHDPPER 



QUALITY PARTS • DISCOUNT PRICES • FAST SHIPPING 




LED'S 

Special purchase on two types of 
rectangular LEDs. Both styles have a face 
which is 5 mm X 2.1 mm. 

Red LED 10 mm long 
and 4 mm wide at the base. 
CAT#RLED-5 10 for $1.00 
200 for $15.00 • 1 000 for $50.00 



g 



Green LED 8 mm long ar>d 

2.1 mm wide throughout. _^ 

CAT#RLED-6 10 for $1.00 

200 for $15.00 • 1000 for $50.00 

T 3/4 (3 mm dia.) RED LEDS 



Axial leads 

CAT#LED-9 10 for $1.00- 

200 for $15.00 > 1000 for $50.00 

Cut and bent radial leads 
CAT#LED-10 10 for $1.00 
200 for $1 5.00 • 1 000 for $50.00 



^ 



OPTO-ISOLATORS 



=C: 



Clairex* ClM-6000 
LED-photoconductor 
isolator. Off resistance: 500 ohms. On re- 
sistance: 500K ohms. 2000 volt isolation. 
Fonward voltage: 2 Vdc. CAT* CLM-6000 
$2.50 each • 10 for $22,00 



Sigma#301T1-12B1. 
Signal apiplied to the input is coupled by 
meansof light to isolated photo conductive 
cell. High reliability switching. 12 Vdc. 
CAT#OP-301 $1.50 each 

REFLECTIVE OPTO SENSOR 

IR emitter and sensor pair pointing in the 
same direction. Light from emmiter bounc- 
es off object to be detected by sensor. 
TRW/Optron# OPB5447-2 
Rectangular package with 
28" color coded leads, 
CAT#0SR-4 2 for $1.00 



CALL OR WRITE FOR OUR 
FREE 60 PAGE CATALOG 

WITH OVER 4000 PARTS! 

OUTSIDE THE U.S.A. PLEASE SEMD 

S2.00 POSTAGE FOR A CATALOG 





ONE MINUTE TIMER 

Originally used as a 
game timer this whits 
box with a blue button 
will drive you crazy. 
Box measures 
3 1/4" square X 2" high. 
When the button is pressed 4 LEDs light 
and a beeper pulses. Every 15 seconds 
one led goes out and the speed of the 
beeping increases. At the end of 60 sec- 
onds the unit gives off a long beep fol- 
lowed by a low squelch, all LEDs shut off 
and the unit stops. If at any time during 
the cycle you want the unit to stop, press 
the blue button and the beeping stops and 
in ten seconds the unit shuts off. Unit re- 
quires a 9 volt transistor battery (not in- 
cluded) to operate. 

CAT# TMR^I $2.25 each • 1 for $20.00 
9 volt Alkaline battery 
CAT#BAT-9 $1.70 each 



RELAYS 

6 VOLT D.C. - D.P.D.T. 

Sigma# 70 HE22-6DC. 
2 amp contacts. 
52 ohm coil. 
Polycarbonate cover. 
1 1/B" high X 9/10" X 3/4" 

CAT* RLy-62PC $2.50 each 








24 Vdc- D.P.D.T. -PC MOUNT 

Fujitsu* FRL-264 D024/02GK y^^>^ 
1 amp contacts. ~ '''' 

685 ohm coil 
1. 354" X. 858" XI, 110". 
Clear plastic case, "V' 

CAT#RLy-229 $2.50 each 

24 Vdc - D.P.D.T. - PC MOUNT 

Omron# MX2P-OE-UZ-006004 

492 ohm coil. 

Contacts rated 

3 amps @ 120 Vac 

or 5 amps at 30 Vdc, 

Clear polycarbonate dustcover 1 .03" X 

0.875" X 0.69". UL and CSA listed. 

CAT* RLY-230 $1 .75 each 



TOLL FREE 

PHONE ORDERS 

1-800-826-5432 




ABS INSTRUMENT 
ENCLOSURES 

Molded ABS 
Instrument 
enclosures 
are available 
in ivory, i)eige, 
grey, blue, 

and black. Front and rear panels in match- 
ing .090" thick ABS plastic or, as an op- 
tbn, anodized satin finish aluminum. Inte- 
gral P.C, board mounting standoffs and 
two sets of vertical mounting slots for front 
and rear subpanel P.C. boards. Includes 
6-32 pan head screws and anti-skid rubber 
feet. All enclosures are 6" wide X 6.25" 
deep. Front and rear panels available in 
2.25", 2.625-, and 3" heights. 

ivory 2 1/4" MB lA $7,50 6,50 6,00 

beige " MB-2A 

grey MB-3A 

blue • MB-4A 

black MB-SA 

ivory 2 5/8"MB-1B $7.75 6.75 6.25 

beige MB-2B 

blue " MB-4B 

black MB-5B 

ivory 3" MB-1C $8.00 7.00 6.50 

beige MB-2C 

grey " MB-3C 

blue MB-4C 

black ■ MB-5C 

Satin finish aluminum front or rear panels, 

1-* 104* 100+ 

$1.00 .85 ,70 
$1.20 1.10 1.00 
$1.40 1.25 1.10 



2 1/4" PNL-1 

2 S/8" PNL-2 

3" PKL-3 



NEON INDICATOR 120 VOLT 



Good looking neon indicator 

RATED: 120 voHs @ 1/3 watt. Mounts 

in 5/16" hole. Red lens with chrome ring. 

CAT#1ND-100 75c each 

10 for $7,00 '100 for $65.00 



MAIL ORDERS TO: 
ALL ELECTRONICS 

P.O. BOX 567 
VAN NUYS.CA 91408 



CIRCLE 341 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



RE-SHOPPER 



QUALITY PARTS • DISCOUNT PRICES • FAST SHIPPING 





MINIATURE GEAR MOTORS 

Buehler series 61.13 

Miniature DC gearhead 

motors. Reversible. 

Motor and gearhead 

enclosed in rugged 

die-cast housing. 1 .55" X 1 .122" X 1.475". 

Long-life bronze bearings. 0.1 15" diameter 

flatted shaft. Two types available: 

18 volts dc (nominal) @ 50 ma. 

10 rpm @ 14 Vde (no load) 

17 rpm @ 24 Vdc (no load) 

CAT#M0TG-18 $5.50 each 

38 volts dc (nominal) @ 70 ma. 

274 rpm @ 24 Vdc (no load) 

451 rpm @ 38 Vdc (no load) 

CAT# MOTG-38 $5,50 each 

12 VDC GEARHEAD MOTOR 

Soho# GBL 35-DH-21 080-1 OY 
Powerful little 
gearhead motor. 
40 RPM @ 
12 Vdc. 0.5 amps 
(no load). 32 RPM with load. 
Operates at lower voltages with reduced 
speed and torque. 6.3 pound inches 
torque. Stall: 27 pound inches. 3.1" long X 
1 .375" diameter. Shaft: 0.1 S7" dia. X 0.75" 
long. CAT#M0TG-14 $11.50each 
10 for $100.00 



-fj^ 




STEPPING MOTORS 

Airp3x#C82711-M1 
17 Vdc 23.25 ohm 
dual coil, permanent 
magnet stepper motor. 7.5 degrees per 
step, 2.25" dia. X .91" thick. 0.25" dia. 
shaft is 0,6" long. Two hole mounting 
flange, 2.625" centers. 6 wire leads. 
CAT# SMT-6 $6,00 each • 1 for $50,00 

Airpax* 82710 

12 Vdc, 36 ohm dual coil permanent mag- 
net stepper motor. 7.5 degrees per step, 
2.25" dia. body X 0.93" high. Mounts on 
2.675" centers. 6 wire leads. 
CAT# SMT-7 $7.00 each.* 1 for $65.00 




POWER SUPPLIES 

5 VOLT, 5 AMP 

Lambda# LUS-9A-5 
Switching power supply. 
Input: 85-132 Vac 47-440Hz 
or 110-165 Vdc 37 watts 
Output: 5 Vdc ± 5% @ 5 amps. 
Overvoltage and overcurrent protection. 
120 mV ripple. 5.2" X 3.8" X 1 ,375-. Grey, 
vented metal case. UL and CSA listed. 
CAT#PS-5S $14.00 each 

12 VDC 2.1 AMP 

Lambdas LUS-9A-1 2 
Fully enclosed switching 
power supply with screw 
terminal conn act tons. 
Input: 120 Vac 60 Hz, 
Output: 1 2 Vdc ± 5% @2.1 A overvoltage 
and overcurrent protection. Compact venti- 
lated case measures 5.24" X 3.81" X 1.38" 
overall. Includes instruction sheet. 
CAT#PS-122 $23.50 each 

24 VOLT DC -2,4 AMP [s^ ^ _.-^ 

Power-One lnc.# HC24-2.4 

Input: 11 5/230 Vac 

(wired for llSVac) 

Output: 24 Vdc @ 2.4 amp. Brand new 

open frame power supply with line and 

load regulatton, remote sensing, overload 

and short circuit protection. 5.62" X 4.87" 

X 2.50". CSA rated. 

CAT# PS-2424 $30. 00 each 





6 or 10 mhz HU-18/U STYLE 
CRYSTALS - SPECIAL PRICE 



P 



6mhzCAT#CRY-618S 
10mhzCAT#CRY-1018S 
MINIMUM ORDMR 
100 PIECES 

100 of either VALUE $75.00 
500 of either VALUE $300.00 
1000 of either VALUE $500.00 



CHOKE GRAB BAG 

8 pieces, 2 each of 

4 different tunable 

chokes. Actual values unknown. 

CAT# GRCK $1 .00 each 




ELECTROLUMINESCENT 

STR1P(GL0W STRIP) 

AND INVERTER 





Electroluminescent Strips used for back- 
lighting control panels or as decorative or 
emergency prime lighting source. They are 
thin, tough and flexible and operate on kiw 
current. They operate on AC voltage, and 
the preferred power source is a miniature 
DC to AC inverter. We received a supply 
of glow strips that have a bit of an odd 
shape. The strips are 2.15" wide X 5.88" 
long and are 0.035" thick. The luminescent 
area is 5.3" long X 1 .72" wide and has 
one corner cut off, leaving a useful area 
of fairly good proportions. We are selling 
the strips and inverters as a package. 
Inverter operates on 6 Vdc. 
Glow strip, inverter and hook-up diagram 
CAT#GS-500 $5.00 per set 

EXTRA INVERTERS 

Input: 6 Vdc Output: 225 Vac 
CAT# INV-1 $2.00 each 



DIGITAL CLOCK AND 
APPLIANCE TIMER 

Turn on lights, radio, 
VCR automatically. 
Digital clock and 
appliance timer 
removed from 
automatic electrto 
coffee makers due 
to design changes. 
Operates on 1 20 Vac and is cape^le of 
turning on appliances drawing up to 10 
amps. Because of the application they 
ware designed for they automaticalty turn 
off after two hours. Guaranteed to work 
but some have surface blemishes. 4.2" X 
2.45" X 1.1 "deep. Beige or ivory with 
brown trim. CAT# MCT $6.50 each 




TOLL FREE ORDER LINES 1-800-826-5432 

FAX (818) 781-2653 • INFORMATION (818) 904-0524 

Minimum Order $iO.0O- All Orders Can Be Charged To Visa. Mastercard Or Discovercard • Quantities Limited • 

California, Add Sales Tax • Shipping And Handling $3.50 For the 48 Continental United States - All Others Including 

Alaska, Hawaii. P.R. And Canada Must Pay Full Shipping • No C.O.D. • Prices Subject to change without notice. 



8 RE-SHOPPER 




13406 Saticoy Street 

North Hollywood, CA 91605-3475 



CORP. 




(Call for free catalog J 



m. 




A,C. POWER SUPPLY 
STACO MODEL EIOIOVA 

This unit has been designed and con- 
structed for rigorous industrial, classroom 
or laboratory applications. These power 
supplies are brand new. Current frst price 
$7SO.OO. Specifications: Input: 120 VAC 
50/60 HZ. Output: O-120 VAC 10 amps. In- 
cludes manual with schematics. Features! 
Ammeter^ voltmeter, convenience outlets 
power indicator and circuit breaker Dimen- 
sion: 10" xlS" x 6\ WeiRhU 22 lbs. 

Price: $1&5 




TEKTRONIX MODEL 453 
OSCILLOSCOPE 

Vertical, 2 Channels. Bandwidth and 
risetime: 10 mV/d(v to 20 mV/div; DC to 50 
MHz, 7 ns. 10 mV/div; DC to 45 MHz, 7.8 ris. 
SmV/div: DC to 40MHz, 8.75 ns. Calibrated 
Deflection: 5 mVlolO V/divinll calibrated 
steps (1-2-5 sequence). Input RC: 1 megohm 
* 2%, 20 pf * 3%. Modes: Channel 1, 
Channel 2 (.normal orinverled), added alter- 
nate and chopped. Has vertical delay line. 
Honzonlah Time Base A: O.TusMivloS5/dtv 
in 24 steps. Length continuously variable 
from 4dfvto11.0 = 0.5 div. TTme Base B: 0.1 
us/div to O.S sec/div in 21 calibrated steps 
(1-2-5 sequence). X 10 Magnifier: Increases 
sweep rate to 10 n se<Jdtv. Triggers after 
detay time or starts ^fter delay. Time Base A 
^•"'gg^' Modes: DC internal/external: AC, 
ACLF reject, AC HF reject- X-Y operation Ch 
1 horizontal^ Ch 2 vertical, 5 mV/div to 10 V/ 
dfv in 11 calibrated steps- B.W. is DC to ^ 5 
MHz f-;JdB), Horizontal AmpHfier (exi in) 
270 mV/div or 2.75 V/div in external -^ 10 
position. Calibrated sweep delays 0.2 us to 
50 sec. General: Power Requirements: 90 to 
272 V iS 45 to 440 hz. Size: VV*" [H}^MW 
fW) Ximi^iO) > Wt. 27*4 lbs. Includes man- 
ual. Price: 5400.00 



(818) 787-3334 




HP 333A DISTORTION ANALYZER 

Covers 5 Hs: to bOO kHz range, Measurej 
down to 0.1% fullscale distortion, ^nciude^ 
auto nulling feature to speed up time con- 
suming portion of measurements. Also in- 
cludes swttchable high-pass filter to attenu- 
ate frequencies below components. 

Price: $69.'; .0(1 




HEWLITT PACKARD 

MODEL 606A SIGNAL GENERATOR 

Signal Generator: Freq. 50kHz to 65 mHz in 
6 bands = 1%. freq. call 100kHz and 1 mHz, 
RF output 0.1 uV to 3,0V at 50 ohms ± IdB 
over freq. range, output VWXR — 3D OBC 
leverage 0-10V, modulation to 100% 
+ 0.SDB over freq. range- Internal: 400 
Hzn000Hz±5%. External: DC to KHz. 
Power iiM»V, 50 to 10O0 Hz, 135 watts. Size: 
20 W" (W) X -nW (H) X 14^'^" fU Wt. 46 lbs. 
Price: $250.00 




L.R. 

TANK 

PERISCOPE 

Type M-24. Rugged 
military construc- 
tion. Contains two 
independent In- 
frared image con- 
verter tubes plus 
correction lenses, 
prisms, and eyepieces- The binocular view- 
ing system is directly connected to a prism- 
type periscope. The image tubes have dy- 
namic focus provided by a built-in adjusta- 
ble voltage divider. This unit requires 10 to 
15 KV at Jcjw current for operation. Unable 
to supply power supply. (Dimensions: 18" 
high >t 9" wide x 4W thick. Weight 17 Ibs.l 
Stock #OP 9001 Price: $200.00 



(800) 235-6222 

OUTSfDE CALIF. 




HP 651A TEST OSCILLATOR 

Frequency range is 10 t-lz to 10 MHz in sk 
bands. Dial calibration,! to 10. Dial accuracy 
is ±2%, too Hz tol MHz, ±3%, ID Hz to TO 
MHz, Output of 2D0 mW (3,16 V input 50 n); 
16 mW (3,16 V'-P"! 600 tl); 6.52 V open cir- 
cuit. Output monitor voltmeter monitors 
level at input of attenuator In volts or dB; 
accuracy is ±2% at full scale; frequency 
response is flat within in 2%, 100 Hz to T 
MHz; ±3%,10Hlto100Hz; 5:4%,4MHzto 
10 MHz. Attenuation range is 90 dB in 10 dB 
steps; overall accuracy is sO.1 dB. 

Price: $295.00 




HEWLETT PACKARD 8640B-OPT 323 
SOLID STATE SIGNAL GENERATOR 

(w/o synchronizer) Frequency range: 450 
KHi to 512 MHz, to 1100 Mhl with external 
frequency doubler option (not supplied). 
Ten Frequency bands in octave increments 
from 500 KHz; band 11 for doubler use. Ac- 
curacy: b digit LED read out. Stability: ■= 
1000 ppm. Output power; -145dBmto +10 
dBm (0.013 V to 2 V) into 50 tl. Level flatness 
is < -I 0.5 dB from 0.5 to 512 MHz. Imped- 
ance is 50 il. VSWR < 2.0 on 2 V and 1 V 
range < 1.3 on other ranges >. Spectral 
Purity: Harmonics at 1 V outpt > 35 dS be- 
low fundamental of 0.5 to 12B Mhz; > 30 dB 
below fundamental of 128 to 512 MHz. Mod- 
ulation: Internal AM, FM and PM, external 
AM, FM, and PM. Pulse frequency; 0.05 to 5 
KHz. General: Power Requirements; 100, 
120, 220, 240 V, 48 hz to 420 hz, 2 amps. 
Note: OPT 323 built to military specifica- 
tions. Ruggedized performance for better 
operation under severe environment. Size: 
6" (H) X 19' (W) X 13V4" (D), Wt, 60 lbs. 
Includes ruggedized case and manual. 
Price: SISSO.OO 

Current Hewlett Packard Price $12,050.00 



FAX (818) 787-4732 



RE-SHOPPER 7 




PRJCES 

Our competitive 
prices have placed 
us at the top. We 
have low, low 
prices because we 
mark down each 
item the lowest % 
we can afford. 



SERVICE 

For decades, our 
23,000 customers 
have been satisfied 
because we are 
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ing sure we do all 
we can to help cus- 
tomers save and 
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QUALITY 

We sell high qual- 
ity merchandise. 
If it wasn't good, 
we wouldn't buy it 
ourselves. Your 
satisfaction is 
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SHIPPING 

We ship anywhere 
in the world within 
24 hours from the 
date of your con- 
firmation. We can 
use: 

*Airmail 
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*other means 
of transport 



©/^Q=Q= ^©^ /k ^^ 



©/kl/kL© 



1 -800-325-2264 



DALBANl CORPORATION * 2733 CARRIER AVE " LOS ANGELES " CALIFORNIA * USA * TEL:213-727-00S4 ' FAX:21 3-727-6032 OR 213-888-6032 



RE-SHOPPER 



Computers, Components, Tools And Supplies 



Computer Products 



4025 Edwards Road 
Cincinnati, OH 45209 



1 (800) 423-4499 



Weller WTCPR Professional 
Soldering Station $99.99 




Cyrix Fasmath coprocessor 
Fully compatible with Intel 

but much faster 

80387-16 $299.99 

80387-20 .....$349.99 

80387-25 $429.99 

80387-33 $529.99 



Facit B3350 Wide Carriage Printer 
18 pin, includes cable $329.99 




MiniScribe M8450 Hard Drive Kit 
42.6 megabytes - 46 ms access 
with 16 bit card, cables... .$249.99 




db is one of the midwest's 
largest suppliers of electronic 
and computer parts!!! ICs, 
resistors, capacitors. Call or 
write for our free catalog. 




db Kit Systems - All the top 
quality parts necessary to 
assemble your own custom 
PC, AT, 386 or 486 system. 




386-33 cache main board 
OK memory $1,399.99 



14 RE-SHOPPER 



Microsoft Bus Mouse 
The real thing ...$39.99 



EasyPrint shares printers 
for 2 PCs....... .$79.99 



SQZ Plus from Symantec 
The best spreadsheet file 
utility for Lotus $49.99 




EasyLan PC to PC Network Special 
Full resource sharing network 
with hardware, software, cables 




The whole works $179.99 



Reference File, The first really 
serious pop-up database 
management system $49.99 




Twin Advanced, Spreadsheet - 
Graphics - Data Management - 
This is the one that you've heard 
so much about..Ai3)^^ $49.99 



-m^it^ 



%'• 



^Lk ^^#%b<v« vxi it^^i^ D^#^#Ji i^^te^ prices and availablity subject to change without notice 
Xjlj \,#Ulf1|jUlt7r I ri/UUUl^ cash mail order pnces- shipping anJ handling extra 

4025 Edwards Road, Cincinnati, OH 45209 (800) 423-4499 



RE-SHOPPER 



L TJ J J J J J ■j-j-j-j-j-j-s-j-j-j-j-j-j-TJ-J-J-J-J-J-J-J-J-J-J-J-J-J-J-J-jrj-j-j-j-j-j-j-JTJ-j-j-j-jrj-j-j-jj 
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NOW YOU CAN AFFORD A LOGIC ANALYZER 




BECKTRON's A-96 



The A-96 will convert any oscilloscope into an 
eight channel logic analyzer with; 

* 2K MEMORY PER CHANNEL 

* PRE-TRIGGER AND POST TRIGGER DATA CAPTURE 

* INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL CLOCKING 

* STORING UP TO SIXTEEN THOUSAND LOGIC EVENTS 
The A— 96 is so technologically advanced that 
its simple to use and at $389.00 its affordable 
For full information call BECKTRON at 
1-800-592-4L41 and request the 'A-96 INFO PACKAGE 
Master card. Visa and C.O.D orders excepted 



HHHHHHHHHHr'Hr^HHHHHr^Hr'HHHHHHr'r'HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHrTT'? 




MINALS 



n 



RCA 



$85 



RCA'i APTii a high quality, self- contained compu^B^, a smart terminal, laad<d' with 
inony features. Originally selling for about $500, this terminal ii a luper value for 
anyone needing a computer to access bulletin boards^ word pfoceit or simply free 
up o larger PC. 

* BuilbTn dual jpeec} tetephom modem ¥/ithi IU-1 1 port for msy hookup, 

* Can\poii\K video or Rf [cbannds 2&.4] allow us« of eiHver a monodirome or TV typ9 mo nitor. 

* Parallel pnnter port for connecrion of a Cfmhnonic} type printef^ 

• Serial (DB'25) RS-^SS port oBowj comiKriofl of JHC, Kord drive, modem or olfwr peripj w rd^ 

• Keyboard sebctobks 40 or 80 colum drspby. 

• Built in word processor vntfi word wrop feoture. 

* All terminol parameters ore fully od[usNib{e oltowing efnulation of many terminal systems, 

• Ajso indudes ocousHcol coiipler input, auto log-on^ 6 customizable function keys plus morel 
Our APf's ore yery cleon units rernoved from servico. Instruction monjalj wall cube power suppty 
and TV/ APT selector switch included. Optional A' Centronics pfintor cable— $25. Add S5 for UPS. 

IRON POWDER TOROID CORES 



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urw or* n*d 11 iitil ra^ fn^Hiqr pnfKli bfovH of tlHJr riliriH smI iht. EIU/RFI flltfn ■» IH^ V 
ta tkt i4riirlin4H«'> fnfiHcy rHgt. TW nffix af Hdi ceri (if. -2 ir -i] h§Mn tlit hIx. 



- MflRimum O rcmg*; .25'lOMHi 
ilx — Moxi tnumQranga 3. 30 MHz. 
ilx - Moxirttum Q laft^: 20^ 20D MMz. 
MoJtimym O fongfl; [>C- B WHl- 
^^Kimum Q farigfl DC- 1 MHz 



PvrT3*abiljFy (^|k 1 0. HI traniFtxnwr bvbw IdOhwIBn. 

PwmiolHli^ iiio]- 8.5. Rf IfaniFsrnwf 1o 10 irwMr). 

Piirnutnlllr (|u;-4.0. Ulnrndontm Hp.VHF. 

Pfoiw*,!!!, iia)-7S. DC. 40 Hi afn) EWI/SFI t.lwing. 

P(!«nwbi!ity lsKi]-75 DC. 60 Hi and EMI/RFI f<h<K;r>g. 



' Note Tafciai op^ifQIo qt 4 1:> IQO nfrtfci Ih^ tiowtd lf*qtfcncy ra.iga wihh t*ck.H:ftd O qrtd aFlicgiK-^ 

"Whftre the hard to find parts are found........ ond on hand" 

Calalog 6 included wiJhyour order (J3 a'la carl*]. 200 pcges, over 1 0.000 olectrCFnic PARTS includ- 
ing aimott any capaciPorflranarrilHnglomonDlylhic), r«ii£tor^ inducltx, wireorcablfl, h?roid^f#fril*. 
CotEini replacemeni part, anieftnaj conneckir {rf. compvtar, fC, «lKtricol|, tfiait, coiipilng. knob, 
motor, Iraniisi^^r. diode. EC. switch, raloy (^jid ilate tocontoctort], pro|Kl box, rubber feet, he res- 
wore [stainlojs, brasi, etc.). lubing, fan or blower, lube jfecelvin^ lo ifonjmllHng) or tube socicet. 
Pteo» add odeqyote shtpping (t3 ruin}. We accept VEja^ MC, Amexco, checks, COD odd $3. 
13>5Jon«St. •Omaha, NabKoka 6B102 • 402-34&-47J0 • fax:346-2939 

Surplus Sales of Nebraska 

16 RE-SHOPPER 



BACK-UP ALARM 



■ Prevents pwssible backing 
accidents 

' Detects utiseen objects 
behind a vehicle 

' Gives out a warning 
signal to the driver 

' Eliminates the guesswork 
vifhen parking in reverse 

' Never again will heavy rain, 
snow, or fog be a problem 




Easy installation onto 
the bumper 

Available in black, silver, 
chrome, red, ivory to match the 
color of your bumper 

' 30 day satisfaction guarantee; 
Full refund if not satisfied 



$49.99 



+ K.iO ship(iin; £ Hindlin^ 



Send check or money order to: 

Calco International 

18W0 Sherman Way Suite 51 1 
Reseda, CA 91335 

Tel: (818) 708-2334 
Fax: (818) 708-2362 



PENCIL-TYPE DtAM/ 
LOGIC TESTER. The 

Voltmaster 90S from Bel 
Merit Corporation provides 
a full range of digital-multi- 
meter and logic -test func- 
tions in an easily portable 
package. It hias a S/s-digit 
LCD with function annun- 
ciators and automatic po- 
larity indication. It offers 
automatic and manual 
range selection and data 
hold. Its functions include 
logic test, diode test, audi- 
ble continuity check by 
buzzer, AC/DC current 
measurement to 200 mA, 
AC/DC voltage measure- 
ment to 500 volts, and ohm 
measurement to 20 
megohms. All ranges are 
protected. The Voltmaster 
90S comes W\lh an operat- 
ing manual, two 1.5V bat- 
teries, power leads for 
logic tests, and test leads. 




CIRCLE 320 ON FREE 
INTORMATION CARD 

The Vo/fmasfer90S pen- 
cil-style DMt^ and logic 
tester costs $49.95 .—Bel 
Merit Corporation, 

14775 Carmenita Road, 
Norwalk, CA 90650; Tel. 
213-802-3666. 



Cable TV 



Descrambler Article Parts 

We stock the exact Parts for several articles published in Radio-Electronics 
magazine on building your own Cable TV Descrambler. 



February 1984 
SB-3 Type 

701 Parts Pkg $19.00 

Includes all originat parts. 

702 PC Board 7.95 

Original 3X4 etched, drilled 
and Silk-Screen pc board. 

704 AC Adaptor 7.95 

12 to 18 Volt DC @ 200ma. 

701, 702 & 704 29.00 

All three for special saving. 



February 1 987 
Tri-Mode 

301 Parts Pkg 29.00 

Includes all original parts. 

302 PC Board 7.95 

Original 5X8 etched, drilled 
and Silk-Screen pc board. 

304 AC Adaptor 7.95 

12 to 18 Volt DC @ 200ma. 

301, 302 & 304 39.00 

All three for special savings. 

Tri-Mode Tutorial. .7.95 

26 pages of in-depth info. 



May 1990 
Universal 

901 Parts Pkg $49.00 

Includes all original parts. 

902 PC Board.... ....9.95 

Original 4X7 etched, drilled 
and Silk-Screened pc board. 

904 AC Adaptor 8.95 

12 Volts AC @ 3 soma. 

901, 902 & 904.. ...59.00 

All three for special savings. 

CD22402E 12.95 

Video sync IC (10 -9) 



Snooper Stopper.. .$39.00 

Prevent Descrambler detection v/ith snooper 
stopper/data blocker and protect your privacy. 
Includes free article on Cable Snooping. 



Macrovlsion Kit.. .$29. 00 

Macrovislon now you see it, now you 

don't with our macro-scrubber kit. 
Originally Published in Radio-Eiectronics 



Signal Eliminator (tunable notch tnter) $29.95 

ELIMINATE a channel that you had unsuitable or CLEAR UP a channel that contains severe 
interference by eliminating it NOTE: If picture and sound are effected, this is interference and 
CAN BE removed. If only the picture is effected, this usually IS NOT interference and CANNOT 
be removed. Works on Cable or Broadcast TV. 

# 23H Tunes 50-66 Mhz & 6 Meter Ham , For channels 2 or 3.. 

# 46FM Tunes 66-108 Mhz; or any FM station. For channels 4, 5 or 6, 

# 71 3 Tunes 1 74-21 6 Mhz For channels 7, 8, 9, 1 0, 11 , 1 2 or 1 3. 
#1417 Tunes 120-144 Mhz For channels 14 (A), 15 (B), 16 (C) or 17 (D). 

# 1822 Tunes 144-174 Mhz For channels 18 (E), 19 (F), 20 {G}, 21 (H), 22 (I). 



58 Channel 

Cable TV Converter with Intra-red remote $69.95 

Re-Manufactured Jerrold 400 wltii new remote. Channel 3 output. 
Compatible with all External Descramblers. 



CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-332-3557 



Outside USA Call 1-508-699-6935 

Visa, MasterCard and COD. Free Catalog. 
Add $4.00 S&H, $6.50 Outside USA. 
D & D Electronics, Inc. PO Box 3310, 



VISA 



IVIC 



N. Attleboro, Ma. 02761 



CIRCLE 340 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



RE-SHOPPER 1 



5 SKCOND EPROM ERASER 

• A REVOLUTIONARY PRODUCT. 

• INCREDIBLE SPEED, ONLY 5 SECONDS. 
■ ONCE YOU USE IT, YOU'LL LOVE FT. 

* SAVE YOUR TIME & MONEY. 

* A MUST ITEM FOR THOSE PEOPLE HAVE 
EVERYTHING. 

* DIMENSION: 7- X 4" X 3". 

• ONE YEAR WARRANTY (EXCEPT UV TUBE) 

reE-9088 $249.99 



ELECTRONICS 
12 3 

A DIVISION OF MING E&P, INC. 



1. Bcciustve Herns at good price. 
S, Unique Kerns at better price. 
3. Popular Items at ttie best price. 

1-800-669-4406 

ORDER DESK ONLY 



DI61TAL VOICE RECORMR 

• ADM RECORDING SYSTEM. 

• INSTANT RECORD & PLAY BACK. 

• 4 MEGA BIT DRAM, PROVIDE YOU 2 
MINUTES OF HIGH QUALITY VOICE. 

• 16 SELECTABLE PHRASE CHANNELS. 

• PlASnC HOUSING W/ MIC & AC ADAPTER 

• BUILT-IN 500MW AUDIO AMP & SPEAKER. 

• FULLY ASSEMBLED & TESTED. 

DVR-120 $189.99 




RF REMOTE CONTROL SYSTEM 

19683 digital coding 
2 tiny tiatismitters 
ON/OFF confirming signal 
Dry contact relay output 
FCC approved 

SA-432 $49.99 



DEXXA MOUSE 

Superior tactile feedback switch 
50-750 adjustable dpi 
Opto-mecfianical design 
Microsoft mouse compatible 
UL and FCC approved 

DLX-MOUSE $39.99 




■Q 


ROM/SRAM DISK CARD 

For diskle^ PC station 
1 «id DOS & files instantly 
Battery back-up for SRAM 
watch-dog timer rebooting 

RDC-512 (512 KB, 0KB) $179.99 
RDC-1024 (1024 KB, 0KB) $199.99 



HRDBTECrOR 

Very small size (2i"Xl.rX1.4") 
Advanced SMT design 
Extra high RFI immunity 
Adjustable pulse count feature 
Security industry quality 

RK-3000 $49.99 




BARGAIN SALE 

SYNTAX Proto-typing PCB COMBO-1 $9.99 
SYNTAX Proto-typing PCB COMBO-2 $11,99 
SYNTAX Proto-typing PCB COMBO-3 S39.99 
SYNTAX Proto-typing PCB COMBOS $11.99 
SYNTAX Proto-typing PCB SUPER COMBO S69.99 



1. Price are subject to change without notice. 

2. VISA, MASTER CARD and COD(add S3) accepted, 

3. Freight charge add $S UPS Ground, $8 UPS Blue, S15 UPS Red. 

977 S. Meridian Ave., Alhambra, CA 91803 
TEL: (818) 281-4065 FAX: (818) 576-8748 



UntocJc th« muElvrlvK 
of the untversa. 
For inrormBtion cair 

(508) 832-6567 



KRV CIRCDITS 








mSTEK IELlECm®KllC& 

-f( (THE S A SPECIALISTS) p- 

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DRIEF me 5A IC Bnd ^A2D are the mti%\ soprnsttcuLefJ anil 
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~5. A. specincattons^ for superior perfDrmence. 

They heve no 'Jitters', no v^deo level proCilBms. no etlgnment 
ur quBIU^ conlrot prodlems. end no svnsltlvKu or aaslc design 
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the SA-3 (THIS IS tIDT AN SA-3 CLONE OF ANY KINDI) 

The 5A10 and SA20 neve a greet looking csblnet enclosure, 
the quolltg at whlcD would Tit In beeutlf ullg with a coffiponenl 
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The 5A10 end SAZO ere evalleDle fremHAITlB lUCTSIMICI 
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ASSAULT DESCRAnsLERS ere reedy to blow away the competition. 



• Superior Perlormance 
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■ Aulo Scramble Doled 

■ False Firing SwiLcli 



IT 

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• High QuBiily Control 

• Handsome Enclosure 

' Bum in Power Supply 

• Power On L.ED. 



3 C 



Jl 



■ CompeLlllve Pricing 



18 RE-SHOPPER 



[n](aitgjn](al[ai(a](al(a]ta][nl(a|(nl(n!jnl(n]tnJta](a](BJ 



THE ELECTRONIC GOLDMINE 

MINIMUM ORDER: $10.00 plus $3.00 Shipping and Handling 

We accept MasterCard, Visa and Money Orders 

Call or send for our free catalog! 

P.O BOX 5408, Scottsdale, AZ 85261 
PHONE ORDERS: (602) 451-7454 




m 

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$1 BLOWOUT SALE 



Tremendous bargains on prime 

component only $1 ,00 per pack 

n 50 1% Prea'sion Resistors* qtos 

Plastic Transistor PC Leads atos 

Capadtors-Disc & EiectrolyBc* ■••'•■ Qtot 

OUS C&Us n-ma 

Solar Sefisore 2™ 

Tmy 1/8W RssistofS* ^l?i 

1N40CM Diodes : °"J 

LEDs-[5ifferent Cotofs, Sizes* aill 

Circuit Board wilti Bubtile Readout 



Q 
D 

n 

D 
D 

n 

D 

a 

D 
D 
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a 

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20 
30 
2 
2 
40 
10 
12 
4 
20 
20 
20 
20 
10 
20 
10 
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071 2 
0713 



m 



Surface Mlg. Chip Capacilcxs*. -■.'■'. q-JJI 

Suffac© Mlg. Chip ResistofS* 

Silver Mica Capacitors* 

Micfo Red LEDs on Strip 

Tantalum Capadtor* 

9V Mini Zeners 

3MM Liltrabright Green LEDs 

Small Single Turn Trim Resistocs** ■ 
Oi'^-niM'^'nt^onn^r^ arx) wil cortin i^t mmxt v»fy«. 




Q716 
•0717 
•0718 
•Q71S 

0720 
0721 



Small diameter unjacketed fiber optic 
strand, Perfecl Iw lOOO's of applicaitions. 
Fun to ise and experiment wilh. 
C722 
SFt ptac* lor 49* Each 




COLOR 

BURST 

CRYSTAL 



^ 



MiniMuicCra. 3£?3S«MHi 

GB15 $1.00 Each 
10 for $9.00 



oiVti 






E: 



MAGIC 

SOUN 

SWITCH 



Trinen wiiti dtp ot lond. tint on kw 
mlljgg limps, mokid W>i StMiHlic 
OpHjiesoii J/DC. 

G65S $1.00 



BLUE BUTTON 
TIMER, 



Unique game timer Iratutes4 LEDs that 
extinguish one at a time over a ONE 
minute period as the unit increases its 
beeping . Great timer for games. 
Operates from W battery (not incl.). 
C723 
$3.9S 



BAG OF HEAT _ 
SHRINK ^ .^, 

Hindv isscrvntnt of 2Spa ol virious 

smshiociV [Q 31. ind .06* 1o ^'Oli. 

CI 79 $1.00 



POPULAR ITEMS 



HIGH QUALIIY! 

2 mil bags witti white block to wtHe on. 

Sold in packages oM 00 only. 

2x3- ^0663 — 100^3.30 

3 X 4 — G664 ~ 100/$3J5 

3x5 G665 — 100/$4.00 

4X6-— G666 — 100*5.50 



9VDC 
ADAPTER 



Great 
Barga'ml 




Perfect tot almost all 9V battery 
powered items. Has 9V snap, tilteied 
output. For 120VAC. 

G724 $1.69 




Sa\^^ 



INVERTER 
TRANSFORMER 

Srslt 4 [Bod Inr^ofmer tar uuwHh 
55S K to mmwt I2VDC to 25W rw 
sliDtmlluDmcst! tubes wiEh sdwnilic. 

N1703 $2.00 Each 
1,000 for $1,500 



cPENCIL SOW 
SOLDER IRON 



PsfstbrMdinoairb'l:. 
Oc»iaIran12IMC 

HI 200 $2.95 



4KV TRIGGER COIL 

For stn3tie tubs 



4I~}— 



^ 



JtufNITOO 
1 .2B Each 1 ,000 Iw tCSO 

1.4SEaelt 1.O0Ofar «700 



COPPER CLAD 
PC BOARD , 



Diin liciblt PC mloiil cin be cltI witi 
s£rssor^ Do little sided A* k S*. 
G591 75# 




SPECIAL PC SOLDER 

PfflecsoJderliyour 
VJts. low freftifnj, 
ctcdle^tcondLjclnrily, 
micii) thin sol ilec 
sum 031 Da nwle 
byKKlec 

MtMl — BFlCol 

H1M9 ILbRoll 



n 



— ft .50 



HORSESHOE 
STROBE TUBE 



StinlinJl-t/4'tall 



A1034 $3.75 



w 



ELECTREC 
ICROPHONE 



SensIfnIypiJFtcitilg 
G703 69« 



STROBE TUBE A 
TRIGGER COIL 



."^ 



Gm tsnta of mini inigM 
wnanbj tie i trigger col 

A1039 $1.75 



LASER LIKE LED 



aOOIUICDtJIIiibrlliinldeer 
juml!ocaeiiill£Ds 

A1012 3 for $1.00 
1,000 for $220 



[g 

(0] 

IS 
@ 

(g (0] m tH (s] ta! 



#65 DRILL BITS 




rung IN caiDiiie. 
M(si piifiulir sin for PC tait&. 
G725 3 for $2.00 



MICRO TOGGLE 
.^.S WITCH ^ 

SJWtffnnitii mounlins hiJitirat 
LI 806 $1.00 



FLASHING RED LED 



r]]s^tstttw1 6VDC is tpplioj 
naliiinujatiaie. 

G301 79« 



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GiRGLE 346 014 FREE INFORMATION CARD 



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1 f f f 9if ▼"'* 








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ELECTRONIC ROULETTE 



Numbers 1 thai 36, plus and 00 

(38 LED's). 

Game board for "betting" included. 

Automatic shut-off. 

As much fun to assemble as it is 

to play. 

Easy-to-follow instructions. 

A hands-on introduction to high 

technology. 



BT-805 

A game of chance, just like at 
all the casinos. No ball to lose, 
no wheels to spin. At the push 
of a button electronic sounds 
and flashing lights go off. . .and 
where they stop nobody knows. 





GRAND PIANO 



BT-802 



A kit that teaches ^u the basics 
of electronics, and a miniature 
piano to ptay once you're done. 
Instructions as simple to follow 
as do-re-mi. 



A 47-note memory allows you 
to replay your tunes over and over. 
15 notes spanning 3 octaves. 
Play your own originals. 
Or, set up to play your choice 
of 15 pre-programmed melodies. 
A hands-on introduction to 
high technology. 



OWI Incorporated 

1160 Mahato Place 
Comptor. CA 90220 
213,638.4732 
FAX; 213.638.83'*7 




STILL FRAHE TM PICTURE TELEPHOMC 

TRANCEIUER KIT 

Sends Slow Scan TU pici:ures over 
The Phone line in Twelve Seconds 



UCj^HTSC Video oiiti>ut ^u{ hoU<s 



UCjbHTSC Video oe<tpi<t ^u{ hoUKs 
±h^ ri 1 5p f. ay aj r a s er> as on c o ,-;-•■. :<ri d 



a a^d ifceceive. Pig^Iair^ oft afty T V 
lie Chip Replaces 156 SSI Pipsi 



15 t:o 58 Level s_^S35 
of 6re» Scale ^H^ 

TW FAX 5o„ 

4: L **^- 

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Phonvu 


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llDn.)(. 


Line^J 




* 




Videophone Chip 48P0IP 

and ScheMatic $56.95 

A/1> . DRAM, D-Reg . 9Zi..99 

PC Board CBARE) $18 . S5 

SBRes. Cap. Diode $28.75 



fc*^-. .» ^\^^ 3iiKes.uap.»»ode »^» . f3 
Hoduiai:on Cabinet Cuncu^> $12.75 
Use J^ Power Pack ^^^ $ 8.75 

ucl 1 ^ I TV Canera ^tfR $189.58 
Hod. I TV I rtonitor j^^^ $118.75 

Visa and FAX Order <213>827-1852 
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END PANELS ARE BLACK ANODIZED 



CHASSIS BOXES 




MODEl# WIDTH DEPTH HEIGHT 



MC-IA 


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MODSL 


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31.50 


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33.60 


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CIRCLE 345 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



Learn at home 
in y»ifr spare time 




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GRAY MATTER COMPUTING 



XT SYSTEM: 8088-10 with 640K, 360K Floppy, 2 parallel, 
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AT SYSTEM: 286-12, 1MB RAM, 1.2 Floppy, 2 ser, 2 par, 
1 game, 101 keyboard, 1:1 hd/fd Controller, 
monographic video card & monitor. $699.00 

386-25/64K Cache system includes 2MB RAM, 1 .2 Floppy, 
1 :1 hd/fd Controller, 2 ser, 1 par, 1 game port, 
1 01 keyboard, 1 6 bit VGA Card & monitor. $2085.00 

We wiff happily configure a system to fit your needs. 



WHY US 

Customer satisfaction 
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We know that you 
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take pride in providing 
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we enjoy it. 
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1:1 AT MFM HD/FDControiier $1 19.00 

1:1 AT RLL Combo Controiier $130.00 

XT MFM & RLL Controiiers $51 , $59 

360K & 1.2MB Floppy Drives $60, $76 

720K & 1 .44MB Floppy Drives $65, $78 

CMS Jumbo Tape Backup $295.00 






<^^' 




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laaxiaiB 



Hard Drives: 

40MB MR535 MFM 28ms RLL cert 
72MB Maxtor XT1 085 FH 28ms 
80MB HH1090 MFM 28ms 
100MB CP3104 IDE (AT) with kit 
200MB CP3204 IDE (AT) with kit 



$350.00 
$625.00 
$625.00 
$695.00 
$1070.00 



,,CA 92117 




P-C-B ARTWORK MADE EASY I 

Create Printed Circuit Artwork on your 
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* MENU DRIVEN 

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* EXTREMELY USER FRIENDLY 

* AUTO GROUND PLANES 

* 1X and 2X PRINTER ARTWORK 

* IX HP LaserJet ARTWORK 

• HP.and HI PLOTTER DRIVER optional 49.00 

REQUIREMENTS: IBM PC or Compatible, 3S4KRAM 
DOS 3,0 or later. IBM compatible printers. 

PCBoards - layout prcDgram 99.00 

PCRoute - auto-router 99.00 

SuperCAD - schematic pgm. 99.00 

DEMO PKC. - 10.00 

Call or write for more information 

PCBoards 

2110 14th Ave. South, Birmingham, AL 35205 
(20S) 933-1122 



PORTABLE DATA 
LOGGERS. A line of full- 
featured, rugged, data- 
gathering products that tie 
directly to thermocouples 
or voltage- or current-out- 
put devices has been intro- 
duced by MetraByte. The 
DDL-400 Series data log- 
gers, and the variety of 
available hardware and 
software accessories, al- 
low the user to configure a 
system to meet specific 
application requirements in 
tlie lab, factory, or field. 
The IBM-compatible, pro- 
grammable, menu-driven 
data loggers offer 16 ana- 
log input channels, fourdig- 
itat inputs, and 16 alarm 
outputs. A sealed-mem- 
brane keyboard on the 
front panel controls func- 
tions such as data-logging 
interval, Hi/Lo alarm limits, 
channel select/skip, and 
time/date settings. The 
LCD readout shows chan- 
nel data, alanm limits and 
status, time, and date. 

Each data logger re- 
quires a TCV-W I/O pane!, 



a slide-in module that has 
16 single-ended inputs for 
thermocouple, voltage, or 
current signals as well as 
1 6 logic-level alanm outputs 
and four digital input chan- 
nels for contact closures or 
logic levels. Each channel 
is independently config- 
ured by a 10-position range 
switch. Optional Applica- 
tions Software allows re- 
mote control of one or 
more data loggers. 




CIRCLE 321 ONFRiE 
INFORMATION CARD 

Every alarm in the sys- 
tem is independently and 
continuously checked at 
full speed at least every 
four seconds. Limit values 
are stored in non-volatile 
memory. 

continued on page 28 



22 RE-SHOPPER 



RAINBOW KITS I THE STRIPPER 




■ADA! SIGNAL 
DETECrot 

If you mink thai a sen- 
alt Ive radar dal actor la a 
tompllcatad place of 
equlpmaf>t» take a look at 
thia new kit. Ttils simple, 
yat affective, datactor 
circuit can be bulll In 
less than an frour and 
can tM tuned to respond 
to signala between 
50MHz to SOOGHz. It's a 
fun kit to build and play 
witti. A clgaretfa lighter 
plug Is Included. Size 
yxW oparatas on 9 to 
15vDC, 

KIT RSD-1 J12.95 



SntOBE UGHT 

If you need an attention 
getter, or warning ligfit, 
you need tfie strobe light 
kit. Use It for emarQency 
light for eutos, for model 
plifias or radio towars. 
Evan use It on your bicy- 
cle. Operates on B or 12v 
DC and baa a variable 
•trobe rets. 

KITST-I $8.95 



ncrrAL TBBIM<MEIEX 

Have you ever wanted to 
tall temperalure changes 
fast & accurately? The 
DT-1 kit will turn your 
digital volt meter Into an 
accurate digital thermo- 
meter with .1 degree res- 
olution. It gives you e 250 
degree window with a 
range froiV^ -40F to 300F 
degrees. It has a remote 
seneor .25" sq. Ihet can 
be rrxHjntecf many feet from 
the meter If need be. 

KIT DT-1 $8.95 




tUNlEVliGBIS 

Want to attract atten- 
tion? These kits are 
perfect for decorating 
name tags, lighting up 
your bet, or flaehing 
lights for your mode! 
trains. Some people use 
them to simulate s burg- 
tar alarm tor autos. Put It 
In a t>ox, set It on your 
dash and it looks like the 
real thing, ^ch kit con- 
tains two LEDsthal alter- 
nates flashing. Operates 
on a 9v battery. Size 
.5"k.S" 

KIT RB-2 $3.45 



CAPAOTANCe METtA 

' Tfits easy to build kit wlil 
turn your digital volt 
meter into a CAPACfTOR 
METER. Turn that junk 
box of unmarked capaci- 
tors Into a fortune. Meaa- 
urea capacitors from 
(ZpF to 2.2uF. Operates 
on a 9v battery. Size 
t.75"xl'' 

Kl r GA.2 $12.95 



WIRELESS ra H1I£ 

Smell biit mighty .8''xV' 
PCS, will really stomp 
out a signal well over 400 
yds. This is a buffered 
wireless mike thai oper- 
ates on 80 to 120 MHi 
FM. Comes complete 
with a microphone, and 
9V battery connector. 
Operates on 6 to 1 2* DC. 

KITWM-1 $12.95 




SURK mOOffiMIG EAB 

Use this BIQ EAR ampli- 
fier to listen ihrougb 
walls, hear conversa- 
tions across the room. 
Beef up Ihe sensitivity 
with a parabolic reflector 
and hear blocks away. 
Dim to the size, the BIG 
EAR can be bidden at>out 
anywhere. Use the ear- 
phones from a pocket 
transistor radio 10 liaten. 
Makes an ultra-sanslflvs 
Intercom. Can also be 
used as a general pur- 
pose 1.5W amp. We sup- 
ply a minl-mlcrophone in 
the kit. You can also use 
any B to 45 ohm speaker. 
Operates on 6 to 1 2v DC. 
Size 1"x1.75" 

KITAA-1 $10.95 




AC UN£ MmiTDR 

This la something every 
computer user, photog- 
rapher, or anyone that 
must maintain a safe 
usable AC line voltage 
should have handy. Mon- 
itor the voltage of your 
motor home's llOv AC 
generator Inside the 
motor home. Every tech- 
nician's bench needs 
this Item. The AC Una 
monitor wlil Indlcete, 
with multi-color LEDs, 
what voltage Is being 
distributed to your 
equipment at that par- 
ticular outlet. 
KITLM-110 $10.95 




U\ RATmtY MOKfTOR 

Have you ever been In 
your car, boat, or camper 
— you try to stirt your 
motor but the battery is 
dead? The SATTERY 
MONITOR kit uses the 
cigarette lighter plug 
outlet to monitor the true 
bdttery voltage. Multi- 
color LE[>s indicate the 
voltage In 1v steps from 
11v to 15«, green means 
great, yellow ia good, 
and red — call the tow 
truck or get out the oera. 
Size 1.2"x1.75" 

KITLM-12 KM 




PHONE HIG 

Small but mighty, so 
small It fit a anywhere. 
Telephone Una powered, 
never needs baiteriea. 
Transmits both sides of 
a phone conversation 
loud and clear, wireless, 
to eny FM radio at great 
distances away. Variable 
tunes 7DMHZ to 130MKz. 
It can also be used to 
make any phone a speak- 
er phone, Size .55"k1". 

KITTEL-B1 $10.95 



XXXXX RATED 



X WE HAVE THE BEST UfitT YOU 
CAN BUY AT ANY PRICE 



X AH. AUTOMATIC -NO CONTflOLS fJ.T 
1 CABt.£ IN - 1 CABLE OUT ■,^1. 



X USEOfiANYVCH 

X THE ONLY UNIT WITH THf 

ENHANCINQ SWITCH 
X tD(n4 MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 




VIDEO STABILIZER 




PBONE RECORDING 
SWnCH 

This telephone line 
powers switch is small 
enough to install any- 
where only ,9"J(.6". Every 
time someone picks up 
the phone tfie tape 
recorder will record both 
sides of the conversa- 
tion automatically. Use it 
In your office to record 
all phone conversetlons 
so you don't loaa that im- 
portant address you 
wrote on the tiack of an 
envelope. 

KITTEL-SW1 $10,95 



: If you rent movies you need THE STRIPPER 

\ When wMChfng rentat movEes you wEH noticft aflrtcylno pictura fb^hlng from tiark Lo 
\ UyM, color shifts, unwantsd linfla^ & pictura jUt«r». This ]> c«use<i by iho copy proiec^ 
\ tlan Lnstall«<t \n rhe vLdflo 1tp« by tha martufictunr. THE STIIPfER compLetAly 
; «Elmin«ies «JI copy protflciion ind givss you cryttaJ cliv copivv- 

i WE HAVE THE ENHANCING SWITCH 

: SOME NEW COPYGUARD SCHEMES REQUIRE ADDITIONAL CIRCUITRY TO 

; CLEAR THE PICTURE COMPLETELY OF UNWANTED LINES AND PICTURE 

; INTERRUPTION. THIS IS THE PURPOSE OF THE ENHANCING SWITCH, 

: NO OmSft UNIT on we market has wis FEATURE! 

' THE STRIPFHt'S Intended use Is to stabilize and restore crystal clear pic- 
'■ lures to prerecorded video lapes (or your plersonal viewing enjoyment. 
: Electronic Rainbow doesn't recommend using The Stripper to duplicate 
; perfect copies from rental tapes in your own fiome tor your personal use. 



BUSY PBOKE UGffT 

Add thia little kit to any 
or all of your phonos. 
When any extensions are 
In use the LED will light. 
Uses a 9v battery. P.C. 
Board t'x'rt". Complete 
with etched a drilled 
PCS, all pans and ache- 
rratics. 

KIT TEL-UT-I $9.95 




VOICE ACnVATED 

swrrca 

This vox can be used to 
operate a tape recorder, 
ham radio, CB radio. Use 
it to tum on an alarm. 
The output can operate a 
load up to fOOma It will 
operate a relay, lights, 
motor, or LEDs. What 
could you do with 'a 
sound activlated switch? 
Size i.S"ii1.25" 

KIT V0X.1 $6.95 



UEDEIECIOR 

Thia kit can be great fun 
al parties. Lie and an 
audible lone will change, 
the more you lie the 
mors the tone changes. 
When you lie your palms 
& forehead sweat. This 
kit allows you to m«as- 
ure these changes. Only 
a very slight amount of 
change will cause the 
tons lo increase in fra- 
quency. Operates on to 
')2v DC. Size 

KIT LD-1 19.95 



¥ 

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t 



BUILT 



COMPLETELY 

$49.95 



WARNINQ: Use ot thia device to 
duplicate copyright material may be 
sgainaL certain federal & stats laws. 



itifk ifififlHrifk itit friririiifiritit iritltifirirkitirinrirk 

THIS MANUAL 
CONTAINS ALL 
SCHEMATICS, PARTS & 
P.C, BOARD LAYOUTS 
FOR ALL OF THE 
RAINBOW KITS. USE 
YOUR OWN PARTS TO 
CONSTRUCT ANY OF 
OUR KITS. 

KIT BOOK $14.95 



$5,00 OFF IF YOU 
BUY ANY KIT, 

*•*■*•**••*••**•*♦**•••****•***•■*• 

TV NOTCH FILTERS 

OUR TV FILTERS ELIMINATE UNWANTED TV 
CHANNELS OR ANY INTERFERENCE THAT 
ALTERS BOTH THE SOUND AND VtDEO. 




Channels available 2 thru 6 & 14 thru 22 
Specify a specific channel when ordering 



CHOICE 
95 

.EACH 



14 



N OTE: AH Tv Fnitt Kin tn »h io* AdwcJiitonai pMpai+i pn\-f. Vqu rhiki frbiiiA immiiif 
**vi ifom fwn bui ciuit c*np*rty t^lot wiAffl thai* nn«» Oft rcnw C*N* syilWfl- 

•••••■»■»•••»••••••■»» * **•»••••••••» 

Please add sufficient postage 
Wt will sccept teiapftone ardan for Viu & Maitsrcsrd 



To Order Call 
317-291-7262 



1 MOMVrCmi 1 



lElECTROniC RflinBOUJ 



6254 LaPas Trail • Indianapolis, IN 46268 



RE-SHOPPER 2 



TOP 

SKOll 



PHOWE COLOR BOXEE 



I DmgnAd Of rTHm PTUSIKV IS rnOfW UW DCH0t 
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l irtg^ Oonfanndog; Plv>Mk Hflbry. Plui N uHfA vlmplQ 
I and (hdJ l^iorw ckciMt plant Morf 1 Mnuili $^ 



HIGH VOLTAGE DEVICES 



HV DSvl-CiB ' 5/UJi Gla; f^JSiT. Frod- Canff; ym(v.ffJtf; 
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Jactib'x LadnsT, Piavns jm? i/an tf* G/affff c^ns ; 
FancQ Cftariof: GtitQ*/ Counr*/,- 0/<wt9 6*11^ hit* 

rjjef, 9(c tIftYtcii. SHOCH.\HQ\ $29. 



EM BRAINBLASTER 



J PJani (w POWBJ^I CLECTROHAaiiEnC WEAFQHS 
mana LAB DCVICES. Optimum cjfcuits. frvqs. iVAye" 
I formL mttnv[i«. U IHO BOOaLlHCt] |». 



RADIONICS MANUAL 



I c!(CllJri'Q fllflClrfiiTiHgrifltiC tnsnpiftl ■ Sj&mii rDA 
lApprovM Hi»l»ry. dncjipeiors^ pLnnj (dOJen; ur- 
I citila^.dvAiLahlilieADJ AAD/OMCSDfVTUffromHny 



SECRET S SURVIVAL RADIO 



Qptimijin lurvivAl' dfid Bfcufity fiaiiD squjpjriBnL 

m*hrtidi (reqtwncy sltooibCins. voicfl/dai* *cramWin<3 f 
('ncoding Incjudn imDH r4'C«ivfift aind xmanvra, 
tBi awa lry. enlvrw cipbrmuitiarta. rArrMM rVKyvKoTi^^ 
contrDJ. MCurtty. iufv«tltDric«. antct uhra.KrHC. Fitwcfi'iic 
iflfrsred commo 70* Cfrcuil*. *2Bl 



DECODERS/CONVERTERS 



PHONE RECORD, INTERFACES 



rlgn} njT undal^lablQ (urLra-ni inpul 1 iTipAoa ncoji, 
jfidmructibla TEL£CO H PER ip ^eccrd phone conver- 
sfltorts Alsomdnilonior tm-^s, lap^ PluSi&nnple PM 
Xoiinar plan* PtifS o«r-pavrcyng SHRIEK CiRCUIt 
oiarA $14. Modulft f T«L SHRIEK UOOUL£ ttS. 



STEALTH TECHNOLOGY 



Po[ic« ri0i,r It lafcmalmi 

1CI%-20Hi 'Evory hinown 

mitenil to minimize radar r*lVBcbijn - Smisgy and 

tactif: lo fioM uojuil radar ttckals (Ihil cost you b 

Fortune in iniur^nce} - htftitidd lo dBtsci and jam 

Eiignalt - datcribadi tTir 



CONSUMERTRONICS 

2011 CRESCENT DR.. P.O. DRAWER 537 
ALAMOQORDO, NM SB310 

1-505-434-0234 

I AddS^aJiip (USA, Cjiri:LdJ| lUlct'Smii^FDin slock COO 
I (UPS c»lf> only], VISA Of^(J*l»^«C*^d OP. lOO- Mcntp 
I Computer and ilACCTCinic Olftn" FREE Tacti. CtMo^ 

I wfln ordw. T'JWK *nbuViniiM »*Kfl ig?1 A» W*fi Cifi TV 



ROeOFONE AUTODIALER 



to dial any number lup to 10,000) or mix ol local »rKl 
long distance ptiono numtxrrs <n ar^y otde-r, ovcii arvy 
Iqnglh ol lima, whcEhor busy or onvwere*] (your 
Choice^ ana log the nmoi. comiTiinda and lesuits lo 
monitor, pnntar ind-m diiJt Oucck-dial directory o4 up 
to 600 num&era* BUSV rediel oplioni Dnecl mod*m 
cojviina.i>a and conlrdi* Ml t*»iun codas, includ>ing 
VOICE and R1N4:^IM(j Optional shell lo tarmmaJ 
profltam ijpon COMiHECT EjiiI to Menu or 60S Hot 
tMlcbing]. IdDal a? k "Wi.rg»mei" dialer, phone call 
logge-r and iel«markelmd dialer Qttk* • Manual il^. 
WjIR LAIl£Ul and LETTEIt$ programs t49. Oplkvul 
' ' ' eriaca t29S. 



HARD DRIVE MANUAL 



HBialn 10 wr rv/tl Drive and GOrttrOIW 

lomptuvi on PC/XT j'AT/MCt H(ml09*bacl>ntar1«ce, 

inFtiaiixe, Mt up., ine tfiern i^w ki mainiain, trouble' 

jjTrKUBfljMirihem Hffwto pfotocl them from mtHaket, 

sabotagm„ prying tryea, tbcky Fingara How to racovw 

ilarntseiCl arvd lost 1ile« Induce 

tAitcf\ rfilt k>und nowtwr« atie' tit. SAVE.1SS1 



DISK SERVICE MANUAL 



Mwntain. tro^jwesriioot. repair, ad|U9i, a»ign Floppy 
Drives wittioul special equipment or sofewaie • 
5r29''fXi''/t: PC/XT/AT/3t£, Appiu. CofmMtOttrw, 
Aajrp/D, TMnt/jf, eptwt, AtMfi, fi. HP. DEC, elc 



DtSK DRIVE rurORIAL 



ruedry, practical tacit on Floppy Driwt, Diwt, rDCt^ 1 
Form^nin^, :^}lware PrOleCtiOn ror Ihe ty«t«ins de- 
scribeo aPov« invAltiaPle ndvice and lipt on how to I 



COMPUTER PHREAKING 



TROJAH KOnSES, VlnUScS, WORMS, etc, and 
CoujItvrMBUUrefft - irKludM Ditk' With 2S0K* ol 
prif eaKing lexl Mes and dish - prolectiH» prcnnuns.. and 
the graal FLU8HOT+ Disk'< {lEHUv'i Chc«ce. PC 
IMLAOAZFMEJ' Dozant oE CompuWr CrinU and Abu«a 
MeViodt, ar>d CouritatMeuures. How ayrtemrs are 
perteirvied. 6B5 Achicv: PWfword Dtteatt: 2oa PTiraah- 
Term Glouirv much more. 3 Itoiuali ■* 3 Dieka* S3JL 



KW-HR METERS 



I How (Hflctrkc energy metan worf, ciitDffndfi, rnany 
I trror modes, ANSI Standards Demat>d Melen, Pole 
I Meters, Polypha-w Meiers; meter cioe-p; overload 
I aroott. $JtL 



POOR MAN S SUPER LASER 



nupy Hod Liter Ptant Uted m iniruiior> sysiemt, 
waapon« tairgating, pjvcise opiical alHgrmsnEs, saismo- 
graptiy. argnating and commo, strobe), hdlograptiy, 
acianca projecis, ate rnciudes a lisi of dojenj oi 
em-rces lor ruby rod? and oihar pam il4. 



STOPPING POWER METERS 



A$ REPORTED OM CftS "AD UINUTES "1 How certain 
ete ci rical h»d« can ilow down Pqiw Uetert ^ even 
atofi tlh»m ^ whtt* drawHn^ tuH teadal Also desc^nbes 
Pok VMtn, H«t«f Cmp and I>wl9»d thooi^ (TS. 



BRAIN VIRUS ANTIDOTE 



The PAKI^TAHt WUIH VIRUS piaSUBd ddEi 

universities and busineues The mildly desir 
original vertidxt i* hack»d into highly virulani a 
BRAIH VIRUS ANTIDOTE consbtts of the antn 
■AurcHCtHJeand wriia-uD DWt" fHOT kitocHMl . 



BEYOND VAN ECK PHREAKING 



mvasurea tncludettHalVvnE&ku^sft. Now includes 
iinal VAN ECK DC&IOW3I t2S, 



ATM Crinwi, Abuaw, SacurHy, VukwabiNliu tOi>* 
melhodi deacrlb«f - from Baa E lo ciphers C»e 
HAvWL Law. C01Frilarme*9Ur9f^d«M6d SfajMyChadt- 
\\ii Frttarrul PhototV Racontfy, a crook siole i33J.O0O 



THE I.G MANUAL 



LIBERATE GAS & WATER 



SURVIVAL GUNS & AMMO 



THE ULTIMATE SURVIVAL MANUAU Oeacrlbes 

optimum weapons and ammo to pick, conversidns of 
commonly available samtautos lo bh«uI1 weaports, 
silencers. expl£nivB device«. improviiad. End Times 
scenarios, ^etrfihats. elc JT9, 



VOICE DISGUISER 



Kians tor' nea.t device^ 10 cnange vDica 'rec^uenciH 
Etfactjva againsl snoops using vo»c:e analysers, to 
DOr^cevi gender lor woman hvir^g aiorve. lor elecbonic 
garT>*3jor inli'inlruBton sysiems, Iqr muticaFaccdtn- 
paniment; for seances, as a gag; as a dcKirbell 
subttitule; etc t19, Modulir 199- 



VORTEX GENERATOR 



I M«at/co«l wilh Simple, amazhrtg 3-Pd<1 Devic* Uses 

I no n>ovrrig pans. ete^tf»ciiy. lossi4 fuel, liquid or itton 
I Ouaranlwl Scienttfical ly Sound Plans t14. 



ROCKET S RED GLARE 



How to dest^n and build solMl-fuel rKkeU beyai^d 

modflH rocketry. Special etnphaaiaon the fdrmulitiori, 
manufaclure ar>d irisiallBlion ol prdpeJlanls. nvtitofs 
and igmlers And ihe design ol leur^ch pddt and 
electronics 919. 



ABSOLUTE SECURITY 



Dozens of wmple. versalile. secure CompiilSi' Socunly I 
meihodv. UpS. Plu$ ou/ invulnaraUa Cipher Program 1 
{in COM incf ils BAS Source] Plus Sl.QOOl 
CIPHEH COMTEftT rulai wllh Ciphertexl f 



CRYPTANALVSIS TECH 



Litfl iSPOwaitulM4HVj^Drtv«nCiyptDPro{pima(in.COMarid 
m BAS SoyrceJ *o Aniiyife Oecrypi -Sftcufe" aphw- 
lextA. £jtamp(ei. Recommanded in Sie presltg^ous 



THE SILKWOOD 



I bmaii, aimpia (2-luj, efreci 
I higti voltage, heavy /special bsiiariH, or special 
I lubes Rivdieuori i& everywi^erc' Proiwct your heeJih' 
I Plana $14. 



THE GOLDFINGER 



Matal doTacior trnds GOLD, SILVER, PLATINUM, 
COPPER, ALUMINUM, Rejecli all Icrrojnagneiio 

dbjBCU Simple circurl Pitins $14. 

■OLD f on [OUCAlrOHAL PUiUP-OStS Q««tY- 



STOCKPRO 



unKtufi, Kowerrui. :^rawd, UnconventiPrUl Cornrrton 
Slock Invntmeni Strategy. C^eatad for NMSU. Basis 
rtf nKn*n!tJiM(^nnsijllinnsvslam Manual '^Dlak* 129. 



PRINTER/PLOTTER MANUAL 



Types-. Uascripiions. 9P4Cb. and luU''' inieriaces 

(ParalMI, Sarial). Detailed Plans of X-Swiichert, 
Buffers, and Sana] -To - Parallel and Parallal-To-Semil 
Davicea. Many lervtcet repai{. buy, ita* tipe. <:7B, 



SUPER RE-INKING METHOD 



Re-Ink Cloth Rkbbor^E lor about SO cents and tO 
minules «ach Plans tor El Cheapo Moior^Ddven ^e- 
Inker. Commonty used inx (5 colors] and earner 
descri' ' ' ' ' 



SOFTWARE PROTECTION 



UnKfue syKteflt that highly discounffB coedy » 
piracy whil«nDlinlar1trlrigwi4^'kigirtardiPralcopws No I 
krvy^nrrvfthodofdeNANDspocvlecMpmerHreefuired. I 
Easy, autotfultd lo iftttaH Ck\ ba uatd with any other- 1 



SPECIAL PROJECTS 



We [>B9^n, ^Md, Repair, Mod rV. Maintain arid CoTiUR 
on any Devicn, SyEMem or Project ^ Computenied. 
EJeclroniC- Electrical. Mechanical Opteel - many 
invention protdtypaa Cdnlidenlhallty guaranteed 
Describe erv) include f?$ non- refundable fee We 
than pfovwla you co*l^ time astirnaies 



TECH RESEARCH SERVICES 



UrVKiue 42K (lectronrc, computer d'Tsign anhclea m 
database acce^swl t>y tiiie, uibject DigilBk uP. uC 
analog, (rybnd. nomogriph. jaftware Provide us keys. 
weraturnlisiprig £23npn>reiundaDies<4rcMee1t-^ 
keywords/ phrn^^ ^vetydu R&D$SSl 

*&stiwafQ luppons PCD05, MSDOS, PS/2: Mo4io, 
Here , CGA, EGA, VGA; S 25"', 3 S". hard (specity your 
floppy drive sugj 



REMOVE ICS FASTER 




with this simple invention than any other method, including 
$6,000 vacuum desoldering stations. Salvages hundreds of good 
IC's per hour from junk boards, and also speeds up repairs. 
Won't damage IC's or circuit board. Removes 6 thru 40 pin IC's. 
This is a money making labor saving tool. Order novi». We pay 
shipping on prepaid orders. 

Complete set of 8 desoldering bits ^ 07 * 7 J 



LEARN THE SECRETS OF HOW TO FIX 
ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT FASTER ON OUR 



REPAIR TECHNIQUES ON VIDEOTAPE 

Learn our techniques and make more money repairing electronic 
equipment. These tapes are packed v^ith much practical information 
that will save enough of your valuable time to quickly pajf for 
the tapes. 

Learn from an expert what fails, why it fails, how to find it faster, 
and how to fix it faster. 

Much of this information is available nowhere else. 

These tapes start at the beginning for beginners, but cover each 
subject JO thoroughly, that even old pros will learn valuable new 
techniques and skills. 

Send payment with order and we will pay shipping. Order all 14 
tapes and send payment with order and get a 10% discount. (Send 
SS03.37 for all 14 tapes.) Order now. 

How to usea Voltmeter (I hr. SI min.) Sli.K 

How to use 1 logic probe and logic pulser SH.K 

All about resistors and their failure modes (I hr.) $39.!5 

All about capacitors and their failure modes (I hr, 2B min.) $39.9S 

All ibout Inductors and their failure modes, Part I, Includes 

inductors, transforniiers, flybacks, pinhall coils, solenoids iW.K 

All about inductors and their failure modes. Part Z. Includes 

magnetic clutches, relays of all types, other devices. (58 min.) Slf .9 S 

All about diodes and their failure modes. IrKludes rectifiers. 

SCR's, Zenert, triats, LED's (SS min.) SJ9,9S 

All about transistor failure modes (54 min.) SJ9,9S 

How to solder like a pro — with lots of time saving circuit board 
repair techniques, including some of the fastest ways to cKange 

tCj you ever saw (I hr, 30 min.) , S39,M 

All about electrical contacts, connectors, connections their failure 
modes, common and uncommon problems, symptom:, good cures .... S39.9S 

How to use the oscilkiscope (to track down digital failures] S39.9S 

How to read schematics and use them for troubleshooting, Part I. 
Covers monitors, how to find monitor problems with wiring 
diagrams, gives symptoms, where to look, covers both raster scan 

and X-Y monitors (St min.) SJ9.95 

How to troubleshoot digital integrated circuits — includes micro- 
processors, what goes wrong & how to find It, how to use the 

best literature on IC's and where to get it (I hr. 45 min.) , S39.?5 

How to select and hire the best electraiilc technician. It takes 
one to know one, and believe ut they are not all created equally 
excellent This tape will save management and you a lot of grief 
if it keep* them from hiring a dud S39,9S 



VIDEO REPAIR 

P.O. BOX 813-RE 
SELMER.TN 38375 



SCHOOL 
(601)287-1594 



» RE-SHOPPER 



CIRCLE 351 ON FREE INFORMATION CAfID 




PRELCO 



605 CKestnut St • 
TEL: 201-851-8600 



Union, N, 
FAX: 201 



J. 07083 
-686-4656 




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1.K) 
1.25 
1.60 
1.25 

o.ao 

0.86 
\M 
1.75 
1.46 
1.26 
1,26 
1.75 
1.95 
1.95 
1,00 
1.26 
CM 
l.ftS 
1.55 
2,75 
2,95 
I.IH 
2.60 
1.»0 

las 

3.75 
1>5 
0.85 
1.76 
2.36 
1.75 
1.TO 
1.90 
3.10 
2,76 
1.96 
1.95 
2J0 
3^80 



CA3217e 

CA3218E 

CA3224E 

CA3234E 

CA323eE 

CA3237E 

CA3238E 

CA7e07E 

CA7811E 

C0224a2E 

CX770 

CX20ai7 

CX2303S 

CXA1019 

0NeS38 

DTAIM 

0TA1MES 

DTC114E8 

DTC114F 

DTC124E8 

0TC144 

0TC144E8 

GH3F 

HA1139 

HA1166 

HA1187 

HA133S 

HAiaet 

HA13e9R 
HA11227 
HA11423 
HA11714 
HA11747 
HAt20a3 
HA12413 
hU 17455 

Hoxaao 

HDSOMI 

HDei40(2 

IH240a 

lR2(ia 
insEoi 

iR2E02 

IHC5 

KA33V 

KA1222 

KA21D1 

KA2102A 

KA2130A 

KA220e 

KA2281 

KA22e3 

KA22ei 

KA2ei2 

KA3213 

klA7t37 

KIA7S40 

16930 

LAUSO 

LA11S5 

LA1201 

LA 1210 

LA1222 

U1231 

LA1245 

LAI 280 

LA138S 

LA3115 

IA31H 

LA3ie0 

LA3a01 

LA3220 

LA3301 

LA3310 

U33S0 

LA^eo 

LA33ei 



LA4031 
LA4ia2 
LA42S1 



1,76 
ZM 
5.96 

8.9e 

1.7S 
1.76 
1,95 
1.96 
8.M 
3.76 
8.1D 
3.«i 
4.90 
1.75 
0.59 
0.90 
046 
HAS 
0.69 
O.H 
a69 
1.95 
2.99 
1,39 
1.80 
590 
2.70 
2.70 
1.50 
E2S 
5.50 
7.60 
1.26 
1.50 
0.90 
5.70 
3.76 
7.90 
IJO 
1.60 
i.50 
1.60 
O.M 
1.56 
1.50 
0.5S 
1.80 
1.46 
1.76 
1.46 
1^ 
1.20 
2.50 
0.86 
1,10 
2,75 
1.66 
1.80 
1.50 
0,95 
1,86 
1,86 
1.6S 
1.76 
1.80 
D.8S 
1.3S 
1.2S 
0.80 
0.95 
0.80 
146 
0,^ 
1.75 
1.76 
1.25 
2.20 
2.50 
2,76 
1.90 
£.96 



LAU12 
LA6621D 



LA7031 
LA7032 
LATOSO 
U7210 
LA7e07 
UT52a 
U7B30 
LA79S0 
UTBOO 

unx 

LA7«10 

LB 1403 

LB1406 

LB14M 

LC4081B 

LH317T 

LM324N 

LM337UT 

LMaurr.e 

LH34OT4 

LM34(yr-8 

LM340T'12 

LM340T.1S 

LM360T 

LM377N 

LM38CN 

LU3S4N 

LM65aCN 

LM1310N 

LH1S19N 

LM182ZN 

Ulil1823M 

LM18BBM 

LU1$77N9 

LM1S80J 

LM18ft5N 

yil2877P 

Ly2901N 

LM8361 

LM8690 

LU11827B 

US218P 

H627SL68 

U47O20 

U61307BSP 

M64618P 

U688ieP 

U5ee2ef 



UAB8481P 

UBaioe 

UB8728 

uBse3(» 

MBFUoas 

UBR3045 

Mciaosp 

MC1361P 
MC1367P 
MC1394P 
MC3357P 

Mcraoecr 

MC78iaCT 
MC7SL15Ca 
MC79L18CO 
MC7SMD5CT 
MC78M09CT 

MC79W12CT 0,20 

WJimtXT 0,30 

MC7eMieCT 0,20 

MC7S02CT 0J3Q 

MC79C6,2CT 0.3S 

MCTgOSCT 0.30 

MC7«a8CT 0.30 

MC7ai2CT 0.30 

HC78U12CT 0,20 

lilDA970-1 1.45 

M:JE200 0.60 

MJE340 0.90 

HJEiaooT a.«a 



1.26 
1.25 
1.10 
1.90 
6.20 
2.00 
2.65 
1.60 
2.76 
2.76 
3.75 
2.25 
2M 
1.10 
1.10 
155 
2.10 
0.46 
0,76 
0,95 
0,90 
0.30 

0.x 

0,30 
0.x 
0,X 
1,76 
2,M 
1,26 
1.66 
0,56 
1.35 
2:60 
5.95 
5,96 
2,40 

2,es 

2,95 
2,76 
1,80 
1.7S 
3.10 
3,10 
3,00 
0,90 
0.60 
2.45 
6.26 
1.x 
2.95 
2.95 
£45 
4.10 
1.35 
245 
8.76 
2.15 
2.15 
1.26 
2.95 
146 
140 
1.7S 

0.x 
0.x 

0.26 
0.26 
0.20 
0.20 



MU&3S8N 

MM5387 

MU6402N 

HM546W 

MM7317BN 

MN12«on 

MM183A 

MW168 

MN8178 

MN158S3 

MP19D9 

MPC674J 

MPSA13 

HPSUlO 

MRf421C 

MRFMAC 

MFV:841 

MW=644 

MHF901 

MRF91t 

MSL218 

MSL9372 

MSM6S26 

MUR30a5 

MUftX15 

PKnz 

RC555N 

SAB3038 

SAe3037 

SAF1039P 

3109794 

STA401A 

STK011 

ST1C4S3 

STK4 19211 

STX5372 

STKM71 

STK6479 

8TR380 

STTOSIA 

STFU61 

STH2013 

STO3115 

STB312S 

STR313S 

STn30123 

STB301X 

TA7117P 

TA7137P 

TA7142P 

TA71S7P 

TA7160P 

TA7223P 

TA7230P 

TA7297P 

TA732SP 

TA7330P 

TA7331P 

TA7335P 

TA7342P 

TA7343P 

TA7353P 

TA736aP 

TA7378P 

TA7907P 

TATeilP 

TA7«13P 

TA7914P 

TA782SP 

TA7e30P 

TA7840P 

TA7644P 

TA796eP 

TA78e8AP 

TATSTOP 

TA7878P 

TATeeOP 

TA7887AP 

TA77T7N 

TAtllOP 

T1A810AS 

TBAnOM 



3.00 
1J9 
046 
1,60 
1.W 
246 
3.16 
3.78 
240 
3.76 
340 
1.56 
0J6 
0,65 

13^ 
8.80 

12.76 
7.96 
1.10 
1.26 
2.78 
3.76 
2.76 
1.72 
1.72 
0,X 
0.16 
3.75 
2.06 

1.x 

0.75 
2.60 
445 
6.20 
11.60 
6.x 
5.10 
6.10 
4.76 
4.7B 
6.25 
6.x 
4.75 
4.75 
4.75 
4.76 
4.75 
2.70 
1.10 
245 
1J0 
2.10 
146 
1.75 
2.26 
1.25 
2.55 

1.x 

0.00 

1^ 

1.86 
140 
1.25 
1,» 
1.85 
1,86 
2.x 
2.55 
1.76 
1.76 
1,60 
6.76 
1,75 
1.x 
6,75 
4.10 
4,76 
2J0 
5.76 
1.75 
13S 
0.96 



2.20 

1.60 
1.60 
1.7B 
2.76 
IJO 
1JS 
X30 
240 
2.10 
246 
0,96 
1.26 
1.66 
1.66 
2.86 
1.60 
1.66 
2Jia 
9.10 
4.20 



TCS14EP 

TCAS30 

TCASUSM 

TGMSOO 

TCP4e21 

■n)«2ioeP 

7DA1067 

TDA10«3 

TDAIITO 

TCiAllBOZ 

TDA1220A 

TDAISTSA 

TDASJxraV 

'rDA20O8V 

TDA2577 

'n)A2K0M 

'n)A2S22U 

T0A3iga 

TDA3664M 

TDA3670 

TDA3963CQU 3.86 

TOM505A 8.76 

"n.7S3C 

TLP690Q 

TMC1073 

TMS1026 

T1ilS1046 

TMS1071 

TM31761 

TUS19U 

TMS1962 

™S3460 

TMS3461 

TMS3462 

TMS3496 

THC2073O 

U419B 

WITB 

UA7S7 

ULN21iaA 

ULN2212 



ULN2218 

ULN2224 

ULN229 

ULN22Z0 

ULN2291A 

ULN2290e 

ULN38iaA 

ULN385e 

UPA53C 

UPASOC 

UPC27C 

UPC35eC 

UPC3a3C 

UPC654C 

UPC671H 

UPC674 

UPC676C 

UPCM6 

UPCS87C 

UPC592H 

UPC1018C 

UPG1029 

UPCIOISM 

UPC1197C 

UPC1204C 

UPC1213C 

UPC12S3C 

UPC1360C 

UPC13S2C 

UPC1383C 

UPC1J71C 

UPC1S73H 

UPC137SH 

UPC13(7flC 



1.36 
1.50 
340 
4.96 
6.80 
4.50 
245 
2.M 
£M 
2.M 
24S 
246 
246 
1.60 
3.10 
2.x 
2.76 
1,76 
145 
245 

1.x 

1.06 

1.x 

1,85 
2.10 

1.x 

1.95 
146 
IJO 

1.x 

225 
^M 

IlK 
IJO 
1.20 
1J0 
1.26 
445 
1.26 

4,10 
2.76 
1.26 
1.76 
146 
1.66 
2.60 
1.25 
1.36 
240 
2«5 
2J0 

toa 

140 
1.80 



UPC1382C 

UPC1X1 

UPC 1470 

UPC 1473 

UPC1613 

UPC16U 

UPC1620C 

upa29i 
UPD2az 

UPDftiOC 

UPD048 

UPO1200 

UP012r»C 

UP01704C 

upoiToe 

UP01937C 
UP01»43Q 

UPDi98ec 

UP01997C 

uptwwr 
uPMoera 

UPH091 

UPD46«e8 

UPO8104C 

upoem 

UP0753eC 

UP076109 

X0137 

121-I85 

121.1014 

121-1028 

121.1035 

121-1M7 

14DN158 

14DN197 

14DN209 

14DN233 

15.3X59 

1M7701 

IMTTOe 

15.37704 

15JW207 

15.39209 

15-39208 

1W1927 

1541784 

15430M 

1543703 

16-46300 

221-42 

221-43 

221-4501 

221-48 

221-«i 

22177 

221-79 

221-7»01 

221-S7-01 

221-02 

22147 

221.07,01 

22147-Oe 

221-10241 

221-104 

221-106 

221-109 

221-111-01 

S!1-140 

KM 57-02 

221-16»«3 

221-19001 

221-194 

221-175 

221-177 

221-178 

221-179 

221-190 



1.70 

140 
1.10 
1.111 
1.35 

1.x 

2.76 
2.95 
2.96 

3.95 
5.66 

8.95 
2X10 

2J» 

6.x 
2.10 
2.60 
1.96 
1.86 
046 
0,36 
046 
0,60 
2.10 
846 
4.96 
646 
3.06 
045 

0.x 

0.70 
0.70 
0.75 
S.X 
9.M 
6.76 
6.10 
1.25 
2.05 
1JS 
1.76 
4,95 
2.2S 
2.x 
2.20 
4.10 
440 
1.35 
l.X 
1.70 
2J1S 
2.x 
1,76 
1.99 
320 
2JS 
1.75 
2.15 
0.95 
1.75 
1.76 
1.76 
2.86 
1.06 
2.10 
2^ 
0.76 
3.76 
1.86 
1JS 
2.15 
2.78 
6j05 
1.K 

^M 

t.96 
5.96 



221-192 

221-193 

221-213 

mi -261 

221-2S7 

221-286-02 

221-286-03 

221-291 

221-303 

221-304 

221-343 

221-M7 

22141S 

^1419 

221-493 

221-619 

221-628 

221.646 

442-58 

442« 

442-74 

66D3-1 

6809-1 

690^-1 

68024-1 

55026 

673319-10 

8101424 

910410-2 

910442-1 

810458-2 

610457-2 

810471-1 

510651-1 

812024-1 

812042-2 

912044-1 

912090-1 

912070-1 

912072-1 

9120794 

912079-7 

912094 

912106 

912120-1 

912208-1 

912306.1 

812331-2 

812337-3 

812337-5 

«1233»'3 

ei 23474 

912361-1 

912405-1 

912442-1 

912446-1 

912479-3 

912480-1 

DU32 

DU5a 

OMSe 

DM109 

DM112 

DMie3 

DS1D2 

10-13 

IC-27 

10-32 

PC00OO49 

PCOOOOGO 

PC000061 

PCOOOOOS 

pcoooon 

PC2M18 
PC20919 
PC20923 



1^6 
2.10 
O.X 
9.10 
9.06 
6.x 
6.x 
1.06 
340 
1.90 
0,76 
2.80 
8.96 
1.80 
440 
8.76 
2.x 
2.76 
2.35 
1.05 
1.98 
1.16 

1.x 

1,10 
1.x 
1.06 
1.96 
0.26 
0.25 
D.n 
0J6 
O.X 
0.70 
0.75 
2.20 
2.76 
l.X 
2.36 
IJO 
1.06 
2JS 
2.85 
2,15 
6.10 
3J0 
3.10 
1 JO 
5,X 
4,70 
4.70 
6.10 
1.06 
1,10 
225 
4.9$ 
£95 
0.75 
1.65 
1.10 
1.20 
0.75 
0.18 
0.76 
0.76 
0.19 
£36 
£10 
240 
6.M 
9.20 
9,20 
5.86 
5.x 
2JS 
8.00 
9.x 



Our Policy: 

■ Mininuni Oidtr 12600 ■ Al Pi/ti FidiHy Prim 

• W* Acoiipt HC/V)h - ALOniKi Slini^ Vl> UPS Qmvnd 

■ PIhh Add tSOO^MuiAg On All Ontn 

• NJ. O w M tn tt PlwfMd «W3<)H Tu > No CaO.'t 



RE-SHOPPER 3 



NEW AFFORDABLE - PRECISION TEST EQUIPMENT 



E.T. Tech., Inc. - Pivision of Empire Telecommunication Inc. 



I' 



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SIGNAL SYNTHESIZERS I SYNTHESIZER PULSE GENERATOR 



PGS-33 

$1355 

.100000 Hz, - 

PGS-33 ^ '*^^- 

Provides digital pulse train synttiesis witti 
six digit resolution. Cortrol of single and dual 
pulse delay and duration. Multi-modes in- 
cluding burst pulse train and variable duty 
cyle. Output to 20 Vp-p with 50 ohm im- 
pedance. D.C. offset witti TTL. 



SG-100 

$685 

.1000000 Hz. - 
SG-100 ^^-^^^^ ^^'- 

Six Digit resolution, .005% accuracy low 
distortion sine wave, output and adjustable 
to 20 Vp-p with 50 ohm output impedance 
and TTL. GPIB Option. 
SG-102 - $955 - Dual signal independent out- 
put or phase locked to one of 16 phases. 



SYNTHESIZER 
FUNCTION GENERATOR 



CLOCK SIGNAL 
SYNTHESIZER 



; 



1 SFG-33 

$1275 

,100000 Hz. ■ 
SFG-330 32.9999 MHz. 

Wavelbrnns are provided with six digit resolution, 
,005% crystal accuracy. Waveforms are sine, 
triangle, square, and rising and falling ramps, with 
dc offset and 20 Vp-p 50 ohm output over 80 dB 
range and TTL. 

SFG-330 - $17B9 - Keyboard and GPIB entry dBv and 
recall features. Options: 66 MHz. and dual Quad output. 






CSS-33 

$1095 

100000 Hi. ■ 
65.9999 MHz. 



CSS-33 



Clock signals have six digit frequency 
resolution, cryystal stability and .006% accu- 
racy. Squarewave output .002 to 20.0 Vp-p 
v^ith 50 ohm output impedance and TTL, 



DUAL SIGNAL & 
PHASE SYNTHESIS 



SG-112 $1350 99.999 KHz. 

Dual signal low distortion digital syn- 
thesis. Independent or locked signals. 
Locked signal phase resolution to .01 
degrees. 

PM-100 $855 

Measures test signal phase to .01 
degrees as compared to reference 
from 10 Hz. to 2 MHz. 



SIGNAL DIGITIZER & SCOPE 
MEMORY WAVEFORM GENERATOR 



SD-200 $795 

Signal digitizer captures signal transient 
for scope display. Adjustable sampling with 
200 nsec. maximum, stores 8 Kilo-byte with 
5% amplitude resolution. Pretrigger display 
enables analog scope to operate as a 
storage scope. 

SD-240 $1395 

Waveform Generator captures signals 
and allows for signal data entry with a iigtit 
pen. 



E.T.TccK,inc 



To order or for more information call or write: 



125 South Van Brunt Street, Englewood, N.j. 07631 
Phone 201 569-3339 Fax 201 569-5838 




Nffwlnl5lliflenMveragir.gAlgoriErim Pf[>DJam5&4AmtGi5ed.,?S6Jrttmin.,1 Meg(27D10rQl1}ini2m]r[.45&K, 



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4535 Orange Gn>ve Ave. * SiCf ameiiio. CA 9584 1 ^^ ^ 

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C.O.D. 



Call for more inform ation 

(916)924-8037 

■ F=AX 1916) 97Z-996Q 



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(713) 784-0140 • FAX: (713) 784-9740 

Wee locations in Texas..,.Come visit our retail stores! 



ELENCO 



ELENCO 



HITACHI 



OSCILLOSCOPES 



B+K PRECISION 





HITACHI 

Model V-212 
20MHz Dual Trace 



IM 



$399 



other Models 



Model MO-1251 
20 MHz Dual Trace 

Compontent Tester 



Model 2120 
20MHz Dual Trace 



V-522 - SOMHI. DT 

V-S23 - SOUhz, DT, Delayed Sweep 

V-S2S - SOMHi. DT ] 

V-660 - eoHz, DT 



$355 



$389 



V-6S5 - 60MHJ, DT, w/cursor 
V-1060 - 100MHz, DT I 



V-1065 - 1O0MH/, DT, w/cursor 
V-1085 - 100MHz, QT. w/cjrsor 

V-110dA- 100MHz, QT 

V-11 SO - 1 SOMHI. QT 



MO-1252 ■ 35-50MHZ, Dual Trace, 
Oslaysd Trigger 



_$475 



Digital Storage Scopes 



P-1 Scope Prob« - 65MHz, XI XI $13.95 

p.2 Scope Probe ■ lOOMHz. XI XI $22.95 



212S - 20MHz, DT, Delayed Swasp, Compon- 
tent Tester ^$479 

1541 -40MHz, DT $650 

2160 -60MHz,DT,D8layed Sweep $899 



VC-6023 ■ 
VC-6024 ■ 
VC-602S ■ 
VC-B045 ■ 
VC-6145 ■ 



20MHz, 20MS/S 

50MHz, 20MS/S __ 

SOMHz, 20MS/3 

100MHz, 40MS/S_ 
100MHz, 100MS/S 



_$84S 
_S930 
_S975 
_S 1,050 
_S 1,290 
$1,370 
$1.6S0 
51,950 
$2,200 
_$2,67S 

_$ 1,695 
$1,950 
$2,195 
S2,885 
$4,595 



All scQpes Include probes, schematics, operators manual, and 3 yearwanranty on parts & labor. Many accessories available for all scopes. Call or write for coniplete 
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ELENCO TEST EQUIPMENT 



Digital Triple Power Supply 



XP-765 
$245 




Fully regulated. Short circuit protsctsd *fth 
2 cuirenl limit controls, 3 sajiafalB supplies 

XP-660 With Analog Meters $175 



GF- 8016 Fun ction Generator 

^wttt) Freq. Counter 

$245 

Sine, S<)uara, Triangle 
Pulse, Ramp, .210 2MKz 
Freq Countif .1 - lOMHi 






S^ 



J 



GF-801S wlltiout Freq. Meter $179 



flSBH 




Multimeter wift\ 

Copacrtance and 

T(onji$tor Tester 

$49 CM-1500A 

Reads Volts. Ohms 

Current, Capacitor, 

Transistors and 

Diodas / with case 



Digital Copocrlance 

.^ . Meter 

CM-1550 

$55 

9 Ranges 

.1pf-20,l»(Iufd 

.5% basic accy 

Zero dr w/ case 




Quad Power Supply 




$55 

2-20V @ 2A 

12V @1A 

5V@3A 

-5V @ .EA 



Fuity regulated and slwrl circuit prelected 



Wide Band Signal Generators 

jSG-9000 $125 

RF FrKi 100K-<50MHz 

AM Modulation of 1 KHz 

Variable RF output 



SG-9S00 wllti Digital Display 
ind 1 SOMHz tjullt-ln Freq Cir $24S 




Digital LCR Meter 

LC-1801 

$120 

Measurfls: 
Coil* 1UH.200H 
Caps .1pt-20Dut 
__ Res .01-20H 

eaee 




Digital Multimeter 
^^ M-IDOO 

$24.95 

19 Ranges 

DCV-tOOO 

ACV-750 

DCA-10A 

Res-2Ma 

Diode chedi 






Triple Power Supply 



XP-620 

Assembled $60 
Kit $40 

2t0tSV91A, 

-2to-15V@1A 

(or 4 to 30V @t A] 

and 5V @ 3A 

Contains all the desired leatures tor doing eiperimsnts. 
Features slion circuit pfotedlon, all supplies 







Four- Function Frequency Counters 

F-IOO 120MH 
$175 

F-1000 1.ZGH 
$255 

Frequency, Period, Totalize, 

SeK Ctieck witli High Stabilized CryslaJ Oven 

Osoillator. 8 digK lED display 





10 Function 

Multimeter 

CM-365 

$59.95 

AC + 0C Voltage 1 Amps 

Resistant^ to 2000Mn 

Diode, Logic, i Trans lest 

Capadtanca to 200uF 

Frequency Counter 



AM/FM Radio Kit 




AM/FM 108 $24.95 

Manual teaches AM i FM 

Theory In easy to 

unde island language 

Many more kits available 



OMNITRON 



.dAve. BIDR 7-?A 
. NJ 07642 . ' 



UPS Shipping: Continental USA 5% (MAX FRT S20> 
Money Otder, Ctiecks Accepted 
Sctiool Puictiose Orders NET 30 

Sorry no CODs 

Aad 5% !or credit card 

too Poge ColQlog S3 CFRSE wiMi ordf " 



201-703-9800 



201-703-9804 (FAX) 



DIGITAL METERS 



NEW 




DMM 2360 129.95 

DSIM + LCR Meter 
Most Versatile DMM 

• Inductance: 1nH-40H 

• Capacitance: 1 pF - 40 nF 

• Temperature: 40 ■ 302°F 

• Frequency: 1 Hz • 4MHz 

• Logic test: 20MKz 

• Diode test 

• Continuity beeper 

• Vott, current, ohm 

• 3999 count display 

• Peak hoid 

• Auto power off 



DMM 135 $79.95 

MEASUEE T^SPEXATOHE 

• 0<'.1400°F 

-ac-Tsox 

.r.l" resolu- 
tion 

• C:1pF-20nF 

• ,in-2oooMn 

• Voil, current, 
continuity 

'* Diode, hFE 
tests 

• Type K ther- 
moco<jpte In- 
cluded 

DMM 5365 $79.95 

• Frequency 
1 Hz -MO KHz 

• Logic test 20 
MHz 

• C:1pF-20^F 

• .in -2000 MO 

• Volt, current, 
continuity 

• Diode, hFE 
tests 

J«i* Compact size 



DMM 175A $94.95 

Dim MEASURES 20 MHz 




mum 



^ -.'<'"• 'y- 



f 




I • Frequency 
1 Hz - 20 
MHz 

Logic test 
20 MHz 

C: IpF - 

ZOpF 

.in - 20DD 
MQ 

• Volt, cur- 
rent, con- 
tinuity 

* LED, diode, 
hFE tests 



LCR Meter 

$119.95 

• inductance: 
1nH-2O0H 

• Capeeitance: 
.1pF-200nF 

• Resistance: 
.01ii-20Mn 





JVAME BRAND QUALnY SI. REUABIUTY 

15 DAY MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 

ONE YEAR REPLACEMENT WARRANTY 

PROMPT DEUVERY SI SERVICE 

ALFA ELECTRONICS 

P.O. BOX 8089, PRINCETON, NJ 08543 

(800) 526'ALFA 

FAX: (609) 275-9536 



TECHNICAL SCHOOL CLOSED! 



S«lltng Iwndrtdt of HEATH Co. ttft inil training Kiiiipmint at up ts M% oH llMir ciukig 
pricit. U« Htalli ciliiog tor dtscrljgtloii. Condition: nw to dlght^ uwd, untsrtiinattly 
muvywnhouttnantiib. All prol*ssk]nillrirlrHj(t<Et»d, or In original Mt torn as not*d. FInt 
corrMjilrtlMrved. ChKk or major cradltcinjt. Son^noCODoropineceountt. Add (4.50 
tat-MillIng and Handling 



SKI 01 12 VDC4A Pdov Sicily 3»X 

t£7l FurElonQKWdci mX 

):74 2Wl2 Sml^IMm GwHitar 135^00 

tS77 fvht GenaiiM HT.n 

zzx D>puc>(i«teH9iiMH tiJLtn 

ZJSOK HmdHidlJDMtEHMHI tUD 

ZiZ)M HndtaMlJOgltaMMWiM Ssio 

tnw MnUnJvanilCaudtir Kloa 

jn?A Fl»g.RV,Pt»niSi«jlf teilW 

Vi» TiJFdiOutxJtDC&ffily t»iU 

ltt7 DKKliRwliinetBn 49J0 

3)20 SamiomduckirCliKiw MJO 

CtUA L«erT(airw,Wr*l XSM 

«a>K Itmliiiai.n ■ \iiJ10 

«9S DuWTrK«»HH[OKila<iEf» il&Vi 

«3e DialTriMKMHtOulaoEfit SUM 

S17 Ba«gry(^«MV.O.M. J9j0 

sm VminfgbiVdtmttr MJO 

HCASCajMinCwCeniKlaUictoila MJO 

PKWtOE Muu 1(t1 Conbe F^ota ^ 2L50 

HMTHfgUeinOW^I SY^TFtHf 

10OO AnioB/OgiUCMTiiinir 21500 

3300 Plujin bMt Boad Tivhc UJ» 

3400 KercprootttfirTriRHr l&ioO 

MOOC PoiliMC«yCHtiaM.T. ItJX 

iiCT Tniw ABwor BkIi Pack es.W 

3600 *nrf<aE<liN]ifiii^Tr^)B ea» 

3700 tMt/TKtnqiMTnhv 79 <0 

eOl OlgiWEipvtowitMiidU* 7750 

ET1C0 MaooonnjIirTrHW 3ftS.C0 

ZVM133 Timiid b Ahwi 2li.n 

Btmvx Duds.rHACiiH iMm 

iMscpiMmoua 

m T4PnlaUtE)itaTirminal M^ 

HFtlK H'PSciwiMoCiluklofMiniit Ee^ 

S4M HmM Padurd Lsgtc ftoba 1 56.00 

«4«A Ha«(MtPtdi>dLcn:PUMt aO.CC 

M7A HmM Pukird CtirMTrica 37e(C 

54«A HwMPadiatdlogisC^ 192.CO 

w:ZA AI4inC«rrCia> tlfcCO 

SP100 Satid-PaiM CawM*. 1 10VAC fS.OO 



"Esm 






WBIZ 



Ni]t*:T>wvn44Mtcfwnp0Mnlpar1tusu4fy9U{:i^«d 
wih nvBw^ H* net aviMUa ■ ^ ' 



314aA 
E4S(yi 
ECItOt 
EE10M 

Ecesoi 

EElOt 

eEio2 

EE103 
EE104 

EEioe 

EE110 

EEJJOtA 

EEBoea 



CoKcpto o{ Bvctonk* Covi* 
Flw l^ica Uarmg Count 
Piws Cirail DHi^i Con* 
DbU OicuI Mgn CocmZud. 
LjO EnHrriHnk D9U Tvdrquaa 
HSCfM Mnn 



Ac^FltnCant 

X.nmiitCaalt 

f^itt* Lddud Lopa Count 

OpteEltctai(c(C«int 

UHT TK^Mlogtit Cewat 

Digiy T«c4nqMa Count, 2 vd. 

Alft^d WqCpfOOtt M * COLHtv 2 w< 50^ 
EglKATrOWAtflOOIfS 



2U0 
K.SO 
2U0 

t»^ 
2gio 

«£0 



ThlH boete IT* bnnd rwv & r^tMnla invui DW pub- 
Edwthtoieta. Altwdbowdaxo^itflf rwbd. 

LabEip«ftrMnliD>^TMh(«e| PUR 

TnCooJiaaek.[jneialir(io<(|,Sim« IlK 

AaHcnfcfylirMiuaaaPioviniffoia.lnM PtJR 

ElKMty 1 -7,1iHf, Hiyiln tHK) 

D«HnllMli>gUMvUi<wt:*ilr,Hii.P4M PUR 

FinteD«4iiili[!i|AdBK/tir^P4U PUR 

CttKit* h>6 to En oo—Vio Ectnmiea IZiO 

ln*i«IMVM«<t<n.Ci)wvllBrot tC.SO 

^ ^KKifsimmwisu. 

QsrbBuioElSmarsirH 10W 

SoXwanPiiiMlqr.Umlaiigit 10.S0 

li*«li>UnlSr*Rii,BMr«SliE(l.|KlO «.» 

QUUB««cnE«,TelMni2n)Ei|>o(t MS 

AHihnn»GuidttoPTielc^8Klrtiiic«{io^ 3.75 

nUtd Bk*<iibi tin EipviiMnll ix 

BOOKS BYUEnail 

E;^i«ini«i«in ElMwitMaOtJa. tSO 

DigUEip«<innli-TRuUaitoiit,C«|KM lOJC 

EifnMnliE>**ini:C«uti,Sunltii.2iid 11J0 

PlnoiplttolElK*s<eC(aite,F1oyil.3idEi{. te.SO 

PllMUtt(ifEI«AaHCirsi*t.Fli>y(l.3rdEd ^X 

DigUFlnlnwit^RivdjRJEd. 14.50 



LcDm Tech 



1755 Osgood St.. North Andover. MA 01845 
CALL: 508/682-4936 FAX: 508/689-9484 
ORDER roa FREE: S0Q/343-14S5 ec 



NEW PRODUCTS 



continued from page 22 



Expansion from stand- 
alone data logger to com- 
plete data-logging system 
is simple and easy. As 
many as five data loggers 
(for a total of 80 channels) 
can be networked togetfier 
using the RS-422 ports at 
the rear of each unit. By 
wiring a network into a PC, 
up to 800 channels can be 
monitored. 

No programming experi- 
ence is reqiiired for set up. 
Once data is taken it can be 
sent to a printer, logged to 
a PC, or sent to one of the 
DB-2000 Series data buff- 
ers. Suggested applica- 
tions are in temperature 
monitoring and control, 
field-environment experi- 
ments,' benchtop data 
gathering, industrial-equip- 
ment monitoring, and re- 
mote data gathering. 

Prices for the expansion 
data logger range from 
$995.00 to $1295.00; the 
DDL SW applications soft- 



ware and LTN-03 Labtech 
Notebook software cost 
$495.00 and $995.00, 
respectively; and the 
JCV'W I/O module costs 
$345.00, A complete line 
of accessories, including 
cables, adapters, data buff- 
ers, battery-backup sys- 
tems, rack-mount kits, and 
driver relays, is also avail- 
able. — MetraByte 
Corp., 440 Myles Stand- 
ish Blvd., Taunton, MA 
02780; Tel. 508-880-3000. 



PRESERVATION 

PLAN ON IT 

Wrile: 

Natioiuil Trust 

foi Historic Pieservation 

Department PA 

178S Massachusetts Ave, N.W 

Washington, D.C. 20036 




» RE-SHOPPER 



fg ^-UKELVlfl 



Electronics 



INDUSTRI 
AT DISCO 



AL QUALITY 
UNT PRICES 



BREADBOARDS FOR LESS! 

Durable - Made of the highest QUALrrY 

pmSTiC - DESIGNED TO WITHSTAND THOUSANDS 
OF INSERTION CYCLES 




P rail I Kill 




Rg, 


Slock No 


A 


680093 


B 


680097 


C 


S8009S 


D 


680099 



Contact 
Points 

500 

840 

1380 

1580 



YOUR 
COST 

$ 4.25 ea 
$ 5.95 ea 
$11.75 ea 
$15.75 ea 



lililsSliU 



The Professionals ' Choice 



with ZOMHl FREQUENCY COUNTER excellent tor 
COMPUTER TV, VCR REPAIR and ENGItiEEmNG. 



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D LOGIC TEST 

■ DIODE CHECK 

D CONTINUFTY TESTER 

■ S FREQUENCY RANGES 
D TRANSISTOR hFE TEST 

■ 5 CAPACITANCE RANGES 
D LED TEST VERIFY QOOOfflAD 
M 20 MHz FHEO couwTEH 
n AC / DC VOLTAGE MUSES 

■ AC / DC CURRENT UHOES 

CASE - Yalkiw. Durable. 
BackSmrvd 



WIRE JUMPER KIT 

Stock No. Description Polnis YOUR COST 

330290 350PieceSQ! S 7.75 63 130 DAY MONEY BACK GUARANTEE! 



rroi 



e 



->^ 









PROTECTIVE CARRYING CASE 
Stock No. 990094 $9.95 ea 



'69 



95 



StKKNS. 090092 



K.LS. SYSTEMS 

Kelvin Interface Systems 




NEW HARDWARfi 
NEW SOFTWARE 

USEP 

FRIENDLY 



199 



EDOCATBHAL 
AlCTrVITY 

GET 5 COMPLETE 

CLASSflOOM SETUPS 

FOB UNDER $1000 



robotic control system 

AVAILABLE tor IBM or APPLE 

SYSTEM mCLUDES: 
m RoboUc Ann ■ K.I.S. lnwrf*e« 

■ iJoyslicks 

■ Power Supply 

■ Sotlwate 



Defflonttratlon 
VMeo 



UPGRADABLE - adds the ABiurTTO cwhthoi. 

AN ADOmOfUL 4 OC MOTORS UP TO 1 AMP EACH FOR 

PROBLEM SOL VINO *CnvmtS SUCH AS CONVETOBS, 

ELEVATORS. PLOTTERS i ROBOTIC CARS. 



KELVIN 100 
95 



23 



stock No. 
990087 

AC/OC VOLTAGE 

OC CUBHENT 

RESISTANCE 

DIODE TEST 

BATTtRV TEST 

LOW BATTERY Warning 

ACCURACY 4l-aiV. 



KELVIN 150 



$ 



29 



stock No. 
990090 

ACIDC VOLTAGE 

DC CURRENT 

RES)ST*NCE 

DIODE 4 BATTERY TEST 

LOW BATTERY Wtmltig 

ACCURACY t/ 0.5% 

COf/TINUITY TEST 
TRANSISTOR CHECK 



95 



INDUSTRIAL 
QUALITY 



nnm 




YOU CANT 
KELVIN 200 IGO WRONG! 



39 



95 



stock No. 
990091 

ACJOC VOLTAOE 
AC'OC CUHREHT 
RESISTANCE DIODE TEST 
LOW BATTERY Wimlng 
ACCURACY v- 5% 
COKTINUITY TESTIBUZZEH 
TTtAliSJSTOH CHECKER 
CAPACITANCE CHECKEU 



30 DAY 
MONEY BACK 
GUARANTEE! 



CARRYING CASE 

Sladi No. 990093 
M.95 «e 



TIMER - LM55S 
Stock No. 600021 



20 Qf 



ea. (in too* Q^) 



ffl] 



L.E.D. RED (inlOO+Qty) 
stock No. 260020 



6g 




Transistors {inioo+ oiw 
2N2222 ISgea. 
PN2222 .OSpTea. 



"^ 



Project BUZZER 

6-9V DC, 80 dB 
Stock No. 680069 

$1.59 ea $1 .39/lOt ea. 



11 



9V Battery Snap & Holder 
Snap .15 ea. .10ea/ioo+ 
Holder .20 ea .IOea/1004 



LAPEL MICROPHONE 
Stock No. 850306 
YOUR COST $2.95 ea 

CADMIUM SELENIDE 

PHOTOCELL 

4$0 Ohms e* 2 IL, C rmfiimutri iiart<. rasrstincfl 225 uhms 
Maa: votoofl 1 70V peak. P^aks al 69M angstroms. ^^ 

No. 26001 7 YOUR COST $ .99 ea. 





SULPHIDE 
PHOTOCELL 

1,SK Ohrni © 2 ft., C minimum daifc restslsncs 75 ohm| 
M«x voltia* 17CiV aeak. Poaks at 5500 origslrcirns. 

No. 26001 8 YOUR COST $ .99 ea 



SUB-MINIATURE 

MOMENTARY 
PUSH SWITCH 

S4l«nl ^aion red piroh button molded J>{3u5Kig. 

ReouKW IM" panftl h&te. Ovftfall Jpnolh incl^jding solder luns « 1" 

RltKl tISVAC, 1 AMF>, 

Stsc*No. Color TOUR COST ItJOt 

990002 Red 
DC MOTOR 

1 .5 to 6VDC 

S»IK» No, YOUR COST Mt. 

85221 1 $ .50 ea $ .45 ea 



$.35ea $ .28 ea 



,-iB- 



T 



QUIPMENT 




SOLDE 
WELLER 
MARKSMAN 
SOLDERING GUN 

Model SP23 

Fealtiorweighl 1-3/4 OJ,. S5 watts (or PC vrertt. Ideal for 
reaching Inio those hard to get spots. ReplaceatHe tip. 
Stock No. YOUR COST 6+ ^ 

810002 $8.55 ea S7.95ea 
SOLDERING 
IRON HOLDER 
Model PH60 

SDldering stand with ba$B. sponoe. 

For WidP, WPZ5P. WP40P, and ironi wilh Blrrol diam»t»tj 

up to 1V32'. 




Slock No. Deacrlptlon 

810041 PH60Stand 

810042 Replacemenl 
Sponge 



YOUR COST 
$13,78 ea 



6+ 
$13.09 ea 



$ 1.89 ea $ 1.80 ea 



KESTER SOLDER 



RESIN CORE SOLDERS 1 LB. ROLL 

Mon-Corro5,vo Flux Heain Core 
Slock No. Inch Ola, QA. 

580010 1/S4" .025 £3 
5B0005 1/32" .031 21 
580001 1/16" .062 16 

580011 3/32- .093 13 



64/37 
60/40 
60/40 

60/60 



YOUR COST 
$11.96 ea 
$9.35 ea 
$8.95 ea 
J11.75B8 



VtfE STOCK 
A COMPLETE LINE OF FUSES 

FAST ACTING - SLO-BLO TYPE - PIGTAIL 



3AG FUSE BLOCK 



phmolK. 1/2* 
1 71V tong. ForlM" X t 1/4" 
leng hd«L SoUtr lua conn«ctionB 
Stock No. YOUR COST 

380030 $ .45 ea 



FUSE MOUNTING 
BLOCK 

Dual hjH blocks 1^4'x1' long. Slack 
tfik*lilB base, Fery4'x1 IM'tuw 
Mounting centers S/S' MS.Etnun]. 
Stock No. YOUR CC«T 

380010 $ .62 ea 



FUSE POST 
TYPE HKP 

BaywetMe. 2n5T.lor1M"nri«' 

fuses, 1 S Ampere 2SCV, Panel nol« 
slJ9 IJS- (12.7mni). CcimBl»to witn 
mourtling nut 
Slock No. 



YOUR COST 

380001 $ .90 ea 




KELVIN BRAND 
HI-SPEED, HI-QUALITY 
PRINTED CIRCUIT ETCHANT 

fteady-to-use MJuPon of feme cfiloride 

prinred ojcurl elcnant In ptaifSc aywajrtfrr. 

Stock No. SPECIAL BUY 

440017 4 6.25 l>«'>^'°" 

KELVIN BRAND 

HI-SPEED DRY 

PRINTED CIRCUIT ETCHANT 

Cioaji, Birffl. •commica]. iixMi^ni99 St>vH iAo, 
4 lb*, wtd mtkit a otilora of focorrwiemiod 

stock No. YOUR COST NEW PRICE 
440026 $8.40 ea $ 7.00/ 41b bag 

KELVIN BRAND COPPER CLAD BOARD 

NEMA orade FR-2 IrIG* mick. unpunched dad wi ons txl*. 
StodllMo. SiM YOUR COST 

440002 4 1/2" X 6" $1 .55 ea 

440003 5" X 7* $2.40 ea 
440015 8 1/2x12 1/2" $4.908a 

ETCH RESIST INK PENS 




BlddiL leh| kip pgn lor rmfong racitl drcuJla tSitfCiiy on PC bovtlS- 

Cbd t» rsrnqved wrth PC Boaro Sti1fMiri[j Sotuttor. 

Stock No. Mod*l Description Y0URC03T 

440115 22-220 Draws 1/32" wide $1,48ea 

440 11 6 22-222 Draws 1 /64'' wide $ 1 , 85 ea 



■s: KEZ. WAL 



Electronics 



7 rairchtid Ave. Plainvlaw, NY 1180:1 



Call: 1 (800)645-9212 

1 (516) 349-7620 (cirIl^e'^r'^I^'^s^e 
FAX: 1 (516)349-7830 ^*''° 



RE-SHOPPER 



itrs 



ELECTRONIC 
CLEARING 
HOUSE, INC. 



P.O. BOX 2006 • OLDSMAR, FLORIDA 34677 

813-855-4740 • FAX 813-855-6326 



WEATHERPROOF 8 OHM 
SPEAKER 

Sze 3"x3"x2'' can be rnounted 

Hardware irxduded 

4.5' Cord 3.5mrji Plug 



#SPK305 



•^~- $9.95 



NEW riEM - VOLT PEN 

Determines pmsenoe oF 
AC vcrftage through insul- 
ated wires. Contact with 
bare wire not required. 
t.ocates live wires in junc- 
tion boxes, blown fuses, 
br^ks in insulated wire & 
cable, defective circuit 
bteakers, defective in-line 
circtiita, elc. 

♦TKS10 1-4 $17.95 
5+ $15.95 



IC'S 
MEMORY CHIP/D'RAM 
• SOCKET PULLS 

64K X 1 — 1 50 NS 
#IC64 $1.75 

256K X 1 - 1 50 NS 
#IC25 $2.50 



AXUU. EUCTROLYTTC KFT 

50 PIECES 
5 each of tlie followir>g values: 



1 UF 1 SOV 

3UF 1 SOV 

2UF 350V 

2,2UF 250V 

33ilF 260V 

#AE50 



6LIF 150V 

10UF 100V 

20UF 100V 

1 50UF 1 SOV 

220UF 100V 

$9.50 



ZENER DIODE KIT 

100 PIECES 
5 each of the following values 
3.6V 6-8V 18V 36V 



35V 
4.7V 
5.6V, 
6.2V 

#W2D20 



a2V 

a IV 

12V 
16V 



20V 39V 

27V 43V 

30V 47V 

33V S6V 



ALL1 WATT 



$15,00 



LED'S 

T t 3/4 Clear Lens; Light as Red 



#l£D25 Bag of 25 $2.50 



ZENER DIODE KIT 

1 50 PIECES 
5 each of the fottcwing values 

2.4V s.av a.Tv tev asv 

2.7V e.OV 9.1V 17V 2TV 

3.OT 6.ZV 10V 18V asv 
asv B^v 12V tav aov 

3.9V 7.5V 13V 20V 33V 

4.7V 8.2V 15V 22V 56V 

ALL 500 MW 

*MZD30 $22.50 



MONOLYTHIC KFT 

lOOPiECES 

5 each of the following ^lues 

10PF 470PF .0O47UF 0.47UF 

33PF 680PF .0068UF .1UF 

68PF 1000PF .01 UF .Z2UF 

100PF 0OZ2UF .016UF .33UF 

eeOPF .0O33UF .OZ^UF .47UF 

ALL MINIMUM 50V 

RANGES 5-10-20* 

#MK20 $10.00 



3 AMP RECTIHER KIT 

24 PIECES 
3 each of Ibe fottowing values: 

5400 5401 5402 5403 

5404 5405 5406 5407 

#FIFIK24 $2.50 



CERAMK: DISC KIT 

105 PIECES 

15 each of the foUowlpig most 

popular values: 

(All 1 KV| (Some Short Leads) 

5PF 26PF 350PF 910PF 

-OOtSPF ,oaj9PF .01PF 

#CD105 $5.00 



RESISTOR Knr 

200 PIECES 

1 S 2 WATT 5 & 10^ 

10 each of 20 assorted v^ues 

#REK200 $2.00 



CAPACITOR KIT 

100 PIECES 

Radial Mytar - All 100V 10% 

1 each of the follcwfng values: 

.0015 .0058 033 .068 .15 

.0022 .01 .047 .1 .47 

#CPK15 $12.00 



TRANSISTOR KTT 

PNP NPN 
5 each of the following values: 



2N4400 
2N440a 



2rvH401 
2NS401 



#TflK20 



$2.50 



DEALER INQUIRIES WELCOME. 
CALL OR WRITE FOR A COPY OF OUR FREE FLYER. 
PRICES DO NOT INCLUDE SHIPPING- 
FLORIDA RESIDENTS ADD B<¥o SALES TAX. 
MINIMUM ORDER S10.00 ~ COD {CASH ONLY) 
SHIPPING AND HANDUNG ADD S3. 7 S 



CAMCORDER 
REPUCEMENT BAHERIES 
FROM THE BAHERY STORE 

• Low Cost AllQWt Extra Spare Battsrlet 

• Buy Dlrict From Th« Bittiry Manuftcturar 

• Ellmlnata "M>iinry" Problim 

• Extanded Run Tims MixMi AvailaUa 

• 6 Month Warranty 

• Other Battery Types Available 

• Overnight Shipment by UPS 

8mm NP-22 Sony (27.00 

NP-55/77 Sony $31.00 

E-77X Canon $46.00 

VP-BP81 Olympus/Nikon $41,00 

BP80 Panasonic $34.00 

CB-120 RCA/Hitachi $49.00 

NP-009 RCA/Pentax $49,00 

BP-96FL RCA/Hitachi $49.00 

VHS-C BN-V6GU JVC/Zenith $31.00 

VMP-51 RCA/Hitachi $49,00 

'Add $4.00 shipping & handling per batteiy 

BittBrIsc an our only butlnoss, The triie vatue o1 any battery 
system is determined by service, performance and dependaWlity. 
Make your choice Periphex. Nobody has a better battery or offers 
a better vatue. 

itHIH?RlPI10Xlnc. 

149 Palmer Road . Southbury, CT 064^8 

{BOq 8344132 . ftl CT (21^ Z64-3S85 

^^ FAX: [203 2e2-aiK3 



VHS 




COMPUTER DISK SERVICE 



SPECIALIZED DRIVE REPAIR 



EAGATe5'- 



ST 238 



ST 225 



W>N1SCB>BE6;;'_ 



3435,3^38 



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M,N>SCR>B£3v. 

a425. 8438 

$120° 

SEAGATE ST 251 



Special 
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FOR SALE 

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380mb SCSI r 6ms 
M'NISCR,BE9380S 



* 1.000.00 



CALL FOR PRICE 



• Class 100 clean room 

• Servowriting capabilities (Call for prices] 

• Volume discount 

• 1 20 day warranty on all repairs 

• 7-10 day turn around time 

• 24 hour turn around - ADD 30% 

• Ask about our data recovery (Call for quote) 



COMPUTER DISK SERVICE 

3537 OLD CONEJO ROAD, Suite #115 

NEWBURY PARK. CA 91320 



PH (806)499-6356 
FAX (806) 499-0346 



\0 HE-SHOPPER 



SPECIALS 



LIMITED QUANTITIES 



CABLE CONVERTERS 



SIGMA 



SIGMA 550-86 CHANNEL *99.95 



EACH 



TOP CHANNEL ROLLOVER, 
LAST CHANNEL MEMORY, 
PARENTAL LOCKOUT, 
FAVORTTE CHANNEL, SURGE 
PROTECTION, 4 db AMP, 
DECODER COMPATIBLE, 
1 YEAR WARRANTY. 



y7y*y5 each slot 

$75.00 EACH 10 LOT 
$67 .SO EACH 20 LOT 
$05.0U EACH 50 LOT 



COMING SOON 'NORTH COAST' CONVERTERS 

TOP OF THE LINE 



SAN JOSE SPECIAL! 
SCIENTIFIC ATLANTA 6700 A/B *99.95 

$7" ."5 EACH SLOT 
$75*00 EACH 10IX)T 



EACH 



$69 .95 EACH 20 LOT 
$65 .00 EACH 50 LOT 



54 CHANNEL A/B TWINLESfE, 
10 CHANNEL RECALL, 
CHANNEL 3 OUTPUT, 
ZENITH COMPATIBLE 



UNITED ELECTRONIC SUPPLY 

P.O. BOX 1206, ELGIN, IL 60121 

(708) 697-0600 



RE-SHOPPER i 



BATTERIES 



Replacements (All New — Made in the U.S.A.) 



CAMCORDER 

(batteries) 



JVC 
GR-C series 8i95 

PANASONIC 

PVBP80 (12V @ 2.3anips) mM 

LCS2012-VBNC 135^5 

LCS2012.BVBN ..mM 

RCAfHtTACKI 

FuiisteVHS mss 

VH&C ....mM 

SONY 

NP22 J32.95 

NP55 $32.95 




COMMUNICATIONS 

(complete battery packs and Inserts) 



ICOM 
PB.2 (SOOmah i, 7,2V)- (33. 

PB-5 ISOOmah ,,■ 7.2V) ,S44. 

'7(S)(I2M(nah .n3.2Vl .163. 

'8(S)(1200riah< 9,6V| S59. 

'base charge only, one Inch longer 

KENWOOD 

KNB-1 ISMmati -s 10.8V) S39. 

KNB.4 (2!00fflah ft ?.2V| 165, 

P8.1 jllMmahiS 12V) S61. 

YAESU 

FNB.2l50Qniah,s11V) S20. 

"FNB-10(eOOmah'&7,2V) . S30. 

"FNBKHSIIlOOOmah t7,ZV) .. S45. 

FNB-12(500rrahei2V) 144 

■*FNB-12|S|(600niahJl2V) S49. 

"same size case as FN B'12 



SPECIALS!!! 



CELLULAR BATTERIES 

AMD ELIMINATORS 

MOTOROLA 

PANASONIC 

MITSUBISHI 

OKI 



NEC 

N OVATE L 

NOKIA-MOBIRA 

DIAMDNDTEL 

TECHMQPHONE 

MOTOROLA-FLIP PHONE 

SERIES 

AOUIOUOX 



CORDLESS PHONE 

(batterjesi 



ATT 

4110,4310,5210,5310 ,.*9.00 

Freedom 400 (8.00 

Nomad 200,250, 400 (8,00 

COBRA 

CP-100, 200, 300, 400, series $8.80 

CP-454S lo CP475S series 19.00 

PANASONIC 

KX-T3805, PQP-25F30tt $11.00 

KX'Series most models. $ 8.00 

SONY 

SSP-flO $9.00 

UNIDEN 

EX-series most models .$ $,00 

XE-series $9.00 



MasterCfird and Vtsa 
cards accepted NYS 
residentB addS' i^'c 
^iiiles tak Add S3 50 
lof postag^handljng. 



(800) 442-4275 



Prices subject Iq chiing'e vyilhout nohcG | 

DEALERS WANTED (QUANTITY DISCOUNTS) 

BA TTER Y-TECH mC. 

28-25 215thi PLACE, BAYSIDE, NEW YORK 11360 
IN NEW YORK (718)631-4275 ■ FAX: (718) 461-1978 



CIRCLE 347 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



* 11 voy don E 4n " '%* 'or il 

- Cuk^ambJllfiv pji£h,k 
• Hiqh cjipaciEf p^ckt 

> NiCk«l CadmiLfin Ctlll 

- Ltlhium 

TELEX; 510G0 16795 



MS-DOS EPROM 

PROGRAMMING SYSTEM 
NEEDS NO INTERNAL CARD 



EPROMS 

270S(5«upply) 

275S.2716 
27016,2516 
2532*, 2564" 
68764* ,6 876S* 
2732, 2732 A 
27C32, 2764 
2764 A, 27C64 
27128, 271 28 A 
27C123, 27236 
27C256. 27512 
27C512,27C010* 
2701 0',27C1 001' 




2e64A, 2825S* 

8748', 8748H* 
8749*, 8749H* 
87S1',e7C51* 
8752*, 8744H' 

'Socket Adapter 
Required 

(OtagnuTis InclixM^) 



CONNECTS TO YOUR SYSTEM'S 

PARALLEL PRINTER INTERFACE 

-A FUU- FEATUflED, EASV-TO-USE SYSTEM WORKS WitH AMY DESKTOP OS LAPTOP MACHtNE 
' ADAPTIVE, HCOH^EPEED ALGORITMU MIHIIWZE3 PROGRAMMJHG TMJE^ AND IMSUHES VALID DATA 
• SYSTEM PROGRAMS ALL STANDARD 0€ViC£S OR EOUrVALEHTS FROM AHY MANUFACTUnEn 
< ALL SVSTEU COUPCHEKT9 FIT NEATLY INTO CASE FOR TRAVEL OR STORAGE 

SYSTEM SOFTWARE COMMANDS 



. PROGRAM EPROM(S) 
FROM DISK FILE 

. READ DISK FILE INTO 
BUFFER 

. READ EPROM(S) INTO 
BUFFER 



SAVE EPFIOM(S) OH 
BUFFER TO DISK 
PROGRAM EPROMfS} 
FROM BUFFER 
COMPARE EPROM(S) 
WITH BUFFER 



. COPY EPROM(S) 
. VERIFY EPROM 

ERASED 
. BUFFER EDITOR 
. SELECT DEVICE TYPE 
.DEVICE CHECKSUM 



BUFFER EDITOR HAS IB BYTE LEVEL COMMANPS FOfl DETAILED OPERATIONS 

SYSTEM INCLUDES: PROGRAMMING UNIT POWER PACK, 
CONNECTING CABLE, OPERATION MANUAL L SOFTWARE 

SOFTWARE AVAILABLE ON 3 1 12" OH 5 1J4' DISK~ 
TO ORDER SEND CHECK, MONEY ORQEft, Vtf^iTE Ofl CALL: 



$239 



ANDRATECH 

P.O. BOX 222 

M1LFORD,OHIO 45150 

(513)831-9708 

CALL OR WRITE FOR UORE INFO. - ADD $5,0D FOR SHIPPING - $4,00 COD 



VISA 



MASTER 
CARD 



32 RE-SHOPPER 



CABLE TV 
"BOXES" 

Converters— Descramblers 

Remote Controls 

Accessories 

• Guaranteed Best Prices • 

• 1 Year Warranty— CO. D.'s * 

• Immediate Shipping • 

* FREE CATALOG • 

Call or Write 

TRANS-WORLD CABLE CO. 

12062 Southwest 117th Court Suite 126 

Miami, Florida 33186 

■■■■ 1-800-442-9333 /C2S^ 



MasterCard)! 



Call £or Outstanding Pricing on Tailored Computer Systems ^^ 

f. (iLWfiYS fiT B DISCOUNT 



MOTHERIOAROS • XT ■ 2ee ■ MS • 4U 

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IT lOnWi! lurto a MOt Uti 1 tlOls » BEOS i CPU 



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CONTROLLERS 

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All Drwe Typw 



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CWinCTICAflD II. t aiKB. BSOKT^OK 1 ^mbl Mnrll 94 

CBUPHCTICIWD II, CO-taH. ClflS S Dr, Nl Typej .75 

tONFWrnURD IV. i Dr, All TylKS Co-CiiEI fH Slind Alont BiKll Fros 
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WESTERN DIGITAI. >[T-GEN. CMS I HO. MfM. XT .S3 

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WESTERN DIGITAL 1(»3-MM?. 2f0 ?MD. ! 1. u™. AT IK 

WESTtRK DIGITAL 1006-MM? IFD7HD. I 1. MFM. AT tIC 

WEETEF!N DIGITAL H»3-SH?.2F0?HD. M. All, AT 1» 

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POWER SUPPUES 

150*XT. SandirdSat fflfPC.XTSystBms ...^....l-., 38 

15011 XT. UL AwilWKl 4S 

2D0* XT. Stanrlard PItysmL Size lor PC XT .... 4i 

200* XT. UL ApprovBl S! 

^76ti AI SUAdin! F^u^ Srn Im ISM AT . S4 

JJOnAT UL Aconwti M 

FLOPPT DtSK DRIVES 

TEAC3H1K. 5-1-1. FDSSBFl. BuaBiMc. (Besll . K'M 

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TfAC720i;, 3-1-3. FOJSSSF, wlft 5-1'< HI, Biegt Onl^ ... M 

TEK 1 MtHb. 3-1,'2. fD335HF, Wlin 5-1. i Kil Biege 74 

FUJITSU BBOK. 5-1.4. M.;ut A aiir:k'B<mi 63-^5 

FUJITSU I 2mil. 5-1 5. HI553K. Bit?! 73 

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TOSHIBA I.AJmll. S-I.'J. Hl)3565. w.Cll. BljU'Siegt M 

MINI MICRO 1 2mlv. 5-1.-4. MMFD-SSOK. BugcMlg Sa<nsiino 7A 

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4(M. FILL. Minl'Uem-Mlg bySamung, 3 25 HHw.j.IS 
UOkntl. MFM-RLL. MFTSUSISHI MRSJS. 5 75 HH. ^SS Vun 
2S(i» SboduTwunlHi. ^ Coil. Surlm Counted TKlmolom 
SEAGATE 

SOlllb. MFM. ST-225. 5 ?5 HH. CSmi * Dr Dirty; WiSIr . 205259 

joint. MFM. ST-12i. 9 !S HH *5 J5 Bt. A(lins28ms !35'2BO 

2(llllb. ULL. ST-225fl. 5 25 HH. TOms ' Dr On^ W.Ctrl 199.-249 

30m6, FILL, Sr-J3afl, 5 2S HH 65rTis ■ Dr. Only w'larl 21*282 

30mt). MFM, ST-13JB. 3 2S HH 1C5.25 kil, 4»l«ras lUTX 

3«m6, MFM, ST-I», 3 25 HH *S25lat. 4Dmt28m5 ,, 294'3I2- 

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-tOmll. MFM, ST-251. 5 25 HK, 4(!ms 2Iin! 315 

4«mi. MfM,SI-1S1,3!SHH*i251ci1 24ins 394 

EBmtl. RLL, ST-277H-1. 5.25 HH. 23ms (SSnibl 388 

8*nb. MfM. 57-4097. 5 25 HH. 2Sm5 585 

VIDEO DISPUkT CARDS 

MONOCHROME GRAPHICS Cjnl. W'Fir Ron. LPT1 21 

MOKOCHROMEGHAPHICSCsia. t^JJllllPin. lPT1.2or3 » 

DUAL VIDEO Cirb AHo« 2 Morutors 10 Run on t ^w^k Cud 75 



I. Xna 239 



347 



DUAL MONO-COlOd. Gijptucs drU. J in wit Cwj 

CGA Color Graphics Adaptor. Mo Prlrsu ftirl 

EvfflFK ENHANCER. 6401(350. No Pniner Fort 

EUPEd EGA DEM SOhSOO. A«10 Swil*in5 

V&A GFIAI>HiCS SOCtiBOO SUPER VGA 1024l7ea I8BII .. 
VI f ATI. K»i560 BS™ 256 
ATI OEM. 10241761 ISEil. 25SK. (VIEW PERFECt) . . 
ATI WA. OEM. KI2-11768. 18811. 2S6i;. w.'Mbim. IVP) 
VGA BOOlBOO (Oik), 15Blt 

FMBS z:*^, 

MOBILE BABY SITTER 'MVi^f- 
PorubiB WIrslBU .JSm.^ii: J> 
MohltDring Sytt«iTt 



35 

14 

. 112 

.. n 

112 

179 
205 

sad 

39 



Quality & Service to the Smart Mai) Order Shopper for over 4 Years 



7S 

.. 79 
112 
110 
130 
229 

tu 

349 
379 
349 
539 

. 495 



MONITORS 
Ail. OEM MONITORS MANUFACTURED BY SAMSUNG 

MONOCHROME 

12" yonda 12O0. JJtlK348.Am6T.-S 

12' MM OEM 1252, 7201350, AM3.. Tilt X Swml 

14- MM OEM 1457, 7!0j35O, AMB .-mi, FHI Scr. liS 

14 VOLTBON GM-1489. 720l350. AMB -WW. FrS. T-S 
14- EVERVJSION. 7^)j3S0, Amb , Fill Scrmi. T'S ... 
14 MMM OEM HM14641:. 64[(iJl». S! 001. T.S 
14 MM OEM MMMI4E4W. 341^200 41 Dot. T, 5 
14 MM OEM 1153M. 64tM«l. .31 Ool, IM i Swrwl 
14' RELYSIS AE'5154, 3401350. 31 Dot, IBcst ValucI 

14- NEC 3D, W?4i7M. .28 Do!, Aiuli>|!,-nL,T-S 

14-yiEWPERFECTVP3.tD24x76339D(n,S0l(Y Tul>>,Sllirp 

14- REWSIS BE-SISS, «««<10, 31 Ool. ATTL.T^ 

14- VIEW PERFECTVP-Z. 6401480, ,29 Anjloj. TjS 349 

14- RELYSIS HE-9S13, 720s4M. 31 BoL Arilog. TS 379 

14- MM OEM 1463172011400, 31 Oot, Al«ll«j, T,S 379 

M' NEC 2A, CUneni, 31 OoL Analog, Tin S Swml 54S 

INPUT/OUTPUT ■ MULJIFUNniDN CARDS 

SERlALCirfl, 2 F^rB, 2nd F*rlOpl.COM 1 * 2(ForXT] 13 

SERIAL Care, ; F^ns. !nO PoH Opl , COM 1-4 (XT) Ilr?l 

SERIAL Cird. 4 F^rte. 3rd I 4lh l^irl 0;!. COM 1-3 |Xr,'AT) ... St^ 

2nd SERIAL f^ri Dpi.— Catilt 4 Chrp Sfft— Pin Conneaor Conflg. rtqirired 

for proper cablfl XT.-AT .. lU'lB 

f»FWLLEL PfllWTER Card. LPTt Dnty.LfT- 1-2-3 (XT.'AT) SilS 

GAME CARD, 2 Puts, Allows AlUdimenlolSJOySOiis . , 11 

GtaXCard, Ciknui t Clock On^, fiis inffi A Slol(j;ninir)^ XT} U 

AT|iO»1, 1 Sir, 1 far, 1 Gimc, COM 1-4, LPT1-2 !S2 

AT I'D »3. 2 Sh, 1 Par. 1 Game. COM 1-4. PI.T1-2 ,. 27 

At l.-O *4 ! Sti«L f EaraW. COM 1-2. LPT1-3 35 

1-0 PLUS. Osdi. C^tndir, Parilil. Sinal. Gamt (lnrXT) 37 

334(i WUIT1 1.0. ftTo 3841:. Cal. Clk. Sar. Pii. Gim« (XT1 39 

MUITI ID. w Floppy CUr. Cil. Sir. Rir. Game (XT) 33 

SUPER MULTI 1-0. w.'fkjpE* Cllr— Conlnils. 36C'720K, 

1-2 and 1 44ir)b FDD. Ca. Clk. Etr, EHr. Came Pari! (XI) 59 

BARE BONES 
XT 
lOmhi Onklop Banbon Sys. . XTAT LiU Ciu. 101 ICB. 150W PiS. 

Fkippr^ Cllr. 360 Floppy Dnvt. 2S6k M(mory 279 

AT2e« 
12mbz 266 Desktop Barebone System, to 4mb WB. 0. hjl 
Sin AT Cau. 220w P.'S. 101 EnhaiKM tteyboard. Fkipfy/KvQ 

Onvt Cootolier. 1 2mb Floppy Disk Onvt 493 

MODEMS 

12D0 EVi:, Iniemil, wrthPCTALKinSoltwlrt 45 

1200 EVEREX. InlMnal. wnh BlTCOM Soltwan 74 

12t)0 (jVC. Ekltmal. odhPCTAlKllSoltmre 5a 

12D0 GVC Eitimal FtKiel Modem „ _ 7B 

2400 OEM !0OM. Inlemil «i!h PC TALK III SolMVI 91 

2400 EVEREX. Innmal mill BFTCOM Sollwaie _ , 13S 

2400 OEM ZOOM. EMsrnal *ilh PROCOMM SofMnm , 105 

Z400GVC. Eilerral, *nb PC TAtk l« Software 109 

2400 GVC. EMtriul, mill PC TALK lU MNP Class 5 ISS 

2400 EVEREX. EilemaJ, «n BITCOH Soltwan 199 

SOmVAKE 

MS DOS 3 3 W.OW BliiC. MM Wfsnjii 5i 

MS DOS 3 3, Actual MICRDSOn , . 84 

MS DDS 4 01 W'-GW Saslc. OEM \«!r Slim— No Bllic MlfflOl 33 

MS DOS 4 01 W,'Anual MICFlSOFTSIim-No Basic Manual U 

MOUSE ■ TRACKBALL - SCANNEBS 

OMOUSE X-3<JM Stream Line 2 Button Senal 24 

OMOUSE X-30M Stream una 2 But Senal Dsluxfl wOR Halo 31 

OMOUSE X-30S Slream line 3 Drmorr Sinai 25 

OMOUSE X-30iS Stream Line 3 But Sinai Diltiq w.'DR Kalo 33 

GEI(iUSGM-600a.SRHAioili,3:,38ulOp(iabaii,35«-1050Hes.,9-25PinAil.p.33 

GENIUSGM-SX OR. Halo 25 

lOGITFCH £.3. n»-{lt DOS S'W. 5CM9,I»0 Rm, Set'Bos ,. 75-35 

MIGHTl TI11CK8ALL. OTRONIX. DR Halo S-W. 9-25 Part Aaiplor 49 

LOGITECH TRACKMAN. 50-15000 plus DPI. 3 B^Un. Sonwart. StrrSuS 95 

Mouse l^>cket. Store idur Mouse Wlwt Not in Use 3 00 

MoiiC* PaC. Son or KiKt 3.0O 

Motise Slape. lidded Stage Placed o^tf ICB lor Mouu 9.5Q 

PS2 Mouse Adapter 4.0O 

J^slits Maaii; OKI IBM I CsmpsiltU'Mloic 909A ISM'Ak*! I5;1T 



Dealers Wanted 




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MAJCI -SWITCH »4 By (Tin Sest) 

MAKI-Sl*nCH 101 my fflit Besll 

KEYTKIKICS Kn Kv (Esalllin) 



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101 KEY Moo-Clitk CapaclUM lacDIj U FuKtion Keyt .^-.. 

101 KEY KEYBOARD TattilBCIIi*. 12 Einvdlonkiys _ 


45 

40 
43 


KT-JO 101.-102 KEY «nh Mtisoll Comeal (Senal or Bus) Tracktaii Mouse. 
20 DP I-B4O0 iiriaHi RKOIimon 95 


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PinJW Priniw CabM $; WokJeil 4.95 

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ACPOW£RC0nO. Fof njwer S^IJ^pty ttj AC DuHrt 3.00 

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Power Cenitr vritti Suiga Prai«tiQn. SitJ Under Monllar tS 

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^xaJar hicilttar -, ..-, .,,,, 2.O0 

At Powfrr Cord CofliMcl? BrtwEWi P'S and AC OvM ...„ .., 300 

AT Fbikm Far MounUng F)(>ppyiHanS Dnv«. Sfllof 2 ,.., „... 3.00 

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Disk DfMS Cfeininfl KiE lor 5-t/4 Dnves 6-O0 

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Pnnlar. iCayboarfl. fc^joM. Otjning Kit „. .- 6-50 

PnriSer stand, Unrvenal, Fits All Prinurs 6,00 

Pnriar Staml nWih P*|Mf Trjy, H«2vy Duty Wrt Oomt ......_.. 11 DO 

Pnmer Stand WKh Enckiad P^rTny „ 17.iXl 

CPU AdJ Stafld. Set Dsskiop Sys on Ftoonn *r1 ftal ..... „.„ 9.D0 

Efl'37S 




A ? ttatifln. RF (fequtncy moniEorinif sysiam Ttan^mitiir 
unii: plugs inlo any AC ouOel. m«jnl$ tisH <Kfiver tt- 
[temefy l*oht*iiDn! and compici Comes eomplate wth 
btn CiipandmigmtfarkilcUcnuse SOOFt maxoperajing 
diAann \ivs 2 AA t»ticni$ FCC appfoved 39,95 



Wilh B pvih oi itic biutian- bkiw awiy dust, ondt p»riicl« 
.aeid srn^tle din from hjrd to rtjcb a.fea-s - k\iict\ apprapriate 
adaptor fnim iwls tuntis^d and Blow Umtt cleans VCti 
bHds. codHMftar teytwards.. icfm^afc, dk&k dnvTS cam- 
m opba ancE ioitns of o^rwr ddtcaie dawn Include 
I brush atadimsnt 2 AA batt 4A0i rnduAd} 7*^b^ 



Racing Battery 

Ttifs. 7 2V T^OOmAH EiatLgfy i^ i liixt giade baitery licm 
llw matchKl , Twin sMt siUs , to y« r>eavv dirty higEi temp 
vk^nt wut lei;dS- firu line facing partt bviit to ^h 
landanis 19.BD' 



Pomt^i »lld stale amplrtar 
FulurK incFvtfe'burlE-m jwtttTi- 
ipHKfjibie alarm airen. whtstlQ. 
Iigtit. jHstpE gnp press la taFk 
switch wi control. aiKE^i^ider 
Strap-SCMll bHttries-jnotsuppt 
DELUDE WECAPHOHE 129.35 

WITH SIREI*. WHimt * LKtHT '^'Hllh U-t >- 

BiilDia- 9-i,i6" 

Wgi,3'/^-|bi w.-o Ban 

Wtflag* 20WW» 

Elfw Rtv» l200Ft 



(J:? 




2115 Old Oakland Road 
San Jose, CA 95131 



One yea* wairanly uoless otherwise indicated- • '30 day warranty- 

XT* AT* i Jewr" Are Regrsl.ird Trat**m»r* . 01 rnlfrm.t,on*i eusinest laaciiinM. - Piic»4 ari? suhtKi lo chanffff wirtiout natic*. 

$1 Rebate per $100 on all phone orders (ex., $5.00 rebate for $yOO order) 



408-432-7380 

TECH SUPPORT 408-432-7557 FAX 408-432-8622 

Call Of nrile lof shipping details A S3.00 handling charge is applied W all orders plus a nwimurn 
ol S4 00 Ireigh! GEMS ivt// ship UPS. fED EX. or sny other recognized teig'if seiwcf )5'. 
reslocking lee applied 10 good relumed merchandise tor refund 

til Biiiinea Since 1985 • A mcmbcf of the Ch.imbpr of Comrvfrrp 



RE-SHOPPER 



LEARN ELECTRONICS FROM VHS VIDEO TAPES! 








Oar Video Tapes 

Are Designed 

To Moke Learning Electronics 

Fan and Easy I 



• PART 1-DC, 53 miB $32.K 

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47 min $32.95 

Electronics and You— VT-20J 

• PART 4-POWER SUPPLY 

55 min S32.9S 

Electronics and You— VT-206 



• PART S-AMPUFIERS 

52 min $32.95 

Electronics and You— VT-207 

• PART 6-OSCILLATORS 

54 min $32.95 

Electronics and You— VT-30g 

• VCR MAINTENANCE & REPAIR 

VT-203— 54 min $32,95 

• INTRODUCTION TO VCR REPAIR 

VT-204— 110 Min $59.95 




CALL TOLL FREE AT 

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VIS* 

mail check or money order to: ulA** ^o^^V 

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SERVICING THE WORLD OF MICROS 
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A higfi snd alarm system at an atfordabfe price t 
Features Include: 

* State oMhe en POP 8200 Speech Synthesizer 
1 21 Seneor ZDnea, 2 Arming Circuits 

t 2 Five Watt Audio Amplifiers 

* AuxlliaTY Alarm 

» Real Time 2A Hr, Clool! 

t A IDA & 3A Relay CIrguil (or Sirens, etc, 

♦ Alert/Sleep Monitoring Modes (verbal status) 

♦ TrlQfler Memory (verbal status) 

# Self Diagnostica & Psrformanca Monitoring 
I Microprocessor Controlled 

* Pleasant Female Voice 

t Expandlblllty i. so much MOREI 

Available as a kit or pre- 
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catalog I A compW^ Une of 
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Complete Circuit Board kit 
1220 plus $10.50 S&H. (Ca. 
residents add &75% tax). 



Hliulin ElectntaEti 

K'125-S Soleaad Cyri w 
SujiB 333, Dept P£ 
Oonvon Qxntiy. CA i?)35I, 

'fSk frutttt gmt lutlt 




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LEARN TO 

CLEAN/MAtNTAIN/REPAIR 

FAX MACHINES 



HU6E NEW UNTAPPED MARKET! 




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majcliines in 2 weeks! 
[F' No special tools/equipirent needeil - nc neeil tor t 

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• Fax mactilnes are not cheap -ttieretore, you can get good 
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• Average Fax niacltine requires professional service every 
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CALL 1-S00-53T-0SS9 

OriNrfti to: Viejo Publications, Inc. 

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CIRCLE 349 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



B. 6. MICRO 



P. 0. Box 280298 DllUs, Tims 7$228_ 





7400 


7¥M 


.17 


7474 


.30 


741 S2 


.50 




7«01 


.17 


7475 


.35 


74163 


.50 




7*oa 


.17 


74S2 


.30 


741 H 


.70 




T4W 


.17 


74»3 


.45 


74185 


.70 




7*0* 


.17 


74M 


.30 


74150 


.90 




7405 


.17 


74«5 


.55 


74173 


.75 




7«« 


.23 


74M 


.30 


74174 


.70 




7«07 


.13 


74«a 


.30 


74175 


.80 




74M 


.23 


7490 


.37 


74170 


.50 




740B 


.17 


74W 


.30 


T4177 


.50 




H\0 


.17 


7493 


.30 


741 M 


.50 




7*13 


.33 


74M 


.30 


741 ei 


.35 




7<14 


.25 


7497 


.30 


741 N 


.SO 




741 S 


.20 


741 K 


.35 


741 M 


.25 




7417 


.20 


74107 


.20 


74105 


.00 




74ZC 


.17 


74111 


.35 


74187 


.25 




74JS 


.2$ 


74120 


.30 


74199 


1.00 




74H 


.17 


74125 


.40 


74221 


.M 




7437 


.25 


74120 


,1B 


74251 


.25 




7421 


.a, 


7413B 


.19 


74258 


,78 




74afl 


.15 


74130 


.18 


742(5 


.50 




7432 


.27 


74144 


.20 


742J3 


1.75 




7433 


.25 


74145 


.40 


74278 


.50 




7437 


.17 


7414« 


.«0 


74278 


.50 




743a 


.23 


74150 


.25 


74203 


.50 




7440 


.19 


74151 


.50 


T430S 


.M 




7442 


.35 


74153 


.35 


74355 


.50 




74Sa 


.17 


74154 


1.1» 


74307 


.90 




74S1 


.1« 


741 SS 


.M 


743U 


.30 




T453 


.22 


74157 


.30 


74370 


.30 




7454 


.22 


74110 


.iO 


74390 


1.40 




7473 


.2S 


T4151 

mi 


.50 


^ 


■ 




1 LSM 


■ 
.14 


LS1Z2 


m 

.35 


LSJ41 


.M 




1 LB02 


.14 


LS123 


.45 


LS24: 


.65 




1 LS03 


,14 


L5125 


.30 


LS243 


SO 




1 UM 


.14 


L312« 


.»5 


LS244 


.5S 




■ LSOS 


.14 


LSI 32 


M 


LS245 


SS 



LS09 

LS10 

1511 

LS12 

LS13 

LS14 

LS15 

L$20 

LS21 

LS2S 

LS2T 

LS2S 

LSJO 

LS32 

LS33 

LS37 

LS3« 

LS42 

LS51 

LS54 

LS55 

LS74 

U75 

1.SS3 

LM5 

LSM 

L3W 

LS92 

L595 

LS107 

U109 

L£1t2 

US113 

LS1 14 



.14 IS133 

.14 LS138 

.14 t.S139 

.14 LSI 45 

.20 LSI 45 

.25 LS151 

.30 LSI 53 

.£0 LSI 54 

.14 LSI 55 

.15 LSlse 

.14 1,5157 

.20 LS15S 

.15 LSI 60 

.14 LS161 

.10 LSI 62 

■iS LS163 
LSI 54 
LS1E5 

.35 LSI 65 

.15 LS1E9 
LSI 73 
LSI 74 

.22 LSI 75 

.25 L£1S1 

.30 LSI 01 

.45 LSI 82 

.20 LSI 93 

.35 LS194 

,30 LS195 

.30 LS1«e 

,2« L5197 

.20 LS221 

.25 LS240 
.25 
,25 



.24 
.24 



.20 
.20 



.25 L52S1 .45 

.35 LS253 .40 

.36 L5257 .39 

.75 LS256 .45 

.35 LS25S 1.00 

.35 LS2BD .40 

.35 LS2S0 

.59 LS273 

.50 LS270 

.42 LS2S0 

.30 LS2a3 

.29 LS2W 

.25 LS29S 

.39 LS323 2.35 

.45 LSm3 1.00 

.36 LS357 

.45 LS3«3 

.50 LS35S 

.75 LS367 

.90 L5366 

.80 LS373 

.39 LS374 

.35 L5379 

1,JS LS377 

.45 LS37a 

LS3S0 

LS393 



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POWER SUPPLIES 

74S 

74ALS 

74F 

74 HC 

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zeo 

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F.D. CONTROLLERS 

CLOCK CIRCUITS 

DRIVERS 

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CRT CONTROLLERS 

MUCH, MUCH MORE! 

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FREE CATALOG. 



9502 2.00 

5920 1.25 

5532 ,.., 2.70 

5530 3.00 

5532 4.25 

9S45 1.10 

6551 2.40 



.05 

.65 

.40 

.52 LS541 

.95 L3545 

.75 LS«40 

.50 LS570 

.50 
26LS32 .79 

35LS2569 1.50 



.00 
.75 
.30 
.35 
.30 
.50 
.45 
.35 
.75 
.80 
.60 
.75 
1.00 

i.a) 

.75 
.75 
.60 



500O 
5S02 

5603 

5005 

5609EP 

S509P 

6610 

5B45P 

6645S 

5850 



1.40 
2.50 
3.0O 
2.99 
2.75 
2.90 
1.35 
2.M 
2.20 
1,75 



5552 

6558 



3.90 
3.99 

60«0 3,80 

MAOt£P 1.25 
50A40 4,80 

50*54 3.00 

C5S09 4.0O 

50B1D 2.00 

66B49 4.»5 

B6B54 4.00 



THREE CHIP SET 



1486, 1489, 16450 

B.G. SPECIAL 

SG.SO 



VOLTAGE REGULATORS 



NETWORK 



$25. K) 

(LAN) NETWORK 

THAT REALLY WORKS! 

CAUL OR WRITE 
FOR DETAILS, 



LM317K 

LM317T 

LM337T 

T605T 

7eM09T 

7e05T 

7I00T 

7S10T 

751 2T 

7S12CK 

7»W12T 

781 ST 



1.40 
.50 
.90 
.35 
,25 
.26 
it) 
.20 



T615K 

781 SK 

7824T 

7875T 

7M5K 

7905T 

79M05T 

7I12T 

7912K 

7>t9K 

LM350K 

7tM09K 



.50 
.60 
,39 

.30 
.75 
.40 
.29 
.35 
,9« 
.30 
3.35 
3.76 



DYNAMIC RAM 



3108-4 BKX1 1.» 

2115-4 1 6KX1-SVolt 70 

4027.4KJ(1,250 n.l. ,M 

4116-16KX1-250 n.l 40 

4116-16KX1.200 n.> 75 

4116 ieKX1-150n.t .....90 

41E4-B4K 200 lU. )0 

4164 150 n.l 1.25 

41E4 120 n.l 1.50 

4164-100 1.75 

TMS4416-1E«X4-1S0 n.l. ... 2.75 

4464-150 2.25 

4444-120 2.59 

4464-100 3.05 

4125* 150 n.t 1.79 

41255 110 n.l 2.05 

41295 100 n.l 2.39 

41255-80 2.M 

41255-60 4.D0 

1 M>g- 100 nj. 8.00 

1 M»9-60n.i 8.35 

41429e-S0 n.l. 296 I 4 9.00 

SIPPS « SIMMS AVAILABLE 



STATIC RAM 



2016-2KX8 200 n.l 1.O0 

3101-1 - 2S«X4 SCO I1.1 75 

21L02-1 390 n.l 65 

2103AL-4 LP. 450 nj 49 

2111-1 296X4 900 n.l 1.00 

2113A-2 3.50 

2114L-3 1KX4 300 n.l 49 

2125A-2 mXI 70 n.t 1.70 

2147 4KX1 1,95 

5116P-4 1.20 

6117 1.20 

6164-15 1.40 

62355 33KX6 6,90 



EPROM SPECIAL 



t bou^t ■ IK^ quanllly d 3706i, 
37164, 35331, 37321, 27641, 27118 
■ nd 17256 from m compulii' 
muiu1tc1ur«r wtio ridMlgnid Ihilr 
boardt. W« nmovid thim fnyn 
locktl*. iriM^ and vaHflad m«m. 
and ncnv «1 oftar tha savinga to you. 
Complata Hllilftdlofi ^uarantaad. 



Your Chotc* 

2705 1.20 

2715 1.79 

2932 2.00 

.2732 2.00 

2764 2.39 

27126 3.30 

27396 389 



10/6.00 
10/19.00 
10/17.50 
W17.50 
tO/lODO 
10/27.50 
10/32J0 



W( Alto Htm Ht» EPflOMS 



8000/80000 



6031 

0035 

6039 

60«5 

6056 

6067 

6087-1 

6057-2 

8066 

60Ce6 

8155 

8156 

6202A 

8211 

8214 

5216 

5224 

8228 

5237-5 

5143 

5150 



1.95 
1.00 
1.00 
1.99 
1.55 
67.50 
167.50 
127,50 
2.70 
.40 
2.29 
2J5 
6.00 
1.25 
2.08 
1.25 
1.25 
1.75 
3.60 
1.75 
1.8* 



(16450) 

(16990) 

6251 

6253-5 

6254 

5255 

5295-5 

8157 

8299A 

6159C-5 

8275 

6179 

tlM 

6285 

6367 

8280 

6530 

8741 

8746 

8749 

(755 



6.50 
12.00 
1.10 
1.75 
1.80 
1.50 
1.75 
1.50 
1.65 
2.10 
10.95 
2J5 
1.49 
3.50 
2.49 
3.50 
3,00 
7.00 
7.00 
7.00 
7.0O 



60266-6 PLCC 6.50 
80267-8 191,90 

60167-10 227.50 

V-20-10MHZ 6.50 



TEXT TO SPEECH BOARD 



PC/XT COMPATIBLE. 
MAKE YOUR COMPUTER TALK! 




ASSEMBLED a TESTED 

ADD $3.50 SHIPPINO 

a HANDLIKQ 



$69 



95 



A VEHY POWERFUL ANO AMAZING SPEECH CARD. USES 
THE NEW GENERAL INSTRUMEKTS SPCI25S-AL2 SPEECH 
CHIP AND THE CTS256A-AL2 TEXT TO SPEECH 
COMVERTEfi. 

THIS BOARD USES ONE SLOT ON THE MOTHERBOARD 
AND REQUIRES A COM SERIAL PORT. BOARD MAY ALSO 
B£ USED IN A STAND ALONE ENVIRONMENT (EXTERNAL 
POWER SUPPLY) WITH ALMOST ANY COMPUTER THAT 
HAS A HS232 SERIAL PORT. TC USE THE BOARD IT IS 
ONLY NECESSAdY TO SEND ENGLISH TEXT TO THE 
RS231 INPUT ON THE BOARD. THE BOARD INCLUDES A 
1500 BYTE TEXT BUFFER AND HANDSHAKE LINE TO 
ALLOW YOU TO SEND DATA TO THE BOARD: THE SAME 
AS YOU WOULD SEND DATA TO AN RS333 SERtAL 
PRINTER. YOU CAN SET UP BATCH FILES THAT WILL 
MAKE YOUR COMPUTER GREET YOU WITH ■QOOD 
MORNING MASTER," ETC. EVERY TIME YOU TURN IT ON. 
DEMONSTRATION SOFTVKARE AND A LIBRARY 
BUILDING PROORAM ARE INCLUDED ON A 5Vi INCH 
PC/XT DISKETTE. FULL DOCUMENTATION AND 
SCHEMATICS ARE ALSO INCLUDED. 
FOR INFORMATION ON A LOW COST SPEECH 
SYNTHESIZER SYSTEM FOR THE VISUALLY IMPAIRED. 
PLEASE SEND FOR FREE PACKET T.M.1. 



STAND ALONE POWER SUPPLY 

FOR ABOVE 

ADD $2.90 SHIPPING 8 HANDLING 



$19 



99 



IBM PC, XT COMPATIBLE KEYBOARD 



IBM, PC, XT COMPATIBLE KEYBOARD 

CHEAP PRICE 
EXCELLENT QUALITY 

COMPUTER MANUFACTURERS EXCESS. 

BRAND NEW UNITS MANUFACTURED BY HONEYWELL. 

COfLED CONNECTING CABLE. 

HAS SAME MAKE AND BREAK CODES AS STANDARD PC, 

XT KEYBOARD. 

WORKS FINE WITH CLONES ANC COMPATIBLES. 

ADJUSTABLE REAR ELEVATION CONTROL (3 LEVEL). 
ORIGINAL COST IN EXCESS OF 565.00 EACH. 



*1955 o,3/t475o 

Add S3,00 Bidi Tor ihlpplng 



SOCKETS 



Low PnilD* SOLDER TAIL 
6 Pin 14('1.00 



BAUD RATE 
aENERATOR 



t Pin 
14 Rn 
16 Pin 
16 Pin 
20 Pin 
Z2 Pin 
24 Pin 
28 Pin 
40 Pin 



13'l,e0 
13/1 .00 
13/1 .00 
13/1.00 
13/1,00 
13/1.00 
6/1.00 
7/1.00 
7/1.00 



BUY 510 
GET 61.00 - FREE CHOICE 



N516450 
16550 ... 
BH1941 .. 



12.00 
. 3.0O 



1949(WDn3«M-00} 2.D0 

COM6115 2.00 

INS6250 2,86 

MC 14411 S,99 



TERMS: (Unless specllieij elsewhere) Add S2.50 postage, we pay balance Orders ovei S50 OD add 85c (of insurance. No CO D. Texas Res. add 
8 V c Tax. 90 Day Money Back Guarantee on all items. All items subject to prior sale. Prices sub|ecl to ctiange wittiout notice. Foreign order - US lunds 
only. We cannot ship to Menico. Countries ottier ttian Canada, add S4.50 shipping and handling. 



6/90 



RE-SHOPPER a 



ft AMIGA-Commodore/^MieA^ 
^ Chips... Parts... Upgrades 

6526 $12.25 

6567 $14.95 

6581 $11.25 

PLA (82S100) $12.95 

All 901 Roms $10.95 

41256/120 $2.95 

A501-512K Ram $99.50 

*FatterySuper Agnus $99.50 

8362 Denise $39.95 

8364 Paula $49.94 

8520A $17.95 

1.3 Kickstart Rom $27.95 

256 X 4/100 $9.50 

1 MEG X 1/120 $9.40 

^Includes Chip Puller (many others in stock) 



Commodore Diagnostician S6.95 prepaid 



• NEW, POWERFUL • 
REPAIRABLE C-64 POWER SUPPLY 

• 13-month warranty 

• Complete schematic included $23.95 

• External fuse — runs cool PLUS 

• UL Approved UPS 

• Heavy duty — perfect for "packet radio" 

• Conservatively rated (cc 1.8 amps 

• Made by Commodore sub-contractor 



Amiga Upgrade.New 1 Megabyte 'Fatter AGNUS' Chip 8372 
S99.50 with simple step step 10 min. Instructions and chip puller 



SEND FOR CATALOG ON EXCLUSIVE NEW PRODUCTS 

THE GRAPEVINE GROUP, INC. 

35 Charlotte Drive, Wesley Hills, N.Y. 10977 

1-800-292-7445 • (914) 354-4448 

FAX (914) 354-6698 

Dealer Prices Available Prices Sublect To Change 



Motorless Motion! 



Robotics I Engines! Inventions.' 
Thin Shape Memory Alloy wires, 
contract like living muscle when 
electrically activated. 

Space Wings - Sleek silver wings 
flap silently using only 5 cm of 
SMA wire. Assemble this futuristic 
kit in under an hour. Stands 15 cm 
high. Perches on your PC or desk 
lamp. Annoys cats. With printed 
circuit board, parts, info on SMAs, 
and complete instructions. Runs on 
two AA batteries (not included), 

3-001 Space Wings Kit $19.95 




Send a business size Sitf-Addressed Stamped Envelope for latest catalog. 

Order Today - Send check or money order (sorry no credit cards). 
CA orders add 7.25% tax. All orders add $4 P&H ($8 to Canada). 



MondO'tronics • 2476 Verna Ct. 
San Leandro, CA 94577 • USA 



CIRCLE 337 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




4-Piece Electronics Pliers Kit 



* U.S. Made -A- Lifetime Guarantee 
Finest quality alloy steel pliers with 
color-coded cushion grip handles. 
Includes 4-1/2" miniature diagonal 
cjtter, 5-1/2" diagonal cutter, 6-3/4" 
chain nose viHh cutter, 4-3/4" miniature 
chain nose and vinyl roll pouch. Charge 
Visa, MasterCard. American Express or 
send check or money order. 
RES>e2 Pliers Kit ... $39.00 

We pay the stitpplng charges. 



JENSeMTODLS INC. 

7815 S. 46th St. Phoenix, AZ 85044 < Phone (602) 9684231 • FAX (602) 438-1690 



CIRCLE 338 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




Annerican Heart 
Association 



^ 



THE ULTIMATE 
PERSONAL 

DUac 

95 



UV ERASER 



39 



Add 3!£ 

Shipping i Hauling 

Also Avaiiat)(fl 

DH.CT 49^ 

AC wtUi intftrinal 2 - 8 minut* 
tim«r snd tim« out b««p4r. 

D1[B 3!;^49*^ 

Bftfl^ry powsrsHd for IQC cvclofr. 
IniflmaJ 2-B min. tirn«r, » 
Optional AC adaptor 7 

W^LLinC CO. 

4401 S. Juniper • Tempe, AZ 85282 



Molded Ptastlc Case • Shirt Pocket Size - Auto Stan 
- Erases inost EPBOM's/EPLD's in 3 minutes 
KaiKlles all sizes up to tour at a time 

• Regulated lamp output for unifaiin 
erase time 




Dealer Inquiries welcome. 

6 month unconditional guarantee. 

Order direct or call for dealer near you. 

(602)838-1277 1-800-338-9813 



r 



Are vou in 



D EFA U LT 



On a Student Loan? 

If you're in default on a 
guaranteed student loan (FISL, 
GSL, Stafford, SLS, or PLUS 
loan), you may be eligible for 
a special program that lets you 
pay it back without penalty or 
collection charges. 

You must pay your loan in full 
by August 31, 1990 to take 
advantage of this special 
program. For information, 
call the guarantee agency that 
holds your loan, or call the 
U.S. Ctepartment of 
Education's toll-free number; 

(800) 333-INFO 



36 RE-SHOPPER 



ALL^^ 



PLASMA 



^•^ 




Become the 
Lord of your Galaxy 
or the Hit of the Party! 



Length of visible fiasmk fire Add is controlled by your 
touch. Creates a bizzare and spectacular effect. 
Available in Star Fire Red, Photon Blue, Nova Purple, 
and Phasor Green. Please specify color. 

PFS20 FIRE SABRE (battery not tnduded) $89.50 

PFS2K EASY TO BUILD KIT EwwffentSosncs Pmjectl $59.50 



Quantity 
Dsmuflts 



10-24 
$i5.00 



£5-99 
$40.00 



100+ 
$35.00 



1,000+ 
Price on Req 



\pumm wm. yumr 



Experience the mystifying 

beauty of 

PLASMA STIK UGHTING™ 

Highly Efficient Cold Cathode 
design uses UL lo volt adapter. 



fMunns 

Available in: 

• Garden Green 

•Pool Blue 

•Walkway 

White 

Warning Red 



nv-H3i 



• Safe, Easy to Install - 
simply push into ground 

• Weatherproof, 
durable construction 

• Economical to operate - 
less than 2 watts 

Basic system includes one STIK LITE and a pwwer 
adapter capable of driving up to 3 extra "AD-ON's". 
Buy extra STIK LITE as needed. Specify color(s). 

STIK Basic System, l Stik Ute 

with power adapter (or 3 AD-ON's $49.50 

EKTRA STIK LITE ADON's, Each $29.50 



PRODUCTS 



IMIMI(SM»S®®M 



^m, 




IM 



Brightly lit columns of colorful 
plasma move up and down with 
the intensity of sounds and 
music picked up by the 

• Mounts Anywhere "^^^^ built-in microphone. 

• 26 Inches Long! 

• 12VDC/U5VAC Operation 

• Adjustable Sensitivity 

• Available in Star Fire Red, 
Photon Blue, Nova Puiple and 
Phaser Green (please specify) 

DPL20 DANCING PLASMA ^.50 

DPL2K EASY TO BUILD m $69.50 



Discounts 



10-24 
152.00 



25-99 
$47.00 



10O+ 
$40,00 



1,000+ 
Pries on Raq 



'Decor W mi Mi» 



Brightly lit columns of colorful neon for 
enhancing, lighting or decorating. 



Available in- 

• Star Fire Red 

• Photon Blue 

• Nova Purple 

• Phasor Green 



iTM 




• Mounts Anywhere 

■ Lightweight, Durable 

Actual 26 inches in Length 

• Special Effects - Strobing 

• Low Voltage Operation 

• Simple, Safe 



DNE10 DECOR NEON $79.50 

DNE1K EASY TO BUILD KIT $59.50 



Ouantitr 
Discounts 



10-24 
$39.00 



25-99 
$35.00 



100+ 
$30.00 



1,000+ 
Price on Req 



Most products on this sheet are matte possible through a recently obtained patent for single ended energizing of neon display signs and 
lighting systems. Ref U.S. Patent #4,742,278. All requests for quantity or dealer discounts are welcome. You may fax us at 603-672-5406. 
PtTone orders BOO-221-1705 or 603-673-4730 for 24 hour senrice. Call 603-673-6493 for information. 



FAX ORDERS: 1 '603-672-5406 I PHONE ORDERS: 1-800-221-1705 



INFORMATION UNUNITED 



P.O. Box 716 



Amherst, New Hampshire 03031 



603-6734730 



ORDERS; BOO-221-1705 



RE-SHOPPER 



USE R-E SHOPPER CLASSIFIEDS 

READ BY MORE THAN 100,000 ELECTRONICS BUYERS AND 

SELLERS AND TRADERS 



INSTRUCTION FOR PLACING YOUR AD! 



HOW TO WRITE YOUR AD 

TYPE or PRINT your classified ad copy CLEARLY (not in all 
capitals) using the form below. If you wish to place more than one 
ad, use a separate sheet for the additional ads (a photocopy of 
this form works well). Choose a category from the list below and 
write that category number into the space at the top of the order 
form. !f you do not specify a category, we will place your ad under 
Miscellaneous or whatever section we deem most appropriate. 

We cannot bill for classified ads. Payment in full must accompany 
your order. We do permit repeat ad or multiple ads in the same 
issue, but in all cases, full payment must accompany your order. 

WHAT WE DO 

The first two words of each ad are set in bold caps at no extra 
charge. No special positioning, centering, dots, extra space, etc. 
can be accommodated. 

RATES 

Our classified ad rate is 40* per word. Minimum charge is $6.00 



per ad per insertion (15 words). Any words that you want set in 
tiold or caps are 10c each extra. Bold caps are 20C each extra. 
Indicate bold words by underlining. Words normally written in all 
caps and accepted abbreviations are not charged as all-caps 
words. State abbreviations must be Post Office 2- letter abbrevia- 
tions. A phone number is one word. 

CONTENT 

All classified advertising in the R-E Shopper is limited to elec- 
tronics items only. All ads are subject to the publisher's approval. 
We reserve the right to reject or edit all ads. 

DEADLINES 

Ads received by our closing date will mn in the next issue. For 
example, ads received by June 11 will appear in the September, 
1990 Issue that is mailed on July 10. No cancellations permitted 
after the closing date. No copy changes can be made after vie 
have typeset your ad. NO REFUNDS, advertising credit only. No 
phone orders. 



AD RATES: 40c per word. AAinimum S6.00. 



Send your ads with payment to: 

Radio-Electronics SHOPPER, 500-B Bl-County Blvd. Farmingdale, NY 11735 



CATEGORIES 



too — Antique Electronics 270 — Computer Equipment Wanted 

■(30 — Audio- Video- Lasers 300 — Computer Hardware 

160 — Business Opportunities 330 — Computer Software 

190 — Cable TV 360 — Education 

210 — CB-Scanners MO — FAX 

240 — Components 420 — Ham Gear For Sale 



450 — Ham Gear Wanted 

480 — Miscellaneous Electronics For Sale 660 — Satellite Equipment 

510 — Miscellaneous Electronics Wanted 690 — Security 

540 — Music & Accessories 

570 — Plans-Kits-Schematics 

600 — Publications 



630 — Repairs- Services 



710 — Telephone 
720 — Test Equipment 



CLASSIFIED AD COPY ORDER FORM 



Ad No. 1 — Place this ad in Category # 



1- 


$6,00 


5 


$6.00 


9- 


$6.00 


13 


-$6.00 


17 


-$6.80 


21 


-$e.40 


2S 


-$10.00 









2 -$6.00 


3 - $6.00 


4 - $6.00 


6 - $6.00 


7 - $6.00 


8 -$6.00 


10 - $6.00 


11 - $6.00 


12 - $6.00 


14 - $6.00 


15 - $6.00 


16 - $6.40 


18 - $7.20 


19 - $7.60 


20 - $B.0O 


22 - se.eo 


23 - $9.20 


24 - $9.60 


26 - $10.40 
1 Payment $ _ 


27 - $10,80 

nndnsBrf 


28 -$11.20 



[ ] Check [ ] MasterCharge [ j Visa ($15.00 minimum credit 
card order) 

Name 



29 - $11,60 



30 - $12.00 31 - $12.40 32 - $12.80 



33 -$12.00 34 -$13.60 35 -$14.00 36 -$14.40 



37 -$14.80 36 -$15.20 39 - $15.60 40 -$16.00 



Ad No 1 — Total words 

All Caps words . 
Bold words 
Bold Cap words . 



-x.40perword = $, 
-X .10 per word = $ . 
.X .lOper word = $ , 
.x.20perword=$ . 



TOTAL COST OF AD No. 1 $ 



Card #. 



Expiration Date / . 

Signature 



. Phone , 



Address , 



, City State Zip , 



i RE-SHOPPER 



CABLE TV BLOWOUT 



Jerrold 450 Combo DRZ 3 QIC 



With new remote, 
68 channel 
original equipment 
automatic fine tuning 



WE WILL MEET OR BEAT 
ANY ADVERTISED PRICE 
IN THIS MAGAZINEl 




PLEASE PRIMT: J Ciahlaf»Cli»ek J Money Qrdtr -ICOD 



Quantity 



Hem 



Name: 

Address: 

City/Stalefflp: 



Price B8. Total 






OROeRSONLY: 



1-800-622-9022 

FREE CATALOG* INFO' 

(203) 975-7543 

10 AM 5:30 PM EASTERN TtME 

»*0e0hhiECTiCuT5>'LES II n nirtitiB ^IwH el 

UNIVgR^Al. VIEW IQ OB'i'Ajd in^ a»t W*ri%Ai^ C^nW wnd It 

MnH nD[ BI143 AAf rjOTfurff V liV'v'du'Ai fi dang aa 



WAIVER. 1. the undersigned, am a cons«ntiirig sdun of al l^ast 2t year? ol 
ag#, and lu!ly uncfsr^tand (hal cwnershtp of a caWe decoder does not grve 
Ihe owner ol !he decode [he nghv lo decode or view o'emFum cable 
channels w»thou! proper authwiratioft 1roim iheir local cable company, and 
hereby declare uride:! penally a\ perjury that a>ll pnixFucTs purchased, at any 
time, will only b* used Ofi cable TV syiterns with proper autlwrizalion tfom 
^ocal olficiais or cable cornpany officers m accordance with all appticable 
feda^al and slate laws Federal and vanous &late laws pjcvide far 
sub^laniial cnmtnal ^nd C^vil p«na1|ies Ioit Linaulhonzed use. 



Signature 



Date 



RE-SHOPPER 



FREE CATALOG 



Loaded With Satellite TV Products At Discount Prices 



• Complete Systems 

• Upgrades 

• 2ft to 24ft Dishes 



• Parts 

• Accessories 

• IUIa|or Brands 



• Factory Fresh 

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• Fast Delivery 







Satellite 




WORLD SATELLITE TV AND 
SCRAMBLING METHODS 

"The Technicians' Handbook' 

This thorough text is a must-buy [or technicians, 
satellite professionals and curious do-it-yourselfers. 
The design, operatitxi and repair of sateilile anten- 
nas, feeds, LNBs, receivers and modulators are ex- 
examined in detail. An in-depth study of scrarnbllng 
methods and broadcast formats induding the 
VideoOpher II, Oak Orion, FilmNet, Sky Channel, 
EuroCypher, D2 MAC, BSB and Teledub Payview 
III. Circuit aind bbck diagrams of all corriponents are 
presented and dearly exa/nined throughout the 
handbook. This informatiofi is a prelude to the 
chapters on troubleshooting and setting up a test 
bench. This expert guidance on testing, servidng 
and timing is complimented by a wealth of detailed 
illustrations. 

J44) pi^ti, 8 111 1 1B M av*r zoo photos, dlagrtms, 
wiring uhttnttics and 16 tiblis t *pp*ndici> / iiid*x 
Ofdtr #211 S&K 14 (U.S.) $39,9S 




THE SKYVISION DO-IT-YOURSELF 
INSTALLATION VIDEO 

"Now You Can Watch It Being Done' 
installing or Tuning up" your satellite system 
made simple. From start to finish, the Sky vision 
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video ^at will help you set-up your systems in no 
time flat. Ifs tike having our trained technicians 
right at your site helping you wilh every step. 

Ord*r iSKIO VHS ...^H 13 (U.S) t33.9S 

Ord*rfSK11 B«ta S&N$3(U.S) t33.9S 



TV 




Anywhere 





TUNE YOUR DISH TO ITS 
MAXIMUM! 

'With The Pico Signal Meter" 

A must for ^e serious dealer or satellite 
system owner. Saves time, frustration and money. 
Use when instailine a new system, moving your 
dish, re-alignment of a dish that has been moved 
by wind, frost fwaves etc., gets you right on the 
satellite belt for ihe best possible picturesi The 
PP-1450 Pico PeaKer is a super sensitive signal 
meter used for antenna aiming, focusing, peaking 
and polarity alignment. The multi-purpose Peaker 
can t>e used on any receiver system with block 
down-convened frequences between 70 and 
1 500 MHz. [Does not work with older single 
conversion receivers - Ask foe Bulz-I-Meter) The 
Peaker comes in an attractive case with r>eck strap. 

Ordtr IPP-14S0 . SiH U (U.S.) ....-»9.95 

Cptional jurrp cabb kit. Conroos Peaker to LN8 
(Kit irx:ludes 2ei, 12' coax cables w/ spiles r). 
OrtJer IC212 SIH U $7,95 



IRDs / RECEIVERS / SYSTEMS 

"Save $$$ on Pach:ages" 
System package Includes: ORBITRON lO toot 
mesh dish, BOde^jree LNB. IB' Jack Arm, Feed- 
horn and Becesver/tRD olyour choice, plus a 
FREE detailed irrslallation Video. 

IflCWBCeiver System 

(Receiver) $219 

(ReceivaiJ 

(IHD) 

(IRD) 

(slave recv.) 

tlHD) 

um 

(IRDj 

(IHD) 

(ReceivBr) 

(fiecoiveO 

tIRD) 

(IRD) 

(IRD) 

(Slave recv.) 



UNIDEN UST2200 
UWIDEN UST9000 
UNIDEN UST7700 
UNII3EN UST9900 
UNIDEN UST4200 
UNIDEN UST4400 
UNIDEN UST4800 
HTSV 

HTS VIII Plus 
J-TTS X 

DRAKE ESR324b 
DRAKE ESR924i 
DRAKE ESR1024 
DRAKE ESR1224 
DRAKE ESR1424 
ECHOSTAR 3000 
ECHOSTAR 4000 



$449 

$899 

$1019 

$679 

$909 

$1539 

$1049 

$1229 

$1419 

$239 

$599 

$909 

$1039 

$1209 

$729 



$999 
$1449 
$1569 

$1459 
$2069 
$1599 
$1779 
$1969 

$1149 
$1459 
$1589 
$1759 



$1399 



(IRD) $949 

Just a partial listing of hundreds of products listed 
in the Skyvison catalog. Ask for your's today! 



2048 College Way Fergus Fslle, MN S6537 - Toll Free 800-334-6455 

Mail in coupon or call Toll FREE today lor the SKYVISION Satellite TV Product Catatag. 

Delivered free to your mail box in U.S. and its holdings. 

* International requests add $8.00 to cover shipping and handling. 

Send Sicyvislon Satellite TV Products Catalog 

Phon e ( ) 




D! 



Name. 



State 



2ip_ 



Install A System, Upgrade or Repair Yourself And Save $$$$ 



40 RE-SHOPPER 



CIRCl-E 350 ON FREE IMFORMATION CARD 




FIG. 3— THE MECHANICAL ASSEMBLY of the Lawn Ranger. 
f nee I u^aw^lA^fi 



h-^ 



JM7 



J1-1B 



'"xr* 



SI -a S2-a S3-a S4-a SS-a S&a S7-a 

""I <^ ^M^ <^ ffch ^ f fcPi f^ 

S15-a S14-aS13-s S12-a S11-a SlO-a S9-a (:[) Se-a 



J1-19 



TJ^^V^V ^^V V- 




sib S2-b S3-ti S4-b SS-ti S&-b S7-b S8-b 



J1-1 



J1-2 



J1-3 



J1-4 



J1-S 



^\|/ \[/ \1/ \|/ \|/ \J/ \i/\[^ij 



J1-6 



J1-7 



J1-S 



J1-15 



JM4 






J1-13 



J1-12 



J1-11 



J1-10 



J1-9 



^V^J 




I ^ 


.SEWSORS, 
P 1-15 ^ 


) o 


w 


// 


r-| 


( 


d 



FIG. 4— WIRE THE GRASS SENSORS as shown here. 



Chassis wiring 

Wire the chassis as shown in 
Fig. 5. Use 18-gauge stranded 
wire for the high-current cut- 
ting- and drive-motor connec- 
tions. Secure the cable harness 
with tie wraps and secure the ca- 
ble harness to the Lawn Ranger's 
chassis. Make sure all external 
cables from the motors, elec- 
tronic control panel, bumper 
switch, and grass sensors are 
connected properly. 

Control-system test 

Remove all input power and in- 
sert the power board into J21 on 
the motherboard. Repeat the test 
procedure that was Just de- 
scribed, except measure the DC 
supply voltages at edge connector 
J23 and J22 on the mother- 
board. The supply voltages 
should agree with the values in- 
dicated on the CPU and motor- 
controller board schematics (re- 
fer to Radio -Electronics. June 
and July 1990). If the values are 
correct, remove the input power 
and plug the CPU board in edge- 
connector J23, Reapply the +24- 
volt input power and recheck the 
voltage levels. If all is well, per- 
form the digital-board check-out 
procedure outlined in the June 



CO 

o 

z 
o 

EC 
lU 

_1 

Ui 

g 

< 
DC 



PARTS LIST— POWER BOARD 

All resistors are Vs-wati, 5%, un- 
less otherwise indicated. 

R1-R10, R13-R15, R17, R18, 

R20-R28, R45~-R49— not used 
R11, R44. R50— 3300 ohms 
R1 2— 680,000 Ohms, 6-pln, V'j-watt, 

SIP resistor network 
R16, R19, R32, R43— 0.01 ohm, 

5 watts 
R29— 150.000 ohms 
R30, R31, R34, R35— 270,000 ohms 
R33, R36— 1 megohm 
R3 7— 147,000 Ohms, V4-watt. 1% 
R38— 10,000 ohms, potentiometer 
R39— 82,000 ohms 
R40— 100,000 ohms 
R41— 27,000 ohms 
R42— 22,000 ohms 
R51~R54— 560,000 ohms 
Capacitors 
C1-C5, C7-C13, 016, 017— not 

used 
C6— 1000 |iR 35 volts, axial 

electrolytic 
014, 015, 023-026—0.1 \i.F. 50 volts 
CI 8, 021—100 jjlR 50 volts, radial 

electroiyttc 
019, 020—100 |xR 16 volts, radial 

electrolytic 
022— 220 V.F, 16 volts, radial 

electrolytic 



Semiconductors 

101, 102— not used 

103— LF412N op amp 

D1, D2, D11-D13, D30. D31— not 

used 
D3, D4, D16, D17, D20-D24, 

D33-D38— 1N4001 diode 
D5, D14, D18, Dt9, D32— 1N4148 

diode 
D6, D15— 1N5402 diode 
D7-D10— 1N5256B 30-vo!t Zener 

diode 
D25-D29— 1N4740 10-volt Zener 

diode 
Q1,Q2. Q12— notused 
Q3-Q10, Q13, Q14— IRFZ42 

MOSFET 
Q11, Q15, Q16— 293904 NPN 

transistor 
Other components 
J11 — terminal strip 
RY1— T90N1D12-24 relay (Potter 

Brumfield) 
RY2— 68P-111P-US-DC24 relay 

(Omron) 
F1— SAG 30-amp fast-blow fuse 
F2— 2AG 0.5-amp fast-blow fuse 
MODI— Model DC2-2-24/12, ± 12- 

volt DO converter (Power General) 
M0D2— Model DC2-2-24/15, ± 15- 

volt DC converter (Power General) 
MODI— Model 710, 5-volt DO con- 
verter (Power General) 



Miscellaneous: 3AG fuse holder, 
2AG fuse holder, solder posts for 
the "E" terminals, 18-gauge solid 
insulated wire, 18-gauge stranded 
insulated wire, solder, etc, 

Note: The following equipment 
can be purchased from Tech- 
nical Solutions, Inc., P.O. Box 
284. Damascus. MD 20872 
(301-253-4933): etched and 
drilled PC boards for CPU 
Board, Motor Controller Board, 
Power Board, and Motherboard, 
S39 each: programmed EPROM, 
$39: grass sensors, $8.99 each; 
hand-held manual controller kit, 
$39; full kit for CPU Board. $129 
(PC board, EPROM, all parts); 
full kit for Motor Controller 
Board, $169 (PC board and all 
parts); full kit for Motherboard, 
$69 (PC board and all parts); 
Power Board kit (PC board, and 
all parts except DC/DC convert- 
ers), $149; Detailed drawing 
package, $79; Lawn Ranger 
demo videotape and information 
package, $19; complete elec- 
tronic kit with everything men- 
tioned above, $777. Please add 
$8.00 for S/H for all orders. Mary- 
land residents add sales tax. 



56 



issue while the boards are 
plugged into the motherboard. 

Now plug the motor-controller 
board into J22 on the mother- 
board. Also, plug the grass-sen- 
sor connector (Jl) into the motor- 
controller board. Reapply the 
-l-24-volt input power to the 
power board. 

If you have an oscilloscope, ver- 
ify that a 5-volt 10-kHz square 
wave is found at the following 
points; J22-34, Jl-1 through 
Jl-15, and J22-2 through 
J22-16. The square wave is a gat- 
ing pulse created by the CPU 
board which is used to turn the 
grass sensors on and off. The gat- 
ing technique is used in order to 
conserve battery power and ex- 
tend the life of the grass sensors. 
If you don't have a scope. Use an 
AC voltmeter to read the voltage 
levels at those points. The square 
wave should create a reading of 
approximately 4.5-volts AC. If the 
square wave is not there, you 
should read volts on the AC volt- 
meter 

Now it is time to check the 
Pulse Width Modulator (PWM) 
circuitry. Plug the hand-held con- 
troller into J4 on the motor-con- 
troller board. Temporarily 
Jumper J22-40 to ground. Tlirn 
the steering control knob ( the po- 
tentiometer on the hand-held 
controller) counterclockwise un- 
til you see a 30-volt square wave 
at J22-26 (l, rev), JlI-7 (i, motor 
- ), J22-27 <R. FOR), and Jll-9 (r. 
MOTOR +}. If you don't have a 
scope, an AC voltmeter should 
give you a reading of to 35,5 
volts AC, depending upon the 
knob setting. Test points J22-25 
(l. for] and J22-28 (r. rev) 
should read volts. 

The "left wheel reverse" (l. rev) 
and "right wheel forward" (r. for) 
signals become active since the 
Lawn Ranger has been com- 
manded to turn to the left. If the 
steering knob is turned clock- 
wise, the robot circuitry will be 
commanded to turn to the right. 
That causes J22-25, Jll-6, 
J22-28, and Jll-10 to become ac- 
tive with the 30-volt PWM square 
wave, and J22-26 and J22-27 to 
read 0-volts DC. If the steering 
knob is centered, J22-25, Jll-6, 
J22-27. and J 1 1-9 will be enabled 
and a voltmeter placed at J22-28 
and J22-26 will read volts since 
the robot has been commanded 
to steer straight. 



TABLE 1— SUPPLIERS 



Manufacturer 


Description 


Model # 


Gtty 


Motor Products Owosso 
201 S. Deiany Rd. 
Owosso, Ml 48867 
(517) 725-5151 


cutting motors, 3,000 
RPM (a 80 oz-in 
torque, 24 volt DC 


LES-25A 


2 


RAE Corporation 
5801 West Elm St, 
McHenry, IL 60050-7480 
(800) 323-7049 


drive motors, 187 
RPM (« 30 in-lb 
torque, 24 volt DC 


P-20705 


2 


McMaster-Carr 
PO. Box 440 
New Brunswick, NJ 
08903-0440 
(201)329-3200 


slip joint hinge (for 
plastic top) 

rubber sheet (for iront 
of plastic top) Vw" 

yoke ends 

ball joints 


1606A41 

8635K1 1 

6071 K1 2 
6072K35 


1 

1 

4 
4 


Stock Drive Products 
2101 Jericho Pike 
New Hyde Park, NY 11040 
(51 6) 328-0200 


timing pulley 
liming belt 


6A4-14DF0 
6R4-08005 


2 
1 


General Battery 
RO. Box 1425 
Reading, PA 1961 2-4205 
(215) 378-0500 


lead-acid battery 


22NF 


2 


Tape Switch 
lOOSchmitt Blvd. 
Farmingdale, NY 11735 
(516) 694-6312 


bumper switch, 8 oz 


102-BPH 


1 


Agri-Fab 

303 W. Raymond 
Sullivan, IL 61951 
(217) 728-4334 


drive wheels 
drive gear 


3108-148 
2692-006 


2 

2 ' 


Colson 

3700 Airport Rd. 
Jonesboro, AR 72401 
(800) 643-551 5 


Caster Wheels 


2-6056-45 


2 I 


Power General 
RO. Box 189 
Canton. MA 02021 
(617) 828-6216 


+ 5 volt DC 
+ 30 volt DC 
± 1 2 volt DC 


710 

002-2-24/ 
DC2-2-24/ 


4 

1 


Pioneer 

9100GaltherRd. 
Gaithersburg, MD 20877 
(301)921-0660 


E-terminals 


160-2085-02-01 


30 


Tec hnt- edge 
389 Liberty St. 
Ferry, NJ 07643-1008 
(201) 641- ///6 


hook blade 


TE-28 


6 



Control panel test 

Disconnect J 11-2, Jll-6, Jll-7. 
Jll-9, and Jll-10 on the terminal 
block. Ensure that the cable from 
the electronic control panel is 
connected to J5 on the CPU 
board and that the batteries are 
connected to Jll-4 and Jll-5 on 
the power board. Tlirn the igni- 



tion key; the red power-on LED 
should begin to Hash. This indi- 
cates that power has been 
switched on to all circuits. Push 
the STOP button. The Lawn 
Ranger should turn ofL Check 
that the cutting-motor connec- 
tion J 11-2 is still disconnected. 
Turn the ignition key again and 



lOHMWUALCOtfmOL-* 




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I 



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TTVYY R 



Tr-JT 



BOARD 






5 e T I a -"ill 11 II la i< <s it i7 18 



i 



I I [ 



_BD6 



DIGITAL 






A A /\ A /\ x\ / ,. y\ 

/[N /K y^ yK /]\ ^ /K /K ^N - 



i.i 



1 



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tranrS' 



6 6 6 6 
7 5« S; StU Sfl Sli S13 £1< Sli St6 

to 

SWSS SENSOfS 



FIG. 5— WIRING DIAGRAM FOR THE CHASSIS. UselS-gauge stranded wire lor any high- 
current connections. 



then push the cut button. The 
voltage at Jll-2 should now read 
-l-30-volts DC. Press the bumper 
switch and the Lawn Ranger 
should turn itself off. TLirn the 
unit on again and push the run 
button. J23-40 (stop move) 
should now read + 10-volts DC. 
Reconnect the motor wires to 



Jll-6, Jll-7, Jll-9, and Jll-10 
on the terminal block. 

Drive-motor test 

Make sure that the hand-held 
controller is connected to J4 on 
the motor-controller board, and 
that everything is connected on 
the terminal block J 11 except for 



g 
z 
o 
cc 
I- 
o 
tu 
_J 

UJ 

6 

Q 



58 

u 




8 INCHES 



CPU BOARD COMPONENT SIDE AT HALF SIZE. 



Jll-2 (cutting motors). TUm the 
ignition key (the power LED 
should be flashing), and turn the 
steering knob to its. centered po- 
sition. Squeeze the hand switch 
on the manual controller. Both 
rear drive motors and wheels 
should be spinning forward. 
Push the REVERSE button. The 
wheels should slowly stop and 
then turn in reverse. Turn the 
steering knob and observe the 
drive wheels as they change 
speed for steering. Release the 
hand switch and the Lawn 
Ranger will turn itself off 

Cutting-motor test 

WITHOUT THE CUTTING 
BLADES ATTACHED TO THE 
CUTTING DISKS, reconnect the 
cutting motor wire to Jll-2. Put 
the Lawn Ranger on a flat level 
hard surface, and keep the cut- 
ting deck area free of obstruc- 
tions. With your hands away 
from the cutting deck area, push 
the CUT button; the cutting disks 
will begin to spin. Push the stop 
button; the cutting disks should 
stop within three seconds. If the 
continued on page 70 



BUILD R-E's 

DIGITAL 

DASHBOARD 



OUR DIGITAL GAUGE STORY BEGAN IN 

the JuJy issue; this month we will 
build all of them. Note that in all 
of the parts lists, except for the 
displays, the part number for the 
fiJD converter (IC2) was listed 
incorrectly. It should be a 
CA3162E, as shown in the sche- 
matics — speaking of which, the 
captions for Figs. 4 and 6 should 
be reversed. 
Construction 

Each digital gauge is built 
using two different PC boards. 
The display board contains the 
seven-segment displays along 
with the driver components, as 
well as the annunciator light bar. 
The main board contains the A/D 
converter, all input circuitry, and 
the 5-voit regulator. 

The boards are mounted one 
on top of another, separated by 
standoffs. A typical gauge is 
shown in Fig. 8. With the display 
board facing toward you, the 
main board is mounted directly 
behind it, with its components 
also facing toward you. Electrical 
connections from board to board 
are made using short pieces of 
bare wire between matching 
pads on both boards, A piece of 9- 
conductor ribbon cable can be 
used instead. Once assembled, 
the boards can be folded apart to 
allow for easy testing, trou- 
bleshooting, or calibrating. 

Each gauge uses either a two- 
or three-digit display board. Ta- 
ble 1 shows which boards are to 
be used with each gauge. When 
stuffing the three digit display 
board, begin with Rl and R2 as 
shown in Fig. 9, and install R3 
only if the board is to be used 
with the voltage gauge, as R3 
supplies power to the decimal 
point. Install DISP1-DISP3 and 



Update your dashboard 

with six accurate, 

good-lool<ing 

gauges. 



ROSS ORTMAN 




LEDl, keeping them flat against 
the board, and then install 
Q1-Q3. The transistors must be 
installed to a height just below 
the height of the displays. Using 
a good silicone sealant or other 
similar glue, secure a pho- 
tographic legend or some other 
form of annunciator lettering to 
the LED light bar. If the two-digit 
display board is to be used, in- 
stall everything in the same man- 
ner as the three digit board, but 
use only DISPl and DISP2. and 
Ql and Q2 (see Fig. 10). 

Although the use of sockets is 
normally recommended, ICl 
must be kept below the height of 
the seven-segment displays. 
Therefore, ICl must be soldered 
directly to the board. Be careful 
when soldering the IC. 

Referring to Table 1, note that 
the same main board is used for 
the voltage, oil-pressure, water- 
temperature, and miscellaneous 
temperature gauges. However, 
the actual components soldered 
to the board arc different for each 
gauge, and not all PC pads are 



used on all boards. Install only 
the components specified in each 
parts-placement diagram. 

Figure 11 shows the compo- 
nent placement for the voltage 
gauge. Solder the parts to the 
board in smallest-to-largest 
order, clipping and saving the 
leads. The parts-placement di- 
agram for the oii-pressure gauge 
is shown in Fig. 12, the water- 
temperature gauge in Fig. 13. 
and the miscellaneous tempera- 
ture gauge in Fig. 14. 



V. 

IT 
T 

IT 


n 

3 
I 





FIG. 8— THE BOARDS ARE MOUNTED 
one on top of another, separated with 
standoffs. A typical gauge is shown here. 



FROM GAUGE 

FIG. 10— THE TWO-DIGIT DISPLAY 
BOARD is the same as the three-digit 
board, but uses only DI5P1 and DISP2 



The fuel gauge and vacuum 
gauge each has its own main 
board. Figure 15 shows the parts- 
placement diagram for the fuel 
gauge, and Fig. 16 for the vac- 
uum gauge. Note that the re- 
sistors and diodes on the fuel- 
and vacuum-gauge main boards 
must be installed standing on 



Digital 
Gauge 


TABLE 1 

Main 
Board 


Display Board 


Voltmeter 
Oil Pressure 
Water Temp 
Misc Temp 
Fuel 
Vacuum 


43B21 
43B21 
43B21 
43B21 
43B20 
43B17 


43B15 3-digit 
43B16 2-digit 
43B15 3-digit 
43B15 3-digit 
43B16 2-drgit 
43B1 6 2-digit 



CO 

Q 
z 
o 
a: 

5 



o 

Q 
< 

EC 




FROM GAUGE 



FIG. 9— WHEN STUFFING THE THREE- 
dlgit display board, install R3 only if the 
board is to be used with the voltage 
gauge. Otherwise it is not used. 



end. Be sure to observe the polar- 
ity of the diodes. 

After all of the components are 
installed on each board, solder a 
red wire containing a fuse holder 
and fuse into its respective hole. 
A black ground wire is soldered 
into the hole next to the power 
wire. 

The oil-pressure, water-tem- 
perature, and fuel gauges all need 
one sender wire attached to the 
main board. Cut a 4- inch piece of 
wire and solder one end to the 
main-board location marked P2, 
"sender," and be sure to put it in 
the hole that is farthest from the 
upper-right-hand corner of the 
board. Next, crimp on a '/4-inch 
female solderless terminal to the 
other end of the wire. You will 



then need an appropriate length 
of wire that will run out to the 
actual sender, and you should 
crimp on a 'A-inch male sol- 
derless terminal to one end, and 
set it aside for now. 

The miscellaneous tempera- 
ture gauge will need both a send- 
er wire and a ground return wire. 
Install the sender wire as pre- 
viously described, and cut a 4" 
piece of black wire to be soldered 
into the hole just above the send- 
er wire. A '/4-inch male solderless 
terminal goes on the end of the 
ground return wire. 



-12V 




TO 3-niGIT DISPLAV 



FIG. 11— VOLTAGE GAUGE parts place- 
ment. Solder the parts to the board in 
smallest-to-largest order, clipping and 
saving the leads. 



VOLTAGE GAUGE 
All resistors are 'A-watt, 5%, un- 
less otherwise indicated. 

R1-R10, RIS-RI'^ — not used 

R11— 10,000 ohms, PC-mounted 
trimmer potentiometer 

R15— 100,000 ohms 

R16— 1000 ohms 

R17— 50.000 ohms, PC-mounted 
trimmer potentiometer 

Capacitors 

CI — 47 ixF, 25 volts, electrolytic 

02, 05— 10 iiF, 35 volts, electrolytic 

03, 04 — not used 

06—0.33 \3.F. 50 volts, stacl<ed film 

Semiconductors 

IC1— LM340T-5, 5-volt regulator 

102— CA3162E, A/D converter 

D1, D2—1N4002 diode 

Miscellaneous: 43B21 main PC 
board, 3-digit display board, in-line 
fuse holder, 1-amp fuse, four 6-32 
X 0.625" standoffs, eight ^'k-inch 
#6 screws, t>ronze or red plex- 
iglass, mounting hardware, hookup 
wire 



62 



. + 12V 



SENQERq 




TD 2-DIGIT DlSPLftY 



FIG. 12— OIL-PRESSURE GAUGE parts- 
placement. 



OIL-PRESSURE GAUGE 
All resistors are V4-watt, 5%, un- 
less otherwise indicated. 

R1^70 Ohms 

R2-R8, RIO, R12-R16— not used 

R9— 100,000 ohms 

R11— 10,000 ohms, PC-mounted 
trimmer potentiometer 

R1 7— 50.000 ohms, PC-mounted 
trimmer potentiometer 

Capacitors 

CI— 47 |xF, 25 volts, electrolytic 

C2, C3, C4— 10 ^F, 35 volts, elec- 
trolytic 

05 — not used 

C6-^.33 liF, 50 volts, stacked film 

Semiconductors 

IC1— LM340T-5, 5-volt regulator 

102— CA3136E, A'D converter 

D1, D2—1N4002 diode 

Miscellaneous: 43B21 main PC 
board, 15G5 oil-pressure sender, 2- 
digit display board, in-line luse 
holder, 1-amp fuse, four 6-32 x 
0.625" standoffs, eight Vis-inch #6 
screws, bronze or red plexiglass, 
mounting hardwfare, hookup v/ire 



The main boards are now ready 
to be connected to the display 
boards. The first step is to place 
the four standoffs tietween the 
boards and secure them with 
eight Yie-inch #6 screws. Assem- 
ble the boards with the foil side of 
the display board facing the com- 
ponent side of the main board. 
The holes for the board-to-board 
connecting wire should line up 
on the same edge. After the two 
boards are secured to each other, 
lay the assembly face down and 
begin inserting pieces of bare 
wire or scraps of component 



leads through the holes in the 
main board and down into the 
respective holes in the display 
board. After a few wires have 
been inserted, solder the connec- 
tions. Continue until all nine 
wires have been installed. 

The temperature probe for the 
miscellaneous temperature 
gauge is constructed from the 
1N4148 diode, a lO-foot length of 
coax cable, and a male and female 
crimp-on connector On one end 



SENDER, 




4, i- 



TO 3-DIGIT OlSPLAV 

FIG. 13— WATER-TEMPERATURE gauge 
parts placement. 



WATER-TEMPERATURE GAUGE 
All resistors are Vi-watt, 5%, un- 
less otherwise indicated. 

R1— 100 ohms, '/2-watt 

R2^t30,000 ohms 

R3, R7— 10,000 Ohms, PO-mounted 
trimmer potentiometer 

R4, R8— 22,000 ohms 

R5, R9. R11-R16— not used 

R6— 470,000 Ohms 

RIO— 2200 Ohms 

R17— 50,000 ohms, PC-mounted 
trimmer potentiometer 

Capacitors 

C1— 47 (J.F, 25 volts, electroiytic 

C2, C5— 10 iiF, 35 volts, electroiytic 

C3, 04— not used 

06-^.33 jxF, 50 volts, stacked film 

Semiconductors 

D1. D2—1N4002 diode 

101— LM340T-5, 5-volt regulator 

102— OA3136E, AD converter 

Miscellaneous: 43B21 main PC 
board, 14G11 water-temperature 
sender, 3-digit display board, in- 
line fuse holder, 1-amp fuse, four 
6-32 X 0.625" standoffs, eight Vw- 
inch #6 screws, bronze or red plex- 
iglass, mounting hardware, hookup 
wire. 




in 3-DlBlT DISPLAV 



FIG. 14— MISCELLANEOUS temperature 
gauge parts placement. 



MISCELLANEOUS 
TEMPERATURE GAUGE 
All resistors are Vo-watt, 5%, un- 
less otherwise indicated. 

R1-R4, R9, RIO, R15, R16— not used 

R5— 2200 ohms 

R6--6800 Ohms 

R7 — 1000 ohms, PC -mounted trim- 
mer potentiometer 

R8— 470 ohms 

R11— 10,000 ohms, PC-mounted 
trimmer potentiometer 

R1 2— 10,000 ohms 

R13— 1000 ohms 

R14— 220 ohms 

R17— 50,000 ohms, PC-mounted 
trimmer potentiometer 

Capacitors 

C1^7 fxF, 25 volts, electrolytic 

C2, C5— 10 11.F, 35 volts, electrolytic 

03, C4— not used 

06—0.33 jaF, 50 volts, stacked film 

Semiconductors 

!C1— LM340T-5, 5-volt regulator 

IC2— CA3162E, A/D converter 

D1, D2—1N4002 diode 

Miscellaneous: 43B21 main PC 
board, 1N4148 diode for tempera- 
ture probe, 3-digit display board, 
coax cable, in-line fuse holder, 1- 
amp fuse, four 6-32 x 0.625" 
standoffs, eight yis-inch #6 
screws, bronze or red plexiglass, 
mounting hardware, hookup wire. 

of the coax cable, strip off about 
%-inch of the outer insulation, 
unbraid the outer conductor, and 
twist toward one side. Next, strip 
about '/i-lnch of the cables inner 
insulation. 

Position the 1N4148 diode so 
that the band, or cathode, is 
touching the outer conductor of 



CO 



m 

S 

U3 

m 

-.1 
c 



6S 



the coax cable. The diode will lay 
right against the inner-conduc- 
tor insulation. Very carefully sol- 
der both sides of the diode, the 
cathode side to the outer conduc- 
tor and the anode side to the in- 
ner conductor. After clipping the 
excess lead length, coat the diode 
and exposed wires with a good 
quality epoxy or sealer. Apply sev- 
eral coats to ensure a good seal. 
Only the end of the cable with the 
diode is coated. On the other end 
of the cable, strip and separate 
the inner and outer conductors. 
Crimp the male terminal to the 
center conductor and the female 
terminal to the shield. 

The solid-state vacuum sensor 
is mounted to the vacuum gauge 
by first removing the two screws 
near 1C3 that hold the main 
board to the standoffs. Place the 
sensor bracket on the back side 
of the main board and align the 
holes on the two tabs with the 
board mounting holes and rein- 
sert the two screws (see Fig. 17). 
Next, insert the sensor leads into 
the main board with the lettering 
on the sensor body facing away 
from the bracket. Insert the re- 
maining hardware and tighten 
the sensor to the bracket. Do not 
overtighten the mounting screws 
as you damage the sensor It is a 
good idea to only hand tighten 
the screws and apply a small drop 
of glue to keep them from coming 
loose. Very carefully solder the 
leads of the sensor to the board, 
working from the back side of the 
board. Be careful not to melt the 
case of the sensor with the solder- 
ing iron. 

Calibration 

After the gauges are completely 
assembled, turn all the calibra- 
tion potentiometers to the center 
of their rotation. Next, connect 
each gauge to a 12-volt DC power 
supply or battery. At this point. 
all the display digits should light 
as should the LED light bar. 

The cEilibration process for all 
of the digital gauges begins with 
zeroing the AT) converter. To do 
g that, pins 10 and 11 of the 
z CA3162E A/D converter must be 
§ shorted together. Use a small 
Q screwdriver or jumper wire. Once 
y connected, the display should 
^ now read zero or very close to it. 
Q Adjust the zero calibration poten- 
g tiometer (see each schematic for 



+ 12V 



SENDER 




I CI 




D1 

d;>»* qpp cfp y 

fll^ I 1 t 1 — ■ — ■ 1 ' « 



(PI ' 

il 



, R16 ma HM 4m V ^ ij ^ ■ & 







TO 2-DIGIT DISPLAY 
FIG. 15— PARTS-PLACEMENT DIAGRAM 
for the fuel gauge. 

FUEL GAUGE 
All resistors are yj-watt, 5%, un- 
less otherwise indicated. 

RI— 470 ohms 

R2, R5. RIO, R12, R14, R15, R16— 
100,000 Ohms 

R3— 33,000 ohms 

R4— 47,000 Ohms 

R6 — 1 .8 megohms 

R7, R19— 100.000 ohms, PC- 
mounted trimmer potentiometer 

R8— 10,000 ohms, PC-mounled 
trimmer potentiometer 

R9— 200.000 ohms, PC-mounted 
trimmer potentiometer 

R11— 2700 ohms 

R13— 8200 Ohms 

R17— 22,000 ohms 

R18— 1000 ohms 

R20— 470,000 ohms 

R21— 50,000 ohms, PC-mounted 
trimmer potentiometer 

R22— -2200 ohms 

Capacitors 

CI — 47 ^l.F, 25 volts, electrolytic 

C2, C3— 10 ^xF. 35 volts, electrolytic 

C4— 0.33 (j,F, 50 volts. Stacked film 

Semiconductors 

IC1— LM340T5, 5-vott regulator 

IC2 — LM324, quad op-amp 

IC3— CA3162E, AJD converter 

D1,D2—1N4002 diode 

Miscellaneous: 43B20 main PC 
board, 2-digit display board, 0.1" 3- 
conductor header, 2-conductor 
jumper, in-line fuse holder, i-amp 
fuse, four 6-32 x 0.625" standoffs, 
eight yt6-inch #6 screws, bronze or 
red plexiglass, mounting hardware, 
hookup wire. 



exact potentiometer number) so 
that the display reads "000" or 
"00," Then remove the jumper. 
The voltage gauge is calibrated 



by connecting a good quality 
bench voltmeter across the power 
supply that is used to power the 
gauge. Carefully adjust Rll, the 
gain adjust potentiometer, so the 
reading is the same as the read- 
ing on your bench voltmeter. 

The calibration process for the 
oil- pressure gauge requires con- 
necting a precision 47-ohm re- 
sistor to the sensor lead and 



+ 1ZV 



O 



1C3 






•m^ 



D2 CI + 

n t * c'l L-jEr;] RI , , 



^ r 

rb] [rb r 



IC2 



rSro 



"b"'' r izT 1 7 d" 

Hi 



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NK Sf^ ^^^ n1^ Nl/' Sk\t^^ 



TO 2-DIGtT DISPLAY 

FIG. 16— PARTS-PLACEMENT DIAGRAM 
FOR THE vacuum gauge. 

VACUUM GAUGE 
All resistors are y4-watt, 5%, un- 
less otherwise indicated. 

RI, R2— 10,000 ohms 

R3, R8— 100,000 ohms 

R4— 22,000 ohms 

R5— 1000 ohms 

R6~-680,000 ohms 

R7, RIO— 200,000 ohms PC 
mounted trimmer potentiometer 

R9— 82,000 ohms 

R11— 50,000 ohms PC mounted 
trimmer potentiometer 

R12— 2200 ohms 

Capacitors 

CI —47 M-F, 25 volts, electrolytic 

C2, C3— 10 fiF 35 volts, electrolytic 

C4— 0.33 jjlF 50 volts, stacked film 

Semiconductors 

IC1— Sensym SX30DN vacuum sen- 
sor (Dakota Digital #69G18 in- 
cludes mounting bracket) 

IC2— LIVI324, quad op-amp 

IC3— LI^340T-5, 5-volt regulator 

IC4— CA3162E, A'D converter 

D1, D2—1N4002 diode 

Miscellaneous: 43B17 main PC 
board. 2-digit display board, in-line 
fuse holder, 1-amp fuse, four 6-32 
X 0.625" standoffs, eight Vie-lnch 
#6 screws, bronze or red plex- 
iglass, mounting hardware, hookup 
wire. 



64 



carefully adjusting Rll so the 
reading is at "47," Actually, any 
resistor between 33 and 91 ohms 
can be used to calibrate the unit. 
Just set the display to coincide 
with the value of the resistor. 

The water- temperature gauge 
is calibrated by connecting the 
sending unit and adjusting for 
freezing and boiling tempera- 
tures. First, prepare a bowl of 
water with several ice cubes in it, 
and a pot of boiling water. Place 
the sending unit in the boiling 
water with its base submerged in 
the water and the terminal above 
the water line. After waiting 
about a minute for the sending 
unit to stabilize, adjust the "high 
adjust" potentiometer (R7) for a 
reading of "212" on the display. 
Next, place the sending unit in 
the ice water using the same pre- 
cautions not to let the center ter- 
minal come in contact with the 
water. Wait a minute for the send- 
ing unit to stabilize and adjust 
the "low adjust" potentiometer 
(R3) for a reading of "032" on the 
display. Repeat the high- and low- 
adjustment procedures until a 
good balance has been reached. 

To calibrate the fuel gauge, you 
must determine the empty and 
full resistance of your vehicle's 
sender For most Fords, its 73 
ohms empty to 10 ohms full. GM 
vehicles run from ohms empty 
to 90 ohms full, and AMC, ma- 
rine, and most aftermarkel send- 
ers use the scale of 244 ohms full 
to 33 ohms empty. The calibra- 
tion range of our fuel gauge will 
easily accept the input from vir- 
tually any brand of sending unit. 

Obtain two resistor values that 
are very close to the empty and 
full resistances of the sending 
unit that will be used. If your sys- 
tem requires you to use the "A" 
circuit, you will begin calibrating 
the fuel gauge by first turning R9 
fully counterclockwise. Be sure 
the jumper is in the "A" position. 
With the "empty" resistance con- 
nected to the lead wire , adjust R7 
for a reading between "00" and 
"05." Because the gauge has a 
large RC circuit for averaging, al- 
low plenty of time for the reading 
to settle. Next, connect the "full" 
resistance and adjust R9 for a 
reading between "95" and "99." It 
is usually better to have some 
headroom to avoid over-range 
and under-range conditions due 
to sending-unit tolerance. After 



P0RT2(P2[ 



BRACKET 

n 



SCREW 
6-32 X .2ft" 




j^PORTKPll 
SENSOP LETTERING 



SCREW 6-32 X .625 



"tCl (SENSOR) 

MAIN BOARD 
t 



^V COMPONENT SIDE 

lb 

DISPUV BOARD 
.^ 

FIG. 17— PLACE THE SENSOR BRACKET 
on the back side ol the main board and 
align the holes on the two tabs with the 
board mounting holes. 

the empty and full settings are 
adjusted, repeat the two steps 
until a good balance has been 
reached. 

If the "B" circuit is being used, 
begin the procedure by turning 
R19 fully clockwise. Connect the 
"empty" resistance and adjust R8 
for a reading of "00" to "05" on 
the display. Reconnect to the 
"full" resistance and adjust R19 
for a reading between "95" and 
"99." Repeat the two steps until a 
good balance has be obtained. 

The calibration procedures for 
the miscellaneous temperature 
gauge are almost identical to the 
water-temperature gauge. Pre- 
pare a bow! of water wi th several 
ice cubes and a pot of boiling 
water. Place the temperature pro- 
be in the boiling water, wait 30 
seconds for it to stabilize, and ad- 
just Rll for a reading of "212" on 
the display. Next, place the send- 
ing unit in the ice water Wait an- 
other 30 seconds for the sending 
unit to stabilize, and adjust the 
"low adjust" potentiometer (R7) 
for a reading of "032" on the dis- 
play. Repeat the high- and low- 
adjustment procedures until a 
good balance has been reached. 

The calibration process for the 
vacuum gauge begins by turning 
RIO fully clockwise and adjusting 
R7 for a reading of "00" on the 
display. That zeros the offset of 
the pressure/ vacuum sending 
unit. Next, connect a piece of %4- 
inch vacuum line to P2 (port 2) 
on the sending unit. The other 
end must go to an accurate vac- 
uum source that you will use as a 
standard for full-scale calibration 
of the vacuum gauge. The vac- 
uum source can be a hand-held 



3-DIGIT DISPLAY BOARD 
Ail resistors are y4-watt, 5%, un< 
less otherwise indicated. 

R1, R2— 220 ohms 

R3— 220 ohms (voltmeter only) 

Semiconductors 

1C1— CA3161E, Display driver 

D1SP1-DISP3— 0.43" 7-segment 
C.A. LED display {Panasonic 
LN514RA) 

Q1-Q3~-2N3906 PNP transistor 

LED1— 5- X 15-mm LED, {Pan- 
asonic LN0202RP) 

2-DIGIT DJSPLAY BOARD 
All resistors are V^t-watt, 5%, un- 
less otherwise indicated. 

R1, R2— 220 Ohms 
Semiconductors 

ICI— CA3161E, display driver 
DiSPI, DISP2— 0.43" 7-segment 
C.A, LED display (Panasonic 
LN514RA) 
Q1, Q2— 2N3906 PNP transistor 
LED1— 5- X 15-mm LED, (Pan- 
asonic LN0202RP) 

Note: The following items are 
available from Dakota Digital, 
11301 Kuhle Drive, Sioux Falls, 
SO 57107 (605) 332-6513: a PC- 
board set for each gauge (in- 
cludes main PC board and dis- 
play board) is $6.95. A parts kit 
for each gauge (includes PC 
boards, components, and man- 
ual) Is $29.95. Each gauge as- 
sembled and tested is $39.95. 
Stock numbers are as follows: 
voltage-gauge kit #2005-KIT, as- 
sembled and tested #3005- 
UNtT; oil-pressure gauge kit 
#2006-KIT, assembled and test- 
ed #3006-UNIT (order oil-pres- 
sure sender separately); water- 
temperature gauge kit #2007- 
KIT, assembled and tested 
#3007-UNIT (order water-tem- 
perature sender separately); 
miscellaneous temperature 
gauge kit #2008-KIT, assembled 
and tested #3008-UN1T; fuel- 
gauge kit #2Q09-KIT, assembled 
and tested #3009-UNIT; vac- 
uum-gauge kit #2010-KIT, as- 
sembled and tested #3010-UNIT 
(order vacuum sensor sepa- 
rately). Oil-pressure sender 
(#15G5), $15.50; water-tempera- 
ture sender (#14G11), $5.50; vac- 
uum sensor (#69G18), $19.95; 
RCA CA3161E driver (#69016), 
$1.95; RCA CA3162 A/D convert- 
er {#69015), $7.95, All orders 
add 4% shipping and handling 
{$1.50 minimum). Visa and Mas- 
tercard accepted. 



I .• 



ir. 

rr 

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a 

rr 



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o 

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vacuum pump that has an accu- 
rate dial gauge, or you can con- 
nect the vacuum gauge and an 
automotive tune-up vacuum 
gauge to a running engine and 
use Its reading as your standard. 
Once a known amount of vac- 
uum is connected to the vacuum 
gauge, adjust RIO for a full-scale 
reading. 

Installation 

A good enclosure will protect 
the units from shock, dirt, and 
shorting. The enclosure must 
also have a front panel that will 
enhance the viewing of the dis- 
plays. That is especially impor- 
tant for bright days, where bare 
LED displays can be very difficult 
to read. 

The digital gauges can be 
mounted by the same bolts that 
hold the two boards together. 
That allows the point of mount- 
ing to be from the front or back of 
the unit. For rear mounting, the 
screws that hold the main board 
to the spacers are removed. From 
here, additional spacers are used 
to mount the unit to a panel lo- 
cated behind the digital gauge. 
The length of the spacers will de- 
pend on how far the mounting 
panel is from the front panel. The 
unit can also be mounted directly 
to the front panel by removing 
the screws holding the display 
board to the spacers. Here again, 
additional spacers will be used to 
keep the unit away from the front 
panel and provide a secure 
mounting. If mounted from the 
front panel, use an attractive 
screw that will enhance the look 
of the front panel. Hex-head 
screws, Allen screws, or Torx 
screws can be used. As with any 
type of enclosure, you will also 
need to drill or cut vent holes to 
allow heat to escape. 

For the front panel, bronze or 
smoked plexiglass is recom- 
mended. That material is not 
only durable, but it will also keep 
outside light from shining into 
the display area and allow the 
LED's to shine through, thus 
creating a more visible and reada- 
ble display. Red filter plexiglass 
will also work well as long as only 
red LED's are used. The front 
panel should be masked to allow 
only the LEDs and annunciator 
to show, thus hiding the rest of 
the display board. Masking can 
be done by taping over the area 







j S^^tf 



f* 1 '3/16 INCHES »-| 

VOLTS, OIL, WATER, AND MISC. TEMP. 




H ^fU^^H* 



-1"/ibINCHES- 



2-DIGIT DISPLAY SOLDER SIDE. 



t^^»^ 




SIDE 



o e J e e [* 

1 1 1 Mt • • • • ^B 



-1"/i6 INCHES - 



VACUUM GAUGE FOIL PATTERN. 



|_ — 43B16 

|-* 1"/is INCHES —^ 

2-DIGIT DISPLAY COMPONENT SIDE. 







\* 1'3/i6 INCHES ^ 

SOLDER SIDE OF THE FUEL GAUGE. 



4-3B20 ^^9 

COMP f Oi 
SIDE ol 

ooe^-o »>j» 



^0 a o o tt a a e 

•••««oato ' 





3-DIGIT DISPLAY SOLDER SIDE. 

r _ _ n 




-1"/i6 INCHES 



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43B:5 



-l^/ia 1NCHES- 



I 



COMPONENT SIDE OF THE FUEL GAUGE. 



3-DIGIT DISPLAY COMPONENT SIDE. 



66 



where the displays will be located 
and painting the uncovered area 
black on the back side. 

Both the oil-pressure gauge 
and the water-temperature gauge 
require sending units to be 
mounted to the engine. The oil- 
pressure sending unit mounts 
directly to the block of the en- 
gine. Its '/s-inch pipe thread fits 
GM motors directly while Ford 
motors, along with some other 
manufacturers using '/j-inch 
thread, will require a 'A- to Vs- 
inch adapter. The water- tempera- 
ture sending unit is made to 
mount directly to the block or 
water pump of a Ford motor 
using standard %-inch pipe 
thread. GM motors will require a 
1/2- to %-inch adapter. Should 
your application be somewhat 
different, adapters and fittings 
can be obtained from your local 
hardware or automotive store. 

You may also wish to keep your 
original gauge or idiot light Ihat 
came factory with your car. That 
can be done in one of two ways. A 
"T" fitting can be used to mount 
both the original sender and the 
new sender. Otherwise you have 
to find another location that is 
occupied by a plug that can be 
replaced with the sending unit. 
That lets you keep the factory 
dashboard functions Intact. 

When connecting the fuel 
gauge to the fuel sender, the easi- 
est method is to find the factory 
wiring harness connection that 
iTjns back to the fuel tank. A sec- 
ond option is to run a new wire. 
The original fuel gauge cannot be 
connected to the same sender 
that the new digital fuel gauge is 
using. The two will interfere with 
each others readings. 

When connecting any of the 
gauges to the motor or fuel tank, 
be sure that the sender has a 
good connection to chassis 
ground. Failure to properly 
ground the gauge or the sender 
will result in erratic or incorrect 
readings. 

The temperature probe for the 
miscellaneous temperature 
gauge can be mounted in one of 
several ways. When monitoring 
air temperature, inside or out. 
the probe should be placed in an 
area where a good average tem- 
perature exists. Inside, that may 
be under the dash, away from 
any heating or coohng vents and 



out of any sunlight. Outside, un- 
der the front grill area of the car 
win provide the most accurate 
point as it is out of the sun and 
not affected too much by engine 
heat. 

If the goal Is to measure the 
temperature of the transmission 
fiuid, engine oil, differential, or 
coolant, mount the sensor in a 
manner that maintains good 
thermal contact to the outer plate 
of the item being monitored. 
Heat sink compound should also 
be used to ensure good thermal 
contact. For example, when 
monitoring oil temperature, 
mount the sensor to the bottom, 
back side of the oil pan, where 
there will be very little air move- 
ment to cool the sensor. 

Remove one of the ol! pan bolts 
and manufacture a bracket that 
will hold the probe to the oil pan. 
This can be a simple piece of alu- 
minum or thin steel cut in such a 
way so when the oil pan bolt is 
inserted through the bracket and 
into the block, the sensor will be 
lightly compressed between the 
bracket and the oil pan. Do not 
make it too tight, as excessive 
pressure on the 1N4148 diode will 
break its glass housing. You may 
want to hold the sensor by the 
cable near the diode to be safe. 
Apply heat sink compound to the 
sensor and the oil pan where con- 
tact Is to be made. Be sure the oil 
pan is free of dirt. Then route the 
coax cable up through the fire- 
wall to the location of the gauge. 

The vacuum gauge is con- 
nected to the intake manifold via 
y64-inch vacuum hose. Run the 
hose through a location in the 
firewall and to the intake man- 
ifold, or vacuum "T" usually lo- 
cated near the rear of the engine 
compartment. Connect the vac- 
uum hose to P2 (port 2) on the 
sending unit. 

Once a suitable panel or en- 
closure has been constructed, 
and the gauges mounted to It. In- 
stall the assembly into the vehicle 
and connect the power to a 
source that is on only when the 
ignition key is in the "on" posi- 
tion. Be sure to secure any hook- 
up wires so Uiey will not present a 
hazard to you or your vehicle. 
Your new digital gauge system is 
now ready to display Important 
vehicle information and keep you 
up to date on Its condition. R-E 



SAME DAY 
SHIPPING 



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B Lighted power swilch 

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RE-PBI 



'26 



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UCTION TO 

CROWAVE 

CH^OLOGY 



LAST MpNTil. WE EXAMINEDn! 

basic concepts of the electromaj 
netic spectrum, some basic pk- 
rametfrs of electromagnetic V 
waves (such as amphtude, fre- 
quency, period, and wavelength), 
and same early methods of RF 
generation, including the spark- 
gap generator, and the 
Barkliausen-Kurz Oscillator or 
BKO. This month, well examine 
some early m icrowave RF sources 
in greater depth, totiyand appre- 
ciate the problems faced by early 
designers. 

p In the early days of radio, the 
term "microwave" meant any- 
thing above about 100 MHz. The 
region above modern CB was 
usually called "UHF." which an 
early textbook referred tojokingly 
as "unbeUevably high frequen- 



Learn about early RF oscillators 
in our continuing series on 
microwave circuits 



ciesv'" Man< 



■ecent European re- 
ceivers mark the FM band 
J. (88-108 MHz) with a "U," after 
>; the German "ultra kurz welle 
• (ultra-short waves). Such earl, 
'''■tlesignations were indicative of 
"the problems of generating R?" 
V,power at such frequencies be- 
^cause of device lin-^tations. 

One of the earliest problems in- 
hibiting full use of the RF spec- 
trum was the inability to gener- 
ate enough RF power at I'requen- 
cies of value. For many years 
generating RF signals at useful 
power levels, was limited to the 
Medium-Firequeucy (MF) band. 
Various problems limited devices 
then in common use. But from 
1920—45. advantage was taken of 
inherent limitations of vacuum 
tubes to enable the generation of 
RF power at higher fre- 
quencies. 

The definition of what 
constitutes high frequen- 
cies has varied according 
to the difficulty of gener- 
ating RF power at those 
ranges. Until the ear- 
ly- 19208. when hams 
opened the HF shortwave 
region (3-30 MHz), com- 
mercial radio used the MF range 
with: X<200 m/cyc, or; /"<L5 
MHz. The technology of that 
period worked well at MP; but its 
effectiveness dropped rapidly 
with increased frequency. 

Even in the early days of radio, 
higher frequencies were exam- 
ined. Early radio pioneer 
Heinrich Herlz, in 1887-88. used 
31.3 MHz-1.25 GHz for short 
range investigations across his 
lab, and 1.25 GHz is a microwave 
frequency even now! Guglielmo 
Marconi used 500 MHz for short- 
range experiments, but switched: 
to MF when he found that towe 
frequencies yielded propagalioi 
over greater distances. 



a 



mm 




Besides the fact that RF was 
easier to generate in this region, 
the detectors of that period 
("Branly coherers," after Prof. 
Edouard Branly) were far more 
sensitive in the MF range. In ad- 
dition, experimenters of the 
period also ran into some real- 
ities of electromagnetic propaga- 
tion. On December 12, 1901 
Marconi and his coworkers 
achieved the first confirmed 
transatlantic transmission, of 
313 kHz from Poldhu, Great Brit- 
ain, to Marconi's receiver at St, 
Johns, Newfoundland, Canada. 
A transmitter power of 10 kW was 
used to achieve that feat. 

Vacuum tubes made possible 
operation on yet higher frequen- 
cies. Commercial, military and 
amateur radio moved to the HF 
shortwave region in the 
mid-1920's. Difficulties with de- 
vices above 25 MHz caused the 
region above modern CB to be 
called "ultra-high frequencies" 
(UHF). Today "UHF" designates 
300-900 MHz. Advances in vac- 
uum tubes during World War II 
allowed practical use of up to 450 
MHz, so the UHF definition was 
changed. 

The three traditional methods 
for generating RF energy were 
spark gaps, Alexanderson alter- 
nators, and vacuum tubes. 

Spark gap generators 

An electric arc produces tre- 
mendous energy at both har- 
monic and non-harmonic spu- 
rious frequencies. For example, 
any AM receiver will pick up noise 
from lightning. Similarly, arcs 
from motors or ignition systems 
also produce large amounts of 
wide-bandwidth RF noise. Figure 
1 shows a simple spark-gap RF 
power generator. Until 1938, 
when they were declared illegal, 
circuits like these were used to 
make crude radio transmitters. 
Some early experimenters stole 




Ford Model-A ignition coils from 
their family car to make spark- 
gap transmitters. Tbday, spark- 
gap RF generators are used for 
medical electrocautery. 

The power for a spark-gap gen- 
erator comes from a high-voltage 
AC power transformer, Tl. The 
secondary voltage is high enough 
to ionize the air between the 
spark gap electrodes. A series- 
resonant LC tank (Ll-a-Cl) picks 
off the RF energy. Unfortunately, 
a spark gap is very wideband; an 
800-kHz spark-gap generator ac- 
tually produces significant power 
levels from 10-3000 kHz, and 
weak harmonics up to the micro- 
wave range. A secondary is 
wound onto LI -a for RF output. 

Figure 2 shows a method used 
in 1930 to generate microwave 
RF up to 75 GHz. A spark gap 
goes inside a cavity acting as a 
resonant tank. A coupling loop 
picks off the RF output, and de- 
livers it to the load. Unfor- 
tunately, spark gaps are very inef- 
ficient. Since their RF power has 
wide bandwidth, only a small 
amount is available over any nar- 
row band approximating a single 



o 

HVAC 


RF 
OLfTPUT' 








] ^1 ' ^ 
1 X COUPLING 
: tsPftRK LOOP 

1 ^ RESOMAffT 




^ CAVITY 







FIG. 1 — A SIMPLE SPARK-GAP RF 
POWER GENERATOR used as a crude 
transmitter; they were declared lllegat in 
t938. 



FIG. 2— A SPARK-GAP TRANSMITTER 
USED IN THE 1930's. The spark gap and 
cavity are a resonant tank, and the coup- 
ling loop picks off the RF. However, band- 
width is very wide, with only a small 
amount oi power per frequency; efficien- 
cy Is under 1% at 75 GHz. 

frequency. Also, as frequency in- 
creases, the power drops dramat- 
ically. At 75 GHz, the efficiency is 
far below 1%, since the majority 
of the RF power is outside the 
microwave range, 

Alexanderson alternators 

The two main problems with 
spark-gap transmitters are lim- 
ited efficiency and spectral pu- 
rity. The Alexanderson alternator 
attempted to overcome those 
problems; it was identical, except 
for the use of rectifiers, to the al- 
ternator on modem cars. A mag- 
net would rotate inside a coil. The 
frequency of the AC generated by 



the stator is related to the 
number of poles on the magnet, 
the number of coil pairs in the 
stator, and the speed of rotation. 
If a magnet were spun at 1 rev/s 
inside a two-pole stator, a 1-Hz 
signal would be generated. By in- 
creasing the number of magnets, 
the number of stator poles, and 
the rotation speed, frequencies 
up to 1 MHz could be generated, 
although most alternators pro- 
duced 30-200 kHz. 

The alternators in communica- 
tions use an electromagnet to 
generate RF. Telegraphy was pos- 
sible, by interrupting the coil 
current with a telegraph key. In 
1916, engineers from the iVaval 
Research Lab (NRL), Wash- 
ington, D.C, used the U.S. Navy 
radio station at Arlington, VA 
(call sign NAA). to produce the 
world's first voice transmission 
over radio. NAA, also known as 
Radio Arlington, had a 100-kW, 
113-kHz alternator, and domi- 
nated voice radio before World 
War I, NAA engineers varied the 
electromagnet current using a 
voice signal, to create AM. Be- 
cause of its low operating fre- 
quency, the Alexanderson alter- 
nator was of limited microwave 
value. 

'Vacuum-tube oscillators 

Although this series is about 
microwave devices, we must take 
a brief look at vacuum tubes, in 
order to imderstand the limita- 
tions and problems of microwave 
oscillators. In 1885. Thomas A. 
Edison noted the Edison effect, 
that a positively charged elec- 
trode inside an evacuated glass 
bulb drew current. In 1905, Alex- 
ander Fleming of Great Br lain 
used that effect to make the diode 
rectifier, using a heated cathode 
to emit electrons, and an anode 
to coUect them. In 1907, Lee De- 
Forest of the U.S. inserted a grid 
to modulate the anode current, to 
make the triode. 

Figure 3 shows the basic tri- 
ode. with cathode, grid, and 
anode. In some models, the cath- 
ode is a direct heater, while here 
it's a hollow tube with indirect 
filament. In either case, the ob- '^ 
ject is to heat the cathode until "^ 
electrons boil off into the sur- E 
rounding volume; a process ro 
called thermionic emission. This 3 
electron cloud is called space S 
charge. A positive anode or plate o 



eg 



placed nearby attracts these elec- 
trons, creating anode current. 

The porous grid is between 
cathode and anode. If the grid is 
negatively biased, it can control 
anode current. If negative 
enough, the anode current goes 
to zero. When V, is superposed on 
Vc. the total grid voltage is 
Vj + Vq. If Vj is negative, the total 
bias increases, so the anode cur- 
rent decreases. Conversely, when 
V| is positive the total bias de- 
creases, so the anode current in- 
creases. Thus, V, modulates the 
anode current. 

Early vacuum tubes were quite 
limited in bandwidth; devices 
that operated above 15 MHz were 
rare. The primaty problems were 
lead inductance, intereiectrode 



o 

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o 

CE 

H 
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LU 



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FIG. 3— THE TRIODE, WITH CATHODE, 
GRID, AND ANODE. The cathode ther- 
mionically emits space charge electrons, 
attracted to the anode as current. Total 
grid voltage Is Vi + Vq, and V, moduiates 
anode current, if V| is negative, bias in- 
creases and anode current decreases, 
and vice-versa. 

capacitance, Gain-Bandwidth 
Product (GBP), transit time/an- 
gle, and intereiectrode spacing. 
Making the electrodes smaller de- 
creases capacitance, but severely 
limits operating power, and was 
deemed useless. Moving the ele- 
ments further apart also de- 
creases capacitance, but in- 
creases transit time. Transit 
time/angle problems occur when 
the time required for electrons to 
pass from cathode to anode ap- 
proximates the signal period. 

The Barkhausen-Kurz 
Oscillators 

An early solution to the band- 
width problem in vacuum tubes 
was to exploit transit time, as in 
the Barkhausen-Kurz Oscillator 
or BKO. The BKO in Fig. 4-a used 
a triode with reversed anode 
bias. The BKO had a cylindrical 
anode, since flat or rectangular 



anodes wouldn't work in BKO 
mode. Both anode and cathode 
were negative, while the grid was 
positive. 

Figure 4-b shows BKO opera- 
tion. Cathode electrons were at- 
tracted by the positive grid 
toward the anode, but its nega- 
tive bias repelled tliem. Since the 
cathode was negative, a similar 
effect occurred there. Electrons 
traveled circularly about the grid, 
with the operating frequency set 
by the rotation rate. Output 
power was taken from the grid, a 
principal limitation of the BKO. 
The small grid size limited RF 
power, so it normally ran white 
hot. 

Other approaches 

Later devices used magnetic 
fields to control current, instead 
of the electric field of the BKO. 
These Included the magnetron, 
an "M-tj'pe" crossed-field device 
invented by Hull in 1921, the par- 




RF 

OUTPUT -ir 



Vsl 



1 -■hr-' 



ELECTRON 

PATH \ -" 



ANODE 




ELECTRON 
SPACE 
CHARGE 



GRID 



CATHODE 



FIG. 4— THE SARKHAUSEN-ffURZ O 
SCILLATOR (BKO) used transit time to in- 
crease bandwidth, in (a), both cathode 
and anode are negative; the grid is 
positive. In {b\, cathode electrons are al- 
ternately attracted toward and repelled 
from the anode, traveling circularly about 
the grid with rotation rate setting operat- 
ing trequency. The small grid porduced 
only limited RF output power, so It ran 
white hot. 

allel-field "O-tjrpe" device inven- 
ted by both the Heii's in 1935. and 
(he Varian brothers in 1939. Next 
month, we'll examine the magne- 
tron in depth. R-E 



LAWN RANGER 



continued from page 58 



cutting disks take too long to 
come up to speed, adjust R38 on 
the power board. If they take too 
long to stop, check relay RY2 and 
resistor R43. Disconnect Jll-2. 

Automatic guidance test 

By blocking grass sensors with 
your fingers or electrical tape, 
you can simulate a grass border 
that the Lawn Ranger can follow. 
As you block different grass sen- 
sors, you can verify that the 
motor controller is working prop- 
erly by observing the drive wheels 
as they change in both speed and 
direction. 

Before turning the Lawn 
Ranger on, ensure that the cut- 
ting blades and disks are discon- 
nected. Place the rear end of the 
unit up on blocks so the wheels 
do not touch the ground. Ensure 
that the grass sensors are not 
blocked by grass or other objects 
and that the manual controller is 
disconnected. Tlirn the ignition 
key clockwise and push the start 
button. The right wheel should 
spin clockwise and the left wheel 
should spin counter clockwise. 
The Lawn Ranger will initiate a 
left turn because it cannot detect 
tall grass. If it were allowed to 
move on the ground, you would 
see it steer to the left in a counter- 
clockwise circle. It would con- 
tinue to move in a circle search- 
ing for tall grass for approximate- 
ly 6 seconds and then turn itself 
off. 

Now it is time to test the full 
range of the steering. Block sen- 
sors 1—8 with electrical tape. Ad- 
just potentiometer R203 as 
described in the July issue. Now, 
Adjust R201 and R202 until both 
wheels spin at the same rate. You 
can calculate wheel speed by 
counting the number of revolu- 
tions that each wheel performs 
within one minute (rpm's). This 
test validates that the Lawn 
Ranger steers straight ahead 
when the grass border is in the 
center of the grass-sensor assem- 
bly (between sensors 8 and 9). 

Clear all the grass sensors so 
they are free of obstructions; the 
Lawn Ranger should return to its 
left turn mode. Now, block sensor 
1, then 2, then 3, and so on, until 
continued on page 79 



70 










GERRY L. DEXTER 

■J««#»S»»" "i****!**- ■•••■•**•* 

'i'Sii'ai jJ^.-.V: S;;.'::*! 



i*«V«*fl««« 1 



*■•«* *4 «>««•• 






AM radio is seeing hard times. 



MOLLY WOULD CRY OUT. "NO, NO. 

McGee — -not the front closet!" 
But Fibber McGee would open 
the door anyway, and there 'd fol- 
low several seconds of crashes, 
bangs, thuimps, and thuds as 
Fibber's famous overstuffed clos- 
et emptied out. The radio au- 
dience loved that, as well as the 
show and its characters. 

Fibber McGee and Molly were 
part of the "Golden Age" of radio 
in the 1930s. 1940s, and early 
1950's. when amplitude modula- 
tion (AM) was king, and Jack 
Armstrong, Gangbusters, 
Gab real Heater, the Lux Radio 
Theater, Edward R, Murrow, and 
hundreds of other shows and per- 
sonalities ruled the airways. It 
was even bigger then than TV is 
now, because there was really no 
competition except movies and 
newspapers. Now, those days are 
gone and AM is seeing hard 
times. The present AM is a far ciy 
from a decade ago. 

The trouble with AM 

Surprisingly, AM's problems 
are only partially due to TV. When 



TV skyrocketed in the 1950s, AM 
radio actually prospered, despite 
a period when it took some 
blows. Once the Top 40 arose, 
with repetitive song cycles, ener- 
getic disc jockeys, time, tempera- 
ture, and contests, AM found its 
fortLmes again. Actually, most of 
AM's troubles come from fre- 
quency modulation (FM) compe- 
tition. AM and FM may both be 
radio, but there are some impor- 
tant differences in the way infor- 
mation is transmitted. 

Both AM and FM transmitters 
radiate "carrier" wave RF, modu- 
lated to contain transmitted in- 
formation. In AM. the carrier 
wave amplitude is proportional 
to the audio amplitude, but the 
carrier fvGquency is constant. 
Figure 1 shows the components 
of an amplitude modulated wave- 
form; (a) is the carrier RF signal, 
[b] is the audio-modulation sig- 
nal and (c) shows the amplitude- 
modulated carrier signal. In FM, 
the carrier amplitude is con- 
stant, while the carrier frequency 
varies in proportion to the audio 
signal rate. Figure 2-a shows an 



FM audio signal, and Fig. 2-b is 
the frequency-modulated carrier. 

The AM band is much lower in 
the RF spectrum than FM; AM 
spans 535-1605 kHz. while FM 
spans 88—108 MHz. AM channels 
are 10 kHz wide and FM channels 
are 200 kHz wide, so you would 
be able to squeeze only about 5.5 
FM channels onto the entire AM 
band. There are 107 AM channels 
presently available, and 100 on 
FM, 

FM signals normally don't 
propagate beyond 75 miles, 
which is considered the line-of- 
sight limit and is within the Very- 
High Frequency (VHF) range. 
The VHF range used by broad- 
casters is subject to signal scat- 
tering from obstructions such as 
building edges or hills and is 
prone to fading in and out under 
certain conditions. In contrast, 
AM signals often travel veiy great 
distances. The difference be- 
tween AM and FM signal propa- 
gation is due to the great 
difference in their carrier fre- 
quencies, not their modulation 
differences. 




FIG. 1— AM SIGNAL COMPONENTS; {a) is 
the carrier signal, (ft) is the modulating 
signal, and (c) is the amplitude modulated 
signal at a constant frequency. 



TWo characteristics of FM oper- 
ation are responsible for its high 
fidehty response: wide band- 
width transmission and con- 
stant carrier amplitude. The 
wide bandwidth allows a wider 
range of audio frequencies to be 
processed, up to 15 kHz for FM, 
compared to only 5 kHz for AM. 
The source of most noise in AM 
transmission and reception is 
from atmospheric or static noise 
resulting from lightning, fluores- 
cent device radiation, and elec- 
tronic machinery, especially dur- 
ing hot weather. AM transmis- 
sion is, therefore, amplitude- 
sensitive. By maintaining a con- 
stant carrier amplitude in FM, 
static noise can virtually be elimi- 
nated. FM was originally used for 
stereo because of its high fidelity. 



m 
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z 
o 
cc 
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6 

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a: 
72 




FIG. 2— HERE IS AN FM SIGNAL; {a} is the 
audio modulating signal and (b) is the fre- 
quency modulated carrier signal at a con- 
stant amplitude. 



FM poptilailtjr 

After World War 11, AM stations 
began adding FM. There weren't 
many FM stations back then, so 
FM programming consisted pri- 
marily of classical music to take 
advantage of the high fidelity; 
otherwise they just duplicated 
AM programming. FM grew slow- 
ly, because consumer-electronics 
manufacturers and the public 
were mesmerized by TV. Some 
AM stations gave up on FM. relin- 
quishing their FCC FM station 
licenses. They regretted it later, 
when FM became prominent but, 
by then, most FM frequency al- 
locations were gone. 

Several factors contributed to 
the prominence of FM. Stereo ar- 
rived in the early 1960's, becom- 
ing the foundation of further 
success. The availability of FM 
stereo receivers, component sys- 
tems, AM/FM portables, and AM/ 
FM car stereos followed. The FCC 
eventually ruled that most com- 
bined AM/FM stations had to pro- 
gram AM and FM broadcasts 
separately, forcing broadcasters 
to create competitive FM pro- 
gramming. There then arose a 
couple of generations of listeners 
who used radio mainly for music, 
not comedy, drama, or news. 

The growth of FM over AM in 
the last 16 years has been dra- 
matic. In 1972, AM had 75% of 
the radio audience; that was re- 
versed by 1988. FM is considered 
the stereo music inedium, which 
is what most listeners want. 
However, not all AM is in trouble; 
large markets capable of develop- 
ing major audience shares com- 
mand sale prices of tens of 
millions of dollars. However, the 
average AM station is far less 
glamorous. 

AM's battie against FM 

Most mid-size markets have a 
couple of AM stations at the bot- 
tom of the ratings. The top two or 
three in a market get by on com- 
munity service, creative pro- 
gramming, good management, 
and poor competition. Most AM 
stations that are considered to be 
on shaky-grounds are those that 
broadcast daytime-only stations, 
especially those that have no FM 
companion station, and aren't 
part of a broadcasting group un- 
der one owner. They sink or swim 
on their own and most drown; 
about 65% lose money. 







FIG. 3— AM RADIO TRANSMITTING TOW- 
ERS aren't the beacons of comedy and 
drama they were in the good old days. 



The FCC helped by giving most 
daytime stations post-sunset 
broadcast authorizations, but 
the rules often dictate transmit- 
ter powers as low as 1-50 watts! 
Even for a small-town station, 
that's not enough power to pro- 
vide the needed coverage, es- 
pecially if there's competition. 
AM's crowded frequencies are an- 
other problem, especially for 
night listening when signals 
propagate farther Interference 
obviously turns listeners away. 
Many AM channels are a jumble 
of noise at night, with half a doz- 
en stations fighting to be heard 
and none succeeding. 

In the 1960 s and most of the 
1970's, AM rode high, and many 
broadcasters and investors want- 
ed part of the market. Hundreds 
of new stations began during 
that period, crowding the AM 
dial. Many towns of 20,000 peo- 
ple have two or three AM stations 
competing for large FM au- 
diences. The economic down- 
turn of the late 1970's and early 
80s hurt many AM stations, es- 
pecially those in rust and farm 
belts, which suffered most from 
the sluggish economy. 

AM radio generally gets a small 
slice of local advertising, with the 
larger chunk going to FM. TV, ca- 
ble, newspaper shopping, and 
billboard competition is very 
heavy. Falling revenues mean less 
money for promotional or inno- 



vative program changes, or high- 
quaiity air personalities that 
might hold an audience, [n 1988, 
AM and FM each had about 5,000 
commercial stations; AM sta- 
tions did $1.7-$1.9 billion of 
business, while FM stations did 
$4.8-$5 billion. FMs early lack of 
commercial success helped draw 
listeners because of fewer com- 
mercials. And, while FM stations 
do air more commercials today, 
they still air about half as many 
as AM stations — they just charge 
more. 

AM solutions 

AM station managers know the 
problems, and try to find solu- 
tions. They know audiences 
don't see AM as a music medium, 
A National Association of Broad- 
casters survey on public at- 
titudes toward AM found that 
75% of respondents want good 
programming with good tech- 
nical sound. The survey showed 
both a strong preference for 
news-talk-information on AM, 
and an older audience. Some sta- 
tions try drastic cures. "Nar- 
rowcasting" or "niche program- 
ming" describes programming 
aimed at very specific audiences: 

• In New York, WFAN (once 
WNBC, flagship station of the 
NBC network) runs an all-sports 
format; play-by-play, sports talk, 
and news. 

• In Los Angeles, with 100 com- 
peting stations, KMNY devotes it- 
self to money, and how to have 
more of it, syndicating some pro- 
grams to other stations. 

• All-kiddie radio by KPAL, Little 
Rock, Arkansas, includes chil- 
dren's music, stories, and school 
news reported by children. 

• In Florida. WWNN broadcasts 
self-help and positive-thinking 
radio programs, 

• Several stations now use sin- 
gle-theme approaches to music. 
There are all-Elvis stations, and 
at least one playing only Beatles 
music. 

Whether these formats will last 
is yet to be seen. For example, all- 
weather and traffic formats have 
been tried and abandoned in Los 
Angeles and Minneapolis. AM 
stations can also inexpensively 
subscribe to satellite program 
services. Services with a "big 
city" feel have proven successful 
for smaller stations, especially 
when such services can mean 




BETTER RECEIVERS FOR BETTER SOUND 



One of the main reasons why AM has 
taken a back seat to FM is because of 
AM's inherently poor fidelity. The National 
Association of Broadcasters (NAB) is try- 
ing to do something atxiut that. Specifical- 
ly, the NAB is trying to convince electronic 
manufacturers to incorporate three design 
improvements into their A(^ receivers. 
Those improvements, which are in accor- 
dance with the National Radio Systems 
Committee (NRSC) suggested guidelines 
are: the ability to receive frequencies with- 
in the expanded band. AM stereo com- 
patibility and, de-emphasis circuitry. 

Manufacturers will be able to make 
units that receive transmitted signals in 
the expanded bandwidth fairly easily and 
inexpensiveiy. However, they are much 
more reluctant to jump into mass produc- 
tion of AM stereo receivers — adsipting cur- 
rent product designs to incorporate stereo 
reception can be an expensive proposi- 
tion. 

Another stumbling bloct< that manufac- 
turers face is that there are two mutually 
incompatible systems on the market. 
Motorola's C-Quam and Kahn Communi- 
cations are two AM stereo systems that 
are currently in use by broadcasters today 
C-Quam is used by approximately 500 
broadcasters, while only about 100 broad- 
casters use the Kahn System. The only 
commercially available AM stereo re- 
ceivers on the market are compatible with 
Motorola's C-Quam transmitter design. 
Sony, Sanyo and Sansui previously made 
10 stereo detectors that were compatible 
with both the C-Quam and Kahn transmis- 
sion systems, and about 20 such receiver 
models were once produced by those 
companies. However, those chips and re- 
ceivers are no longer in production be- 
cause of various legal battles between 
Kahn and Motorola. We may again see 
some Kahn-compatible receivers after the 
legal dispute is over 

There ate still many varied opinions in 
the broadcasting field about which system 
is better Broadcast engineers profess the 
advantages of each system, and may 
choose one system over another because 
of their specific transmission needs, or 
personal preferences. When AM stereo 
was first introduced years ago, FCCls "let 
the marketplace decide" attitude sealed 
the fate of AM stereo by causing a re- 
lentless battle tjetween various competing 
systems. Now, more than eight years after 
the introduction of AM stereo, the two sur- 
vivors, Kahn and Motorola, are stilt bat- 
tling it out. The FCC's lack of direction 
during the early stages has hindered the 
acceptance of AM stereo, and has hurt not 
only electronic manufacturers, but con- 
sumers, too. 



savings through staff cutbacks, 
or when staff can be freed to de- 
velop more local and major news 
programming. It's easy to insert 
local news, sports, weather, and 
other features. 



Frequency boosting, or pre-emphasis 
is a design modification that the NRSC is 
recommending to reduce noise transmis- 
sion for higher fideiffy. Within the time in- 
terval that an AM signal carrier is 
transmitted and received, the can-ier sig- 
nal may tie affected by noise. The greatest 
impact that noise has on the carrier is 
changing the amplitude. FM is much less 
subject to that type of noise distortion be- 
cause it is transmitted at a constant ampli- 
tude. The sound volume of an AM 
detector is proportional to deviation of the 
carrier amplitude. If the audio signals 
cause a much larger amplitude change 
than the unwanted noise amplitude devia- 
tions, during transmission and reception, 
then the noise will not be very noticeable. 
That relationship is called the signat-to- 
notse ratio— the higher the value, the bet- 
ter the sound quality. 




PRE-EMPHASIS CHARACTERISTIC 
suggested by the NRSC for AM trans- 
mission. 

In a pre-emph3sis circuit, a portion of 
the transmitted signal is bioosted, or p re- 
emphasized, causing a larger carrier am- 
plitude deviation. The receiver conversely 
de-emphasizes, or attenuates that signal. 
The overall effect is to increase the sign al- 
to noise-ratio. The accompanying figure 
shows the 75 pjs pne-emphasis charac- 
teristic suggested for use. 

The NAB is woriting closely with the 
electronic industry to develop a certifica- 
tion for improved AM receiver designs 
which follow NRSC guidelines. One idea 
is to authorize the use of a quality mark 
that will identify receivers that comply with 
NRSC standards. Broadcasters are also 
receptive to the idea of promoting the new 
design standards in AM receivers. Clearly, 
AM stereo compatibility and the efforts to 
improve AM sound quality are compli- 
cated issues which are still being worked 
out Perhaps with the cooperation of the 
electronic industry, broadcasters, and the 
FCC, AM will continue as a viable commu- 
nications medium. 



m 



Not long ago, AM operators ;^ 

thought the answer was AM ster- m 

eo, but it's been a disappointing m 

panacea. Most broadcast experts 3 

feel that the FCC ruined things s 

by refusing to pick a specific AM o 

73 




FIG. 4— TALK SHOWS, OFTEN WfTH LIVE GUESTS, are a programming staple of stations 

of all sizes. 




FIG. 5— WELL-RUN SMALL-TOWN STATIONS witti a solid history are likely to continue a 
successful tradition. 



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stereo approach from the half- 
dozen stations competing for 
FCC approval. Instead, the FCC 
let the market decide, and so far 
it hasn't. In the last seven years, 
AM stereo has barely affected the 
minds of broadcasters or the 
public, 

TWo AM stereo systems are still 
competing: Motorola's C-Quam, 
and the system developed by 
Kahn Communications, Broad- 
casters haven't reached a con- 
sensus on which should be 
standard. Only 10% of AM sta- 
tions now have stereo. The au- 
dience percentage that use AM 
stereo gear is still low, and there's 



no real impetus to switch, which 
can cost up to $100.000— half a 
year's income or more for some 
small stations, 

AM's expanded band 

An important change affecting 
AM broadcasters as well as radio 
receiver manufacturers is that of 
AM frequency band expansion, 
or 'AM improvement." In 1988. 
the World Administrative Radio 
Conference agreed to expand the 
AM radio upper bound from 1600 
kHz to 1700 kHz, effective July 1, 
1990. Ten additional channel 
slots will be available as a result 
of the expansion. With 20 to 30 



stations per channel, a total of 
approximately 200 to 300 new 
AM stations in the U.S. could 
conceivably occupy the expanded 
band. 

The primary objective of the 
FCC in authorizing transmission 
in the upper range is to unclutter 
the existing band and reduce the 
overall levels of broadcast inter- 
ference. Stations who are consid- 
ered as causing the most inter- 
ference will be given highest 
priority by the FCC for transmis- 
sion in the upper band. Some 
night-time broadcasters are con- 
sidered to be the "worst offend- 
ers," and the FCC is hoping that 
most of those stations will volun- 
tarily migrate into the upper 
band. The advantage of changing 
into the upper band is that the 
adjacent stations will experience 
less interference, and the listener 
will receive a much clearer broad- 
cast. 

After a transition period, the 
FCC will make new AM stations 
available for new licensees, so 
that broadcasters can make full 
use of the entire expanded band. 
Stations who are licensed to 
broadcast within the new upper 
range will be able to transmit full- 
time, with power restrictions of 
minimum 1 kilowatts after sun- 
set and 10 kilowatts during 
daylight hours. 

Many problems, however, still 
need to be solved. Existing ser- 
vices, such as the TVaveler's Infor- 
mation Stations [TISj will need to 
move or — because the TIS are 
considered by the FCC to be sec- 
ondary broadcasters — may have 
to relinquish their transmitting 
rights. 

So, can we see the future of 
AM? Clearly, it'll hardly vanish 
from your dial. Most stations will 
likely solve problems by new pro- 
gramming, promotion, manage- 
ment, and technology. Some may 
not have their prior success, hav- 
ing to live with less. But those 
with bleak futures may die out 
due to survival of the fittest. That 
sort of periodic adjustment be- 
falls most industries, when 
change creates a new operating 
climate, killing off and weeding 
out the weak, leaving what's left 
leaner and meaner. Meanwhile, 
those who live and work in the 
world of AM radio today can only 
echo Molly's long ago words: 
"Tkint funny McGee!" R-E 



74 




IZMnMnXZHHIIHi 




Perpetual motion, independent research, the 
magnetocaloric effect, and audio voltmeters. 



□DN LANCASTER 



It's not at all obvious to me why we 
need all of the foot dragging, in- 
fighting, and squabbling going on 
today over HDTV high-quaiity video- 
display standards. It seems that sev- 
eral government agencies are now 
battling each other to win the coveted 
role of chief obstructionist. 

To me. it is entirely obvious that 
HDTV wilt use square pixels, will not 
have intedace, will use fully program- 
mable, rather than hard-wired (single 
standard) receivers and displays, wili 
be totally digital, will use a real-time 
JPEG compression, and wilt follow 
Japanese set standards. 

It is also totally obvious to me that 
terrestrial broadcasting will sen/e a 
negligible to totally vanishing role in 
HDTV, while the computing, satellite, 
VCR, and cable uses will over- 
whelmingly dominate. And any inter- 
mediate or interim "transition" steps 
will prove to be a monumental waste 
of time and money, done by the 
wrong people for the wrong reasons. 

So, let's just ban the networks and 
the feds from any HDTV input what- 
soever and then get on with it. They 
are the enemy, not Japan. Our topics 
this month seem to range from the 
ridiculous to the sublime... 

Perpetual motion 

It may be the New Age nineties, or 
just a sunspot cycle peak, but a sur- 
prisingly large number of all you hard- 
ware hackers are busy at work 
building your own perpetual motion 
machines. I simply cannot believe the 
number of helpline calls and visitor 
drop-ins I am getting on this. 

Since perpetual motion is definitely 
real as far as its history and its ongo- 
ing activities are concerned, maybe 
we should take a brief look hens. 

I guess I was in the seventh grade 
when I built my first perpetual motion 
machine. Figure 1 shows the details. 1 
took a gyroscope and hung several 
magnets on it so that like poles faced 
each other. The magnets were at an 
angle so that the repulsion would 



have a tangential component. As the 
poles repelled each other, the gyro- 
scope would accelerate. 

Or so I thought at the time. Very 
strangely the gyroscope locked up 
instead of spinning. Seems it latched 
itself into a minimum reluctance field 
position and just sat there. 

These days, I guess 1 don't really 
understand why perpetual motion is 
desirable. Since unlimited free ener- 
gy would hasten the entropic heat 
death of the planet, perpetual motion 
is both environmentally unconsciona- 
ble and socially reprehensible. The 
first thing we should do to a suc- 
cessful perpetual motion machine 
designer is to just stake him to an 
anthill, and then leave him out there 
until the next meeting of the steering 
committee. 

Nonetheless, perpetual motion is a 
fascinating topic. Some very good 
books on this subject are available 
from Lindsay Publications, while a 
few of the more opportune ongoing 
perpetual-motion scams are available 
to you through HSA Industries or the 
Teste Book Company. 

After working with a bunch of 
them, the perpetual-motion buildees 
these days all appear to share several 
common traits. None of them have 
ever attended an introductory college 
physics course, or else they seem to 
have slept through it. 

While all of them claim they "just 
can't find anything at all" on their 
idea, they studiously go out of their 
way to avoid doing any real or honest 
library research. As we've found out 

NEED HELP? 



Phone or write your Hardware 
Hacker questions directly to; 

Don Lancaster 

Synergetics 

Box 809 

Thatcher, AZ 85552 

(602) 428-4073 



several times in the past, any hard- 
ware hacker anywhere can instantly 
get the very latest scoop on anything 
by way of the Dialog Information Ser- 
vice. More on this shortly 

A disproportionate number of the 
perpetual-motion buildees seem to 
belong to one particular religion that 
happens to be very big on faith and on 
self-reliance. 

There's often a very heavy dose of 
paranoia, usually aimed at the patent 
office, a local university, those oil 
companies, Detroit (who could not 
possibly suppress anything except 
quality or profits), an ex-boss, or else 
"them" in general. 

Almost always, the buildees think 
linearly instead of cyclically. Thus, 
while a power stroke of the repelling 
magnets or their freezing milk bottle 
makes a lot of sense to them, they 
usually ignore the inevitable repetitive 
and cyclic energy supplying steps as 
needed to get to that stage. 

There's also the Cosmic cupcake 
syndrome, the Few chips shy of a full 
jboard affliction , and the Boy a whole 
flock of them flew over that time con- 
cept. But we need not get into any of 
these here. 

Finally, there is the magic bullet. 
Their idea almost but not quite works. 
So, all we need to fix it is better 
gears, stronger magnets, a larger 
milk bottle, or a different rear axle 
ratio. Or more bucks for research. 

Several of us folks around here at 
Radio-Electronics editorial have 
now somehow gotten some silly 
ideas into our collective heads. For 
some unbeknownst reason, many of 
us presently feel that: 

CA) Neither matter nor energy can 
be created or destroyed, except by 
an atomic process. 

CB) Available energy always seems 
to convert itself from higher quality 
forms into lower and less useful 
ones. Not once have the dishes ever 
washed themselves. Nor have those 
pool balls ever re-racked themselves. 

(C) Nearly all physical and elec- 




FIG. 1— MY VERY FIRST PERPETUAL MO- 
TtON MACHINE. As the like poles of the 
magnets repel each other, they accelerate 
ttie rotor on a gyroscope. Sadly, it latched, 
rather than speeding up. But maybe if I 
used stronger magnets... 



tronic processes end up producing 
unrecoverable low-grade heat ener- 
gy, usually through friction or elec- 
trical resistance. 

(D3 Despite a House-Senate com- 
promise committee, Congress is not 
expected to repeal the three laws of 
thermodynamics this session. Para- 









1 




^ NEW FROM 


~1 






DON LANCASTER 






HANDS-ON BOOKS 






Hardware Hacker Reprints 11 


24.50 






Ask The Guru Reprints 1 or II 


24.50 






CMOS Cookbook 


18.S0 






TTL Cookbook 


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Active Filter Cookbook 


15,50 






Micro Cookbook vol 1 or II 


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Enhancing your Apple 1 or II 


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Apple Writer Cookbook 


19.50 






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21,50 






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10.50 






LaserWriter Reference-[Apple) 


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15.50 






Reat World Postscript (Roth) 


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UNLOCKED SOFTWARE 








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^FREE VOICE HELPLINE VISA/McJ 






SYNERGETICS 




Box 809-RE 








Thatcher, AZ 85552 






(602) 428-4073 


A 






CIRCLE 83 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 





phrased, these three laws are (1) You 
can't win; (2J You can't break even; 
and (3) Yes, the dice are crooked, but 
its the only game in town, 

I guess one of the reasons some of 
us around here feel this way is that 
not once in the entire history of hard- 
vrare hacking has even one reproduci- 
ble counter example to these silly 
ideas of ours ever been successfully 
and unarguably demonstrated. 

Naturally, you are free to agree or 
disagree with us as you wish. But if 
you disagree, we do make only one 
simple request: Provide us with an 
experiment that can be independent- 
ly duplicated by disinterested out- 
siders which causes your effect to 
show up at least reasonably well. 
Then we will all believe. 

Doing serious researcli 

So, what is the best way to re- 
search any topic? I don't know how 
many calls and letters I have gotten 
from people who live in such a "re- 
mote" area and will claim that "abso- 
lutely nothing" is available locally. 
Believe it or not, one of these letters 
was from Cambridge, MA and yet an- 
other was from F^lo Alto, CA. 

Well, I've been sitting right here 
watching Gila Monsters on this sand 
dune smack dab in the middle of the 
Upper Sonoran desert for nearly two 
decades now. While almost every- 
thing I do is local Cand much of it done 
underground or in mountaintop wil- 
derness areas), I've had no problems 
whatsoever handling top-quality re- 
search on all kinds of very rewarding 
and well-paying topics. 

So don't give me any "remote" 
bull. Admittedly, my tiny and isolated 
town of 2400 does have its own sym- 
phony orchestra, but that's another 
story. 

Figure 2 lists a few of my key se- 
crets to doing independent hacker 
research. The overwhelming reason 
you cannot find something is be- 
cause you are not looking. You are 
instead going through some inept 
motions and keeping yourself busy, 
rather than by taking obvious steps 
and handling all of them in a logical 
manner 

Research is not an activity that you 
turn on or off. Instead, you put your- 
self in a continuous research mode in 
which you gather and collect 
everything, needed or not, or ex- 
pected or not. Never mind the topic. 
The subject does not matter in the 



least, since chance favors the pre- 
pared mind. Thus, your own personal 
resource file is far and away the most 
important place to look, should any 
specific need come up. 

Set a minimum goal of eight cubic 
yards for your personal resource 
files. At least for a bare bones start- 
up. Then let it grow From there. 

Your foremost outside resource 
should be all of the trade journals. I 
subscribe to over 400 of them. As we 
have seen in the past, any and all 
fields have all their own private tech- 
nical magazines which are intended 
for a select group of insiders. Most of 
these are free, provided you tell them 
what they want to hear on their 
qualification cards. Many do Include 
bingo cards, annual directories, and 
tech info. 

Naturally, you'll circle everything 
even remotely usable on the bingo 
cards. If in doubt, circle it. If you do 
not personally rent the largest box in 
your local post office, you've missed 
the point here completely. 

Electronic trade journal examples 
include E.E. Times. Electronics, EDN, 
Electronic Products, Electronic De- 



RARE EARTH RESOURCES 

ABS3r 

Box 8247 Ward Hill 
Haverhill, MA 01835 
(800) 343-1990 

CIRCLE 259 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Atfa Products 

PO Box 8247 
Ward Hill, MA 01835 
(800) 343-0660 

CIRCLE 2«0 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Cerac 

PO Box 1178 
Milwaukee, Wl 53201 
(414) 289-9800 

CIRCLE 261 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

ESPI 

5310 Derry 
Agoura, CA 91301 
(800) 638-2581 

CIRCLE 262 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Fisher Scientific 

711 Forbes Avenue 
Pittsburgh, PA 15219 
(412) 562-8300 

CIRCLE 263 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Goodfellow 

301 Lindenwood Drive Ste 1 
Malvern, PA 19355 
(800) 821-2870 

CIRCLE 264 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



76 



I 



(2) 
(3} 




r 



(6)- 




k' 



(9)- 

K 

(10) 



If you can't find it. you ain't lookin. 

Research is a continuous activity done on a total tifestyte basis. 
You cannot turn it on and off at will. 

Anticipate what you are going to research in the future and get 
started on it long ahead of any actual or possible need. 

Your own personal resource file should be your first and foremost 
starting piace. Your begining file should fill at least eight cubic 
yards, and should expand from there. 

The (fee trade journais are far and away your most important 
external resource. A complete (isting appears in Uhlricht's 
Periodicals Dictionary. Use those bingo cards! 

The Dialog Information Service at your local library can instantly find 
anything for you from anywhere at anytime. 

Other important library resources are the Science Citations Index, the 
Thomas Registn' of Manufacturers, Interlidrary loan, the UMI reprint 
service, and the Encyclopedia of Associations. 

Form an extensive network of contacts outside of your circle of family, 
friends, or work associates. Clubs, helplines, and BBS systems are 
ideal for this sort of thing. 

Let your subconscious be your guide, starting from fundamental 
principles and guidelines. Go with the vibes 

Quest tinajas. 




FIG. 2— SEVERAL OF MY INSIDER secrets on independent research 



sign, and dozens more. We'll look at 
these names and numbers in some 
future sidebar. 

For now, you go to the library and 
view the Hacker's Holy Grail, tfiat is 
otherwise known as the Utilricht's 
Periodicals Dictionary. This one hard- 
ware hacking resource is far and away 
more important than all of the rest put 
together Use and enjoy. 

The second most important out- 
side Hardware Hacking research re- 
source is the Dialog Information 
Service. It's also at your local library. 
For a small fee. Dialog will instantly 
research anything, anywhere, any- 
time. As an example, we'll shortly be 
looking at magnetic refrigeration. To 
get From knowing virtually nothing on 
the topic to having eighteen of the 
most recent worldwide key abstracts 
in hand took me a total of seven min- 
utes and cost me a total of $27.57. 

There's lots of other goodies in the 
library, should you snoop around in 
enough nooks and crannies. In gener- 
al, the least valuable things in any 
library are its takeout books. There's 
that free Interlibrary Loan Sen/ice 
which lets you get anything from any- 
where, and the faster UMI service 
which can get you any reprint of any- 
thing provided you know the exact 
title, journal, and pages. For much 
less than Dialog, as long as you don't 
mind waiting a few days. 



There's also a Thonias Registry of 
Manufacturers that lists who makes 
everything, but I've found this to be of 
limited utility. Also, check into the 
Encyclopedia of Associations, and, if 
you can't locate Uhlricht's, then the 
International Standard Periodicals 
Dictionary is almost as good. 

Another library favorite of mine is 
the virtually unknown Science Cita- 
tions Index. Unlike all the others, this 
one lets you move forward through 
time, rather than back into older and 
older material. It works by listing who 
put whom into their bibliographies. 

For instance, any competent new 
technical paper on active filters must 
reference Sallen and Key. Anything 
new on cold fusion absolutely must 
list Pons and Heischman. Anything 
new on unfocused solar collectors 
simply must cite Winston, and so on. 
If they don't, then they aren't worth 
reading anyhow 

Simply shove any of these names 
through the index, and you'll generate 
all of the newer papers In the field. 
After a while, new author names will 
start cropping up and repeating. You 
then use the avalanche effect to find 
the latest and the best, just by start- 
ing with one or two ancient authors. 

And do not ignore the library's kid- 
die, young adult, or popular press 
books. Excellent, understandable, 
and readable backgrounds are easily 



picked up in the Doubleday Science 
Series, or the Life Science Library. 

Beyond the library, you'll want to 
collect the specialty direct-mail 
books catalogs. We've covered this 
resource in depth in a previous col- 
umn and contest. More details ap- 
pear in my Hardware Hacker II 
reprints. 

Let's see. What else is there? 
You'll definitely want to set up some 
sort of extensive personal network 
that involves people strictly outside 
of any friends, family, or work associ- 
ates. Obviously, my help line works 
like a champ here. Electronic bulletin 
board systems are another great 
route to networking. So are clubs. 

Your own personal experiments 
can very much clarify any topic, as 
can teaching a class on it. The pur- 
pose of research is to get the effect 
you are after to show up reasonably 
well in as simple and as cheap a way 
as possible. 

But stay in school forever While 
there's lots of possibilities here, the 
best I've found are local community 
college courses, and that self-study 
material from Heath. 

Finally, simply let things gel. Take 
Bowseretta up the mountain. Quest a 
tinaja. Map that terminal crawlway. 
Any field has an order and a flow to it. 
Often in directions that "they" don't 
care to admit. Start with a few funda- 
mentals, think about it for a while, and 
a pretty fair picture of the rest may fall 
in place without much in the way of 
conscious inten/ention. 

Remember that sincerity is every- 
thing. Once you've got that faked, all 
else follows. 

This month's contest 

Tel lya what. I am about to reveal 
here for the first time a stunning new 
technological breakthrough, one that 
is eminently hackable, besides being 
a sure fire winner for a research topic, 
school paper or science-fair entry. 

Only instead of me doing all the 
work, let's try doing it together See 
how much you can improve your re- 
search skills along the way. 

Just show me an easily done and 
Radio-Electronics-compatlble 
method to demo the magnetocaloric c 
effect described below, at room or 
lower temperatures. Or else add in [ 
any way Cpatents, papers, articles, I 
data sheets, etc.) to our ongoing : 
magnetic refrigeration dialog below. ; 

There'll be all the usual Incredible < 



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FIG. 3 — THE MAGNETOCALORIC 
EFFECT, very greatly oversimplified. 
Gadolinium and other rare earth alloys 
can absorb heat energy in the presence of 
a magnetic field and release it otherwise. 
The efficiency can be as much as 40:1 
better than mechanical cooling. Magnetic 
refrigeration is usable over an absolute 
zero to above room temperature range. 
Important first uses will be in cryogenics, 
superconductivity, liquefied gases, and 
hydrogen fuels, 

Secref Mon&/ Machine book prizes, 
along with an all-expense-paid (FOB 
Thatcher, AZ) tinaja quest going to 
the very best of all. As usual, send 
your written entries directly to me 
here at Synergetics, rather than di- 
rectly over to Radio-Electronics 
editorial. 

Magnetic refrigeration 

There's apparently a brand new 
way to cool things that is just turning 
the corner from laboratory to pre- 
liminary product development. If what 
has happened so far is to be believed, 
it shoulcf completely blow away many 
traditional cooling schemes, par- 
ticularly at very low temperatures. 

This genuine breakthrough is 
called the magnetocaloric effect, and 
I have grossly oversimplified it in Fig. 
3. The latest key papers appear in the 
listings of Fig. 4. 

Basically, if you take critical rane 
earth elements or their alloys, they 
will absorb heat when magnetized 
and release heat otherwise, acting as 
a heat pump. At least over certain 
temperature ranges and over spec- 
ified magnetic field strengths. 
Gadolinium is one popular material. 

Heat transfer operations take 
place in and around the Curie Point. 
Most magnetic materials lose many 
of their properties when they exceed 
their Curie Point temperature. 

The magnetocaloric effect can bg 
tuned over a range of absolute zero to 
above room temperature. Efficien- 
cies as much as 40:1 better than me- 




Magnetocaloric Effect in Strong Magnetic Fields 

A.M. Tishin, Cyrogenics (UK). Febrjary 1990, v30 #2, pp 127-13$. 

Magnetocaloric Effects In Rare Earth Magnetic Materials 

A.S, Andreenko. et. al.. Soviet Physics (USA), August 1989, v32 #8, pp 649-664, 

Magnetocaloric Effect in Thulium 

C.B. Zimm, el al,. Cyrogenics (UK), Saptember 1989, v29 #9, pp 937-938. 

Magnetic Refrigeration 

Superconductivity Industries, Spring 1989, v2 #1 , pp 32-41 . 

Magnetocaloric Effect and Refrigerant Capacity of Tt>-Dy Alloys 

S,A. Nitkin, et,al, Physics Status Sotidi (East Germany). May 1989, pp 117-121, 

Magnetic Refrigerator for Superconducting Magnets at 1,8K 
V.A. Allov, etal.. tCEC 12 (UK). 1988, pp 635-640, 

Magneto-thermal Properties of Sliitered Gadolinium 
E. Gmelln, et al., ICEC 12 (UK). 1988, pp 432-436, 

Deter mination of Ihe Cooling Capacity of Magnetic Refrigerants 

S. Nikilin, et. al., Soviet Tecfinical Ptiysics Letters, April 1988. v14 #4, pp 327-328. 

Magnetic Refrigerator 

T. Hashimoto, Relrigeratiort (Japan), 1908. v63 #733, pp 1 189-1201. 

Magnetic Field Changes In the Entropy of Europium Sulphide 

P. Bredy, et,al, Cyrogentic (UK), Sept 88, v28 #9, pp 605-606. 

Mag netot hernial Conductivity of Er-AI for Cyrogentc Applications 

C,B, Zimm, et,a!,, Jourrtat of Applied Physics, 15 April 1985, V57 #6, p4294-4296, 

Adiabatic Temperature Changes in Ferromagnetic Intermetalllc Compounds 
C.B. Zimm, etal., Joumat of Applied Physics. 15 April 1985. v57 #8, p3829. 

Magnetic Relrigeratton 

T. Hashimoto, et. al.. Solid State Physics (Japan). March 198S. v£0 #3, pi 61-175, 

Characteristics of Magnetocaloric Refrigerants below 20K 

T. Hashimoto, et.al., ICEC 9 (Japan). May 1989, pp 26-29, 

A Composite Material for Magnetic Refrigeration Usmg Internal Heat Transfer. 

B. Daudfn, et.al. Cyrogenics (Great Britian). September 1982, v22 #9, pp 439-440, 

Magnetic Refrigeration from 10K to Room Temperature 

T. Hashimoto, et.al., Cyrogenics (Great Britian), November 1981 , v21 #1 1 , pp 647-653 

T-S Diagram tor Gadolinium Near the Curie Temperature 

S. Benlord. el. a!,. Journal ol Applied Physics, f/arch 1 981 , «52 #3, pp 21 10-21 1 2: 

The Magnetocaloric Effect in Dysprosium 

S. Benlord, et,al. Journal o( Applied Physics. March 1979, v50 #3, pp 1868-1870. 



1 



FIG. 4— A FEW OF THE RECENT PAPERS on magnetic refrigeration and the new magne- 
tocaloric effect. 



0.0 IS nF 



lOnF 




I 



DC OUT 



■t^6V0C 

FIG. 5— AN AUDIO VOLTMETER having a range of to - 80 dBm. Use ttiis one to calibrate 
microptiones and speakers, or as a receiver "S" meter. Output is 0.5 volts at - 80 dBm and 
5 volts at dBm. Sensitivity is 10 microvolts. 



chanical refrigeration have been 
bandied about. Yes, the effect can be 
done using no moving parts. 

Obvious applications for magnetic 
refrigeration include cryogenics and 
superconductivity, the production of 



liquid gases (especially hydrogen as a 
fuel), and as Freon replacements for 
traditional room air conditioners. A 
few sources of gadolinium and its re- 
lated rare earths are shown in our 
continued on page 90 



78 




all the sensors are blocked. You 
should notice that the left wheel 
will slowly change from a coun- 
ter-clockwise to a clockwise direc- 
tion and the right wheel will 
change from a clockwise to a 
counter-clockwise rotation. If the 



Lawn Ranger has passed all tests 
so far, it is ready for outdoor test- 
ing. 

If it did not pass one or more of 
the tests, double check the opera- 
tion of the CPU board as de- 
scribed in the June issue. 



Outdoor guidance testing 

Now it is time to have some real 
fun! Make sure your neighbors or 
friends are out because they wiU 
love to see the capabilities of your 
new creation. Cut a six-foot thick 
square border around a small 
grassy lest area with a conven- 
tional lawn mower (don't use the 
Lawn Ranger yet). Connect the 
manual controller, squeeze the 



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your field. Grantham can help you 
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Grantham offers two degree pro- 
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No commuting to class. Study at 
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POWER BOARD COMPONENT SIDE AT HALF SIZE. 




POWER BOARD SOLDER SIDE AT HALF SIZE. 



hand switch and turn the Lawn 
Ranger on. "Walk" the unit to the 
cutting area and place it on the 
edge of the grass border with the 
tall grass positioned to the left — 
see Fig. 1 of the June issue. 

Adjust the height of the grass 
sensors so their tips lie approxi- 
mately one inch above the cut 
grass. The uncut grass should be 
around two inches higher than 
the cut grass for your first test. 
Remove the manual controller 
and push the run button. The 
mower will begin to track along 
the border you previously cut. It 
should continue tracking this 
border until you stop it. If it pass- 
es this test, you are ready to con- 
nect the cutting blades and really 
show off. 

Final test 

Now you are ready to connect 
the blades as shown in Fig. 3 
(make sure the batteries are dis- 



connected before attaching 
blades). Double check the shields 
that surround the cutting 
blades; they should be able to 
withstand a force as high as 60 
pounds upon impact to allow for 
safe operation. 

After the blades are attached, 
grab yourself a cold drink and 
"walk" the Lawn Ranger with the 
manual controller to the test 
area. Set up the mower as de- 
scribed above and connect the 
cutting-motor wire to Jll-2, Re- 
move the manual controller and 
turn the Lawn Ranger on. 

Push the CUT and run button. 
Now, watch in amazement as the 
mower automatically cuts the 
grass contained within the test 
area. You will love the way it 
"turns on a dime" when it 
reaches the end of a row. When it 
is finished with the job, it will 
steer in a tight circle searching 
for tall grass and then turn off R-E 



80 



AUDIO UPDATE 



The Sound of Audio: An AES conference report 



LARRY KLEIN 



Last month I wrote about an au- 
diophile High End Hi-Fi Show. 
This column is about an al- 
together different kind of "show" 
sponsored by the Audio Engineering 
Society (AES). Properly billed as a 
conference, rather than a show, "The 
Sound of Audio" was a wide-ranging 
exploration of the latest findings on 
the perception, measurement, re- 
cording, and reproduction of sound. 
A variety of papers were presented 
along with a special session on the 
reviewing of audio products featuring 
reviewers from both "slick" and "un- 
derground" publications. Given my 
20 years in charge of product review- 
ing for Steneo Review, I heard nothing 
new — although the session gave me 
a chance to say hello to a lot of old 
friends. However, the pertinent and 
intelligent questions from the au- 
dience led me to make a mental note 
to discuss the somewhat controver- 
sial topic of equipment reviews in a 
future /Aud/o Update column. Now, on 
with the conference. 

Pyschoacoustics 

Because of my ongoing interest in 
psychoacoustics, 1 found the several 
sessions devoted to audio percep- 
tion both interesting and enlighten- 
ing. As you may know, psycho- 
acoustics deals with subjective sonic 
perceptions, as contrasted to objec- 
tive sonic measurements. A simple 
example; For a sound to be heard 
subjectively as twice as loud, its ob- 
jective increase in sound-pressure 
level must be approximately 10 dB. 

The three presenters were all uni- 
versity researchers, and their talks 
included some of their own original 
research in addition to the very latest 
findings in the field. Rather than at- 
tempting to synthesize three lengthy, 
and sometimes complex, papers, I'll 
extract (and paraphrase when neces- 
sary) some of the opinions and find- 
ings that caught my ear 
• Despite hundreds of years of in- 
vestigation into human hearing, many 



mysteries and confusions remain. 
One author discussing the difficulties 
of operating in the area of qualitative 
judgments (Is it twice as loud or V/2 
times as loud?) urged that because 
we are trying to measure the behavior 
of a very complex biological system 
that we be skeptical of the derived 
numbers — -they might not mean what 
we think they do. I got a strong feeling 
that there is an enormous amount of 
research that remains to be done, 
and that digital manipulation of the 
testing signals is an important new 
facilitating tool. 

• There is more to hearing loss than 
a simple reduction of sensitivity to 



WHO IS AES? 

The AES is an international organi- 
zation whose membership includes 
more than 10,000 persons involved 
on a professional, semiprofessional. 
and amateur level in all aspects of 
audio. For further information on The 
Sound of Audio conference, on how 
to become a member of the AES, 
'■ and'or a catalog of avaiiabie publica- 
' tions and technical papers, write to: 
Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 
42nd Street, New Yorl<, NY 
10165-0075. 



various frequency areas. Unfor- 
tunately, at the frequencies where 
there is a hearing loss there are also 
additional changes that affect per- 
ception. Thus, we generally cannot 
restore normal perception tDy simply 
restoring normal sensitivity with a 
hearing aid or by using equalizers or 
tone controls in a hi-fi system. The 
study of the perceptual con- 
sequences of hearing loss is an im- 
portant and very active research area 
of psychoacoustics and audiology. 
• The ear has an incredible absolute 
sensitivity; At 3 kHz. where the ear is 
most sensitive, a sound at the thresh- 
old of hearing produces a displace- 
ment of the eardrum that is about Vioo 
of the diameter of a hydrogen mole- 
cule! The threshold of pain (ranging 



from 140 dB at 20 Hz to about 1 20 dB 
at 2 kHz) is generally given as the 
upper intensity limit of hearing. Unlike 
the eye, whose iris visibly adjusts it- 
self to the ambient illumination, the 
ear maintains its approximately 120- 
dB dynamic range by dividing dif- 
ferent intensity levels among sepa- 
rate groups of nerve fibers. Each of 
the fiber gnDups can handle a range of 
only 30-^0 dB. At levels about 40 dB 
or so. only about 15— 20% of the ear's 
30,000 nerve fibers are handling the 
incoming sounds. 

• It is almost always incorrect to 
refer to the loudness of a sound as, 
say, 90 dB SPL. Sound pressure level 
is a physical measurement and only 
indirectly related to loudness, which 
is a subjective evaluation. A sound 
measuring 90 dB could be, depend- 
ing on its frequency spectrum, loud 
or quite soft. 

• There's a new interest in sound- 
localization research. Some recent 
findings include: Complex, broad- 
band sounds are localized best, high 
frequencies must be present for 
accurate judgment of a sound 
source's apparent height, and lo- 
calization is most precise for signals 
in front and at ear level. 

It has been generally accepted that 
our brain localizes sound sources by 
using the intensity and timing dif- 
ference between the sounds reach- 
ing each of our ears. Although 
research has shown that the specific 
convolutions of our external ears 
Cpinnae) cause reflective cancella- 
tions and reinforcements of signals 
before they reach our ear canals, only 
recently has it been understood that 
this direction-dependent spectral fil- 
tering plays an important role in our 
ability to localize sound sources. 

Another recent experiment on di- cc 
rectional perception sought to deter- t 
mine the relative importance of g 
interaural arrival-time versus sound- a 
intensity differences in determining j 
localization. By digitally manipulating „ 
the signal, the experimenters were = 



8 



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able to feed the test subjects conflict- 
ing intensity and timing information. 
The expectation was that the sub- 
jects would "split the difference," but 
instead it turns out that the difference 
in interaural arrival time was the domi- 
nant localizing factor — as long as fre- 
quencies below 2 kHz were part of 
the signal. 

The authors concluded that this 
newly discovered time-difference 
dominance means that "modification 
of the intensity ratio between the 
right and left channels of a stereo 
recording cannot be expected to 
have any influence on the apparent 
position of the resultant sound im- 
age." I think I missed the author's 
point, because as far as I can tell my 
preamplifier's balance control (which 
operates by adjusting the relative 
gain levels of the right and left chan- 
nels) works as well as ever 

The final paper on the localization 
of sound sources related a series of 
complex experiments that set up 
"unnatural" acoustic conditions 
(such as having one reflecting wall in 
an otherwise anechoic environment) 
and used highly controlled, and 
equally unnatural, special acoustic 
test signals. It turns out that the sub- 
jects unconsciously evaluated the 
plausibility of the test signals against 
their real-word experience and ig- 
nored or re-weighted sounds that 
made no sense. An example of a non- 
sensical signal would be one in which 
the arrival-time differences between 
the ears exceed the maximum possi- 
ble (about 765 microseconds) for the 
human head, or one in which the de- 
layed reflected sound was louder 
than the direct sound. 

The paper didn't cover another re- 
lated phenomena — the ear/brain's 
ability to localize sounds where they 
"should" be rather than at their actu- 
al source. For example, when listen- 
ing to a performer on stage from 
anywhere in the audience, most peo- 
ple hear the sound coming from the 
performer rather than from the au- 
ditorium's speakers — assuming the 
sound system isn't grossly mis- 
balanced. And, on a cozier level. 
most people have no problem when 
viewing the TV while wearing head- 
phones in placing the dialogue at the 
actors' mouths rather than at the real 
source — directly over their own ears. 

Next month we will look at some of 
the other papers dealing mostly with 
the hardv\7are of audio. R-E 



TELEPHONE LINE 



continued from page 46 



PC type bracket, and cut open- 
ings for Jl and J2. 

Installation 

With the modified bracket in- 
stalled on the card, it is very sim- 
ple to install in an IBM PC or 
clone. All you have to do is locate 
an unused slot in your comput- 
er's expansion bus. Make sure 
the computer is off during the in- 
stallation. Remove the blank 
mounting bracket from the back 
of the computer (if one exists), 
and insert the new card into the 
slot. Install the mounting screw, 
and then plug in the phone line 
and the AC adapter and battery 
backup if used, and you're ready 
to roll. 

Software 

The software is menu driven 
and, in most cases, a single key 
stroke is all It takes to change 
mode or to perform an operation. 
Screen colors are used for high- 
lights, and for separation of 
fields. The only thing you have to 
remember is to type TLC and hit 
return (from the DOS prompt). 
All programming, functions, and 
mode selections thereafter are 
done using menus. (See sources 
box for custom software.) 

The software consists of two 
programs: the operating pro- 
gram and the resident program 
(which are available on the RE- 
BBS— 516-293-2283). The oper- 
ating program runs on the host 
computer and provides the inter- 
face with the controller's hard- 
ware. The resident program is 
what the operating program 
loads into the on-board SRAM. 
The resident program is the actu- 
al program that determines what 
the controller will perform. But it 
is the operating program that is 
used to select, configure, and 
load the resident program. 

User registration cards 

Although the software is not 
copy protected, we strongly rec- 
ommend users to register their ■ 
copies; doing so will automat- 
ically put you on AC&C's mailing 
list. AC&C will inform users of 
new applications software, func- 
tions, and updates. R-E 



82 




l=M'''^t-^H=l-M=< 




This month begins our discussion on control circuitry. 



n^jUMiMimij 



Designing and building elec- 
tronic controllers used to be 
a really difficult job if you 
wanted tfie circuit to have enough 
intelligence to do even fairly complex 
jobs. The reason for that was that 
there weren't any single-component 
solutions to electronic intelligence. 
But when IC's were developed, and 
affordable microprocessors ap- 
peared on the market, things began 
to change dramatically. 

The major change in controllers 
was the home computer in general 
and the marketing of cheap mother- 
boards. That's because all the intel- 
ligence you'd ever need could be 
handled by an eighty dollar clone and 
a bit of software... almost. 

The reason for the "almost" is that, 
even though a cheap PC clone has all 
the brains and memory needed to 
control your home's security system 
or the environmental control system 
of the space shuttle, there's no con- 
venient way to let the computer talk 
to the outside world. 

All home computers have the ca- 
pability of talking to an external de- 
vice since they have to deal with 
video, keyboards, printers, and so 
on. How they do that depends on the 
particular computer since different 
microprocessors handle I/O in their 
own unique and often strangely won- 
derful way Fortunately for all of us, 
just about all of the popular clone 
computers are built around the 
80XXX family — ^from the original 
8080, the Z-80, to the 8088 and its 
more powerful kin, the 80286, 
80386, and whatever other surprises 
Intel comes up with in the future. 

All those microprocessors deal 
with I/O in the same way; through the 
use of only two instructions IN and 
OUT The chip understands that it can 
be told to address two completely 
different kinds of locations: memory 
and ports. If you think of the comput- 
er as being an active controller, the 
former kinds of locations are for 
thinking and the latter are for doing. 



It's really that basic. 

If you look at the pinouts of any of 
the 80XXX family you'll see that 
there's one pin labelled lO/MEM. On 
the 8088, for example, you can see 
that in Fig. 1 on pin 28. That's the 
control pin that lets external circuitry 
know whether the microprocessor is 
doing a memory operation or an I/O 
(port) operation. 

In ordinary use, most people are 



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FIG. 1— LOOKING AT THE PINOUTS of the 
8088, pin 28 (JO/MEM) is the control pin 
that lets external circuitry know whether 
the microprocessor is doing a memory 
operation or an I/O (port) operation. 



happily unaware of what kind of in- 
struction is being executed even 
though both kinds happen all the 
time. Remember that printers, mod- 
ems, mice, joysticks, and so on are all 
treated by the 8088 as I/O devices. 

Interestingly enough, even though 
chips like the 8088 make it easy to 
deal with I/O, designing the circuitry 
to be controlled is always a pain in the 
neck, since even the lowly 8088 can 
handle more than 64,000 different 
port addresses. That means that any- 
thing designed to be driven by the 
8088 has to be able to recognize 
when a particular address shows up 
on the bus — and that means design- 
ing the circuitry necessary to keep an 
eye on as many as sixteen different 
address lines to decode the few that 
you're interested in. 

Some months ago I published the 
details of the Port-A-Matic CRadio- 
Electronics, January and February 
1990) which would decode some of 
the address lines and indicate when 
the 8088 was talking to particular 
ports. If you glance thnDugh the text 
of the article, you'll get an idea of just 
how tedious address decoding can 
really be. 

When you're going to use a store- 
bought computer as the basis for a 
controller it makes a lot of sense to 
see if you can possibly get away with 
not having to do address decoding. 

You need circuitry to create a work- 
ing port. This usually takes the form 
of address decoders, latches, and a 
wad of logical glue to hold the whole 
thing together. If the port you're de- 
signing has any special needs, that 
means even more silicon. An exam- 
ple of that would be something like a 
port aimed specihcally at serial stuff 
where you had to have UART's, tine 
drivers, and so on. w. 

There are several standard port lo- t 
cations in the magical kingdom of g 
cloneland, and I've listed the most a 
popularones in Table 1. Notice, as we i 
just discussed, that most of the ports u 
actually use several sequential port c 



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addresses to handle data, control, 
and status. That is important to keep 
in mind because one of the major 
drawbacks of designing around 
someone else's hardware is that 
things aren't set up the way you'd like 
them to be. 

There are actually two problems: 
The first is that not all the data bits 
may be used, and the second is that 
some of the bits may be designed to 
be either read only or write only. The 
best way to see that is to look at the 
port that's available on most clone 
systems- — LPT1, the main printer 
port. 

Just about every clone board I've 
seen (including the more well-known 
name brands) that provide an LPT1 
port uses the same I/O address 
space. The three I/O ports that go 
into making the printer port are 
03BCh (the data port), 03BDh (the 
status port), and 03BE (the control 
port). The computer uses the data 
bits at those locations as sum- 
marized in Table 2, 

The control port at 03BEh is de- 
signed to be both written to and read 
from, although bits 5, 6, and 7 are 
unused. Bit 4 is used by the port but 
is designed as a hardware flag to en- 
able the interrupt that the computer 
uses to find out whether or not the 
printer can accept data. The bottom 
line is that bit 4 is only used internally 
and doesn't show up on the porl con- 
nector. Keep that in mind because 



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there's no hardware available to get 
the upper four bits out to the external 
world. 

The status port at 03BD is de- 
signed so that there are even more 
restrictions on its use. Not only are 
the first three bits (0, 1, and 2) not 
used (and consequently not sup- 
ported in hardware), but it's only set 
up as an input port. You can read the 
state of some of the bits but there's 
no hardware available to let you write 
to the port. 

The data port at 03BCh, like the 



status port, has restrictions as well. 
All eight bits are used, but the port's 
only configured for output. 

Every one of the boards I've seen 
that has a printer port on it uses some 
kind of a latch near the end of the 
hardware chain making up the data 
port. Usually it's a 74LS373 (boards 
with discreet components), or a 
work-alike latch buried in silicon if the 
board has custom LSI or ASIC chips. 
Data sent to the port at 03BCh will 
stay there until it's either changed or 
cleared by the computer 

It's important to completely under- 
stand the parallel-port setup before 
you start using it as anything other 
than a printer port since not all the 
bits are implemented or designed to 
be both input and output. R-E 



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The long-anticipated release of Windows 3.0 
and ToolBook, a "software construction set." 



JEFF HOLTZMAN 



CO 

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O 



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A few days ago Microsoft fi- 
nally released the long- 
anticipated and much-hyped 
new version of Windows. The compa- 
ny spared no expense in the formal 
product introduction; the initial event 
cost $3 million, and the company will 
spend another $7 million between 
the time when I write this and you 
read it. According to some reports, 
Windows 3.0 represents the culmina- 
tion of a seven-year, $200 million de- 
velopment effort. Clearly, Microsoft 
means business. 

In case you just ennerged from de- 
tention in Siberia, I'll give a brief run- 
down of salient new features. 

The most conspicuous change is in 
the user interface. It is simply 
gorgeous. Mac users will no longer 
be able to sneer at Windows. 

No longer are there separate ver- 
sions of the product for different 
CPU's. The same version of Win- 
dows 3.0 runs on 8088. 80286, and 
80386 processors. However the pro- 
gram runs in different modes (real, 
standard, enhanced, respectively) 
depending on the host processor Of- 
ficially 3.0 will run on an 8088, but a 
286 or better is strongly recom- 
mended. On a recommended pro- 
cessor, 3.0 breaks the 640K memory 
limit. Rather it will when appropriate 
software is released. For the immedi- 
ate future, you must run old Windows 
applications in real mode; however, it 
appears that most vendors of signifi- 
cant Windows applications are 
scrambling to convert their products 
as quickly as possible. The situation 
will undoubtedly ease considerably 
by the time you read this. 

Another immediate problem that 
will undoubtedly be fixed quickly is 
hardware drivers. The program pres- 
ently comes with precious few. For 
example, even though 3,0 recognized 
my Video Seven VRAM VGA card, it 
provided built-in support only for a 
256-color mode at standard resolu- 
tion (640 X 480), not the 800 x 600 
and 1024 x 768 high-res modes. Nor 



would it recognize the Novell drivers 
on my office PC. However, updated 
drivers were available from the ven- 
dors almost immediately. 

In general, the lack of hardware 
support is a problem, but not as great 
a problem as it used to be. because 
3,0 lets you alter your hardware con- 
figuration on the fly With previous 
versions, if you wanted to change 
anything, you had to re-install the 
whole package, possibly wiping out 
important setup information in the 
process. Now hardware and software 
upgrades will be easy to accommo- 
date. 

Most of the applications that come 
with Windows have been upgraded. 
For example, the terminal program 
now does XMODEM and Kermit file 
transfers, the calculator now has sci- 
entific and programmer functions, 
the clock now has both analog and 
digital displays, a macro recorder is 
now included, a solitaire game has 



been added, etc. In addition, the Win- 
dows environment itself is now 
customizable. You can use one of 
several predefined background pat- 
terns, or create your own, or create 
Cor scan in) an image to use as "w/all- 
paper." 

Microsoft has finally disposed of 
the clunky old MS-DOS Executive; 
the new Program and Task managers 
(which bear strong resemblance to 
the corresponding OS/2 functions) 
provide a visual approach to running 
programs. The File Manager (which 
resembles that in DOS 4.0) provides 
a much more intuitive means of copy- 
ing, moving, deleting, and searching 
for files than the old MS-DOS ex- 
ecutive. Windows now also provides 
a significant interface for network 
users. 

As for hardware, Microsoft has 
tried to position Windows as needing 
a 286 + 2MB of RAM versus 0S/2s 
386 -I- 4MB. From what I can tell, 




FIG. 1 



88 



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those distinctions are driven by the 
marketing folks, not the technical 
people, A desktop publisher running 
PageMaker or a heavy-duty financial 
analyst running Excel simply needs all 
the memory, hard disk, and CPU 
speed he or she can possibly obtain. 
On the other hand, the average user 
might go a long way using just the 
built-in applications. 

On a 386. Windows now (finally!) 
lets you run several non-Windows ap- 
plications simultaneously in an effi- 
cient manner. 

At long last the documentation in- 
cludes useful information on setup 
and configuration. I drastically in- 
creased performance of a 3MB Dell 
System 300 by setting up a dedi- 
cated swap area on disk, as de- 
scribed in Chapter 13 of the User's 
Guide. 

What's it all mean? 

By itself, none of the built-in Win- 
dows applications can compete with 
any serious DOS product. But the 
Windows apps work together as a 
group very well. And that's one thing 
that vaulted the Mac to its place of 
eminence. 

When you stop looking at Win- 
dows as a DOS add-on or com- 
petitor, but as a product in its own 
right, it takes on a new glow of its 
own. 

You might compare Windows 3.0 



to everything-but-the-kitchen-sink 
programs like Sidekick Plus and PC 
Tools. Actually, those are not pro- 
grams but nearly complete environ- 
ments that contain most of the tools 
the average DOS user needs to ac- 
complish daily tasks. Windows 3.0 
provides similar functionality, but one 
that is couched in a sparkling user 
Interface, and is built around an archi- 
tecture that can accommodate user 
evolution. 

I think 3.0 is going to be a wildly 
successful product, for several very 
good reasons: 

• Unlike OS/2, Windows has signifi- 
cant applications (Excel, Ami, Word, 
PageMaker. Corel Draw, Designer, 
Crosstalk) available now in all applica- 
tion categories except database 
management. 

ITEMS DISCUSSED 

• Windows 3,0 ($149, upgrade $50 
+ $5.50 S/H), Microsoft Corp, 16011 
NE 36th Way, Box 97017, Redmond, 
WA 98073-9717. (206) 882-8080. 
Upgrades: (800) 323-3577, 

CIRCLE 11 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



• ToolBook 1.0 ($395), Asymetrix 
Corp., 110 110th Avenue NE, Suite 
717, Bellevue, WA 98004. (206) 
462-0501. Orders; (800) 624-8999, 
ext. 299H. 

CIRCLE 12 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



• The industry hasn't seen such a 
high level of end-user interest in a 
product in years. 

• The enhanced user interface is go- 
ing to attract users in a way that pre- 
vious versions were unable to 
duplicate (and that DOS never could). 

• The ability to write programs that 
can cleanly access 16MB of memory 
will attract developers. 

• The ease of setup and reconfigura- 
tion will attract corporate managers 
and tech support people. 

• And rumors still persist about 
IBM's pending introduction of a low- 
cost "multimedia" home PC, for 
which Windows 3.0 would be the per- 
fect operating environment. Maybe it 
will turn out to be the elusive PC "for 
the rest of us" that Apple has pro- 
moted but not properly marketed for 
so long. 

By the time you read this, much of 
the smoke will have cleared. Mean- 
while, it's going to be an interesting 
summer 

ToolBook tames Windows 

First out of the starting gate is not a 
revamped version of an old Windows 

product, but a brand-new one called </ 

ToolBook. If the word HyperCard ^ 

means anything to you, then you'll n 

have some idea of what ToolBook is f 

about. S 

ToolBook is billed as "a software i 

construction set." It consists of a set c 



^ 



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o 

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H 
O 
LU 
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LLI 

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90 



of tools that let you build applications 
by designing screens and linking 
thenn to one another Tools include a 
graphics editor and a programming 
language called OpenScript. The edi- 
tor allows you to create buttons that, 
when selected on-screen, cause 
something to happen. What happens 
depends on scripts you write. The 
script language provides a rich en- 
vironment for programming, as it In- 
cludes full control structures Cif/then/ 
else, case, do while, do until, etc.), a 
single-stepping debugger, a macro 
recorder, and hundreds of functions. 

Writing programs for ToolBook is 
not like writing BASIC, Pascal, or C 
programs. Rather, OpenScript is an 
object-oriented nnessage-passing 
language, just like the underlying 
Windows architecture (and OS/2 as 
well). However, once you start wrap- 
ping your mind around that concept, 
you find that development is no more 
difficult than in a traditional lan- 
guage — in fact, it's a good deal easi- 
er, because many of the grubby, low- 
level details are hidden from view. 
ToolBook comes with many sample 
scripts to help you get started. In ad- 
dition, at least one company CHeizer 
Software of Pleasant Hill. CA) has 
announced a program that will con- 
vert HyperCard stacks to ToolBook 
format. 

One extremely powerful facet of 
OpenScript is that it's extensible. 
You'll have to understand low- level 
Windows programming to do so, but 
the results could well be worth it. 
Suppose, for example, that you had 
developed a six-voice stereo music 
synthesizer and you wanted to build 
the user interface for it in ToolBook. 
You would write a dynamic link library 
(DLL) to control the hardware, link it 
to ToolBook, and get to work. 

Windows 3.0 is currently shipping 
with a sample ToolBook application 
called DayBook. which provides a 
highly intuitive set of daily, weekly, 
and monthly calendars that provide 
time- and contact-management func- 
tions like some DOS-based desktop 
organizers. 

The only sad thing about ToolBook 
is its price: about $400. By contrast. 
Apple includes a copy of HyperCard 
free with every Mac. 

If you're looking for a w/ay to get 
into Windows programming, but with- 
out incurring the extraordinary learn- 
ing cur^/e involved. ToolBook is the 
way to go. R-E 



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3460 Hiltview Avenue 

Palo Alto, CA 94304 

(415) 858-2700 

CIRCLE 243 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Electronic Goldmine 

Box 5408 

Scottsdale, A2 85261 
(602) 451-6454 

CIRCLE 244 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



IH & A Industries 

Route 2 
Box 35E 
Bowling Green, MO 63334 

CIRCLE 245 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



Heathkit 

Box 1288 

Benton Harbor, Ml 49022 

(616) 982-3200 

CIRCLE 246 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Lindsay Publications 

Box 12 

Bradley. IL 60915 

(815) 468-3668 

CIRCLE 247 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Micro Linear 

2092 Concourse Drive 
San Jose, CA 95131 
(408) 433-5200 

CIRCLE 24S ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Rare Earth Resources sidebar 

This is all so new and so hot (Uh — 
better make that so coldi that I don't 
have too much for you beyond these 
key papers of Fig. 4. One very de- 
tailed and thorough but ridiculously 



^ 



Micron 

2805 East Columbia Road 
Boise, ID 83706 
(408) 433-5200 

CIRCLE 249 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

National Semiconductor 

475 Ellis Street 
Mountain View, CA 94043 
(800) 632-3531 

CIRCLE 2S0 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

SGS-Thompson 

1000 East Bell Road 
Phoenix, AZ 85022 
(602) 867-6259 

CIRCLE 2S1 ON FREE INFORMATION CARI 




Sltort Circuits 

Box 285 

Bamegat. NJ 08005 
(609) 698-3080 

CIRCLE 252 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Signetics/Philips 

811 East Argues Avenue 
Sunnyvale, CA 94088 
(408) 991-2000 

CIRCLE 253 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Synergetics 

Box 809 

Thatcher, AZ 85552 

(602) 428-4073 

CIRCLE 254 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Technical Insights 

Box 1304 

Fort Lee, NJ 07024 

(201) 568-4744 

CIRCLE 255 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Tesia Book Company 

Box 1649 

Greenville, TX 75403 
(214) 454-6819 

CIRCLE 2S6 ONFREEINFORMATIONCARD 



UMI 

300 North Zeeb Road 
Ann Arbor, Ml 48106 
(800) 521-3044 

CIRCLE 257 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



MCARD 



Synergetics 

Box 809 

Thatcher, AZ 85552 

(602) 428-4073 

CIRCLE 258 ONFREEINFORMATIONCARD 

this when I actually get the papers 
and can do some hacking of my own. 

An audio voltmeter 

Signetics has an intriguing cellular 
continued on page 92 



MARKET CENTER 



FOR SALE 



jREATbuys! Surplus prices, ICs, linears, transfor- 
ners, PS, stepping motors, vacuum pump, 
jhototransistor, meters, LSASE. FERTIK'S, 5400 
Ella, Phtla., PA 19120. 

DESCRAMBLERS. All brands. Special: Combo 
Jerrold 400 and SB3 S16S.00. Complete cable de- 
scrambler kit $39.00- Complete satellite de- 
scrambler kit $45.00. Free catalog. MJM 
INDUSTRY, Box 531, Bronx, NY 10461-0208. 

T.V. notch filters, surveillance equipment, brochure 
$1.00, D.K. VIDEO, Box 63/6025, Margate, FL 
33063. (305) 752-9a0£. 

TUBES: "oldest," "latest." Parts, components, 
sctiematics. SASE for list. STEINMET2, 7519 
Maplewood Ave., RE, Hammond. IN 46324. 

ENGINEERING software, PC/MSDOS. Hob- 
byists — students — engineers. Circuit de- 
sign $49.00, PCB layout $99,00, Logic 
simulation $29.00, FFT analysis $69.00, 
Mathematics $39.00, Circuit analysis 
$29.00. Call or write for free catalog. (614) 
491-0832, BSOFT SOFTWARE, 444 Colton 
Rd., Columbus, OH 43207. 

RESTRICTED technical intornnatton: Electronic sur- 
veillance, schematics, locksmithing, covert sci- 
ences, hacking, etc. Huge selection. Free 
brochures, MENTOR-Z, Drawer 1549, Asbury 
Park, NJ 07712 



WIRELESS CABLE RECEIVERS 1.9 TO 2.7 GHz 






Jtf Ln PWKHDtfl.EL' DI^M 5 r STEM SI79.9Q 

3OCBR0OANTENNflSY3TEM S193.90 

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lt(12|23t-0eu VIDEO PMmitrs 

DUtKntr DISCOUNTS LIFETIME WKHRMITr 

Mcnass Of ni£ mnn lasmss smuu 



TO COM VIP converters w/remote from $199.00 
Tocomsuperchipsturnon everyth ing,$69.00each. 
Phone <219) 935-4128. 

BRAND name computers from $299.00 factory 
fresh complete systems, IBM, Laser, Emerson, 
Closeouts, DIGITECH. (602) 722-4215. 

DESIGN PLDs on IBM/PC, two 360K disks w/ap- 
plication book. Parts and prooramming services 
available. $10.00 postpaid. B. LEWIS, PO Box 223, 
Palm Harbor, FL 34692. 

DESCRAM8LSRS — converters, fr«e intorma- 
tion and price list, whotesaie prices, SASE, 
S.A.C., 4112 N. Simmons, N. Las Vegas. NV 
89030. 

PHOTOQUICKZB, single board computer with pro- 
totype area, $69.00. SOFTWARE SCIENCE, 3750 

Houndbottom Road, Cincinnati, OH 45244. (513) 
561-2060. 

CABLE TV converters: Jerrold, Oak, Scientific At- 
lantic, Zenith & many others. "New MTS" stereo 
add-on: mute & volume. Ideal for 400 and 450 
cwners! 1 (800) 826-7623, Amex, Visa, M/C accept- 
ed. B & B INC., 4030 Beau-D-Rue Drive, Eagan. 
MN 5512a. 

TUBES, nev^, up to 90% off, SASE. KIRBY, 298 
West Carmel Drive, Carmei. IN 46032. 

PROGRAMMABLE stepper motor drive & control 
(or under $100. IBM PC.'XT compalible. Com- 
modore 64, or other with 25 pin parallel port. PCB, 
interface, & software. Send for detailed literature to: 
MASE, R.D. *2 Box 166. Mohrsville, PA 19541. 

FREE catalog. Interfaces for IBM compatibles. Dig- 
ital I/O and analog input. Control relays, motors, 
lights, measure temperature, voltage. JOHN BELL 
ENGINEERING, INC., 400 Oxford Way Belmont, 
CA 94002. (415) 592-8411. 



RENTAL movie stabilizer. Connect between VCRs 
or 10 monitor. Satisfaction guaranteed. $69.95, 
$4.00 handling. 1 (800) 367-7909. 
CABLE descramblers (Jerrald) fromS40.00. Tocom 
VIP test chip. Fully activates unil. $50.00. Call (213) 
867-0081. 

PRINTED circuit boards etched & drilled. Free deliv- 
ery K& FELECTRONICS, INC., 33041 Groestjeck, 
Fraser. Ml 43026. (313) 294-3720. 

T.V, converter descramblers, wholesale to all, 
Tocoms, Zeniths, Oaks, tHamlin, Jerrold, SA. COD 
orders accepted. S.A.C., info (702) 647-3799, or- 
ders 1 (800) 622-3799. 

LASERS. Imw 1o 2kw, worlds largest selection of 
new & used surplus. F^ree catalog. MWK INDUS- 
TRIES, 1269 Pomona Road, Corona, CA 91720. 
(714) 278-0563. 



FREE CATALOG 



FAMOUS "RRESTIK" BRAND CS ANTENNAS 

AND ACCESSORIES. QUALITY PRODUCTS 

FOR THE SERIOUS CB'er. SINCE 19G2 



FIRESTIK ANTENNA COMPANY 

2614 EAST ADAMS 
PHOENIX, ARIZONA 85034 



TEST equipment pre-owned now at affordable 
prices. Signal generators from S50.00. Os- 
cilloscopes from $50.00. Other equipment, includ- 
ing manuals available. Send $1.00 for catalog, 
refund on 1st order. J.B. ELECTRONICS, 3446 De- 
mpster, Skokie, IL 60076. (708) 982-1973. 

CABLE-TV Scientific Atlanta 8580 Qly^price each 
1/289, 5/249. 10/239, 6PM 10 10PM EDT weekdays, 
(301) 791-5019. No Maryland orders accepted. 

DESCRAMBLERS: dealers! We have new Z-Tac 
descramblers, only SI 85 .00 in 10 lots, with other 
systems available. 1 (800) 69S-CABL. 



MINIATURE electronics like James Bond. Catalog 
S4.00, refundable. F 4 P ENTERPRISES, Box 
51272, Palo Alto, CA 94303-L 



Quality Microwave TV Antennas 



I WIRELESS CABli-1 910 2.7 0112 40dtJ Gain [ . ) 
1 36-Ctiaiinel Syslcm CDrrplele $149.9S 
|12-Ctiantiel System Complete S114.95 
I Call or Write for "FREE" Calalog 

Phllllps-Tecti Electronics 

P.O. Boi S533 < ScDttsdale, U 85352 

LIFETIME (602)947-T7D0lt3.D0Cnilli)ll glim Kdinli 
WARRANTY WiilftftUrJ * Viu ' COD't Quainiiv l^jkiim 



CABLE descramblers, all brands In stock, wholsale 
prices to retail customers, CO.D. orders accepted. 
MOUNT HOOD ELECTRONICS (206) 896-6837. 

LOTTERY - IBM computer disk for all lotteries 
$10.00. ROBERTS, BOX 63.'6025, Margate, FL 

33063. _____^ 

OAK Sigma descrambier, channel 3 output, rare 
hard-to-iind factory equipment, with free documen- 
tation, $150.00. Oak Sigma modification documen- 
tation $20.00 postpaid. Oak VN12-4 (or Hamlin) 
descramblers with free remote control converler, 
$85.00. Eagle remote control converter de- 
scrambler combos, $100.00. Send moneyorder, 
ship postpaid within 3 days. SURPLUS ELEC- 
TRONICS, PCB 10009, Colorado Springs. CO 
80932. 



CB RADIO OWNERS! 



We specialize in a wide variety of technical 
information, parts and services for CB radios. 
10- Meter and FM conversion kits, repair books, 
plans, high-performance accessories. Thousards 
of satisfied customers since 197S! Catalog $2. 



CBC INTERNATIONAL 

P.O. BOX 31SaORE, PHOENIX, AZ ZBW% 



CABLE TV DESCRAMBLERS! 

BARGAIN HEADQUARTERS! 



»> 



•JERROLD™ •TOCOM •HAti^LIN 

•OAK 'ZENITH 

•SCIENTIFIC ATLANTA 

6 month warranty! We stiip C.O.D.! 
Lowest retail/wholesale prices! 

FREE CATALOG: 

Global Cable Network 

1032 Irving St. Suite 109 

S.F., CA 94122 
NO CALIFORNIA SALESII! 

ORDER TODAY! 800-327-8544 



CABLE TV converters and descramblers liq- 
uidation! Zenith, Tocom, Hamlin, Oak, Jer- 
rald, Scientillc Atlanta. Quantity djcount! 
Order now Visa/MC/CO0 1 (SOO) 962-6836. 

SURPLUS electronics, motors, speakers, power 
supplies, adapters, etc... send for free catalog. 
WINDSOR DISTRIBUTORS, 19 Freeman Street 
Newark. NJ 07105. _^^_^_^ 

CA8L£ TV converters and descramtilers. 
Vte sell only the best, low prices. SB-3 
S79.fl0, We ship CO.D. Free catatag, ACE 
PRODUCTS, FO Box 582, Dept. E, Saco, ME 
04072. 1 (800) 234-0726. 



FREE CATALOG! 
1-800-648-7938 

For all information 1.702-362-9026 

JERROLD HAMLIN OAK ETC. 

CABLE TV 
DESCRAMBLERS 

■ Compare our low Low Retail Prices! 
■ Guaranteed Prices & Warranties! 

• Orders Shipped Immediately! 
REPUBLIC CABLE PRODUCTS INC. 
408D Paratlise Rd. ?15 Depl. HE-90 
' Las Wegas, NV 89109 — 



CABLE TV DESCRAMBLERS 

CABLE TV converters and descramblers bar- 
gain headquarters! Jerrold, Tocom, Zenith, 
Hamiin, Scientific Atlanta. Oak M35B only 
S60.00. Free Catalog! GCN, 1032 Irving 
Street #109, San Francisco, CA 94122. 
Order now! Visa/MC/CODl (800) 327-8544, 



CO 

m 

:^ 

m 
m. 

00 
m 

(O 

to 
o 



91 



3 FORI 
SPECIAL 

ON SUB-MINIATURE VOICE 
FM TRANSMITTERS. 

KITS CONTAIN PC BOARDS 




■FMX-1 LONG RANGE (3 Ml) ULTRASENSITIVE 

FM VOICE XMTR with fine tune, range control 
plus— SSA 50 




•TELX-1 TELEPHONE FM XMTR (3 Ml) auto- 
matically operates when phone is used Crystal 
deaf clari^ with fine tune and range control. 
Non detectable S34.S0 




•ATR-1 AUTOMATIC TELEPHONE RECORDING 
DEVICE tapes telephone conversation all 
automalically 51950 



ALL THREE OF ABOVE FOR $69,50 



CALL OR SEND VISA, MASTER CHARGE, 
MONEY ORDER, ETC. TO AMAZING CONCEPTS, 
BOX 716, AMHERST, NH 03031. {603} 673-4730. 



HARDWARE HACKER 



continued from page 90 



radio log-amplifier chip in their NE604 
and described in their new ap-note 
AN-1991. Figune 5 shows you how to 
use this chip to build an audio level 
meter usable over an incredible to 
— 80 dBm decibel range. It accepts 
audio levels as low as ten microvolts, 
and should be useful for speaker and 
microphone testing, as well as for a 
receiver "S" meter. 

Reasonably priced and wide-range 
log amps are a rarity, so this is a 
welcome chip. Be sure to let me know 
what other uses you can come up 
with for this gem. 

New tech literature 

Three free new data books fram 
SGS do include their Power Bipolar 
Transistors. Zener and Rectifier Di- 
odes, and their new 1990 Shortform 
Catalog. From Micrvn, a MOS Data 
Baot< mainly on static and dynamic 
memories. From Micro Linear, a 1990 
Data Book has just come out featur- 
ing A/D, D/A, telecomm, and power- 
supply circuits. And, speaking of tele- 



CABLE TV 



TB-3 (TrI-Bi) or SA-3 

Quantity Prices 



10 



20 



$48. $43 



Each 



50 



Each 



100 



^«S9a ^w3b 



Each 



Each 



Hours open 10:00 am to 4:00 pm Eastern time 

Minimum order 5 units 55.00 ea. 

Dealers wanted. We ship COD, 

King Wholesale 

1-800-729-0036 

Fax number 6173400053 

'Wo one beats the King's prices!" 



DESCRAMBLERS 



Try the 

KNtrwIos 

bulletin tioard 
system 

(RE'BBS) 
516-293-2283 



T)ie more you use It the 
more useful it tieconies. 

We support 300 and 1200 
tlaud operalian. 

Patamelers: SNI (8 data 
tits, no partly, 1 slop bit) 
ar TE1 (T data bits, even 
parity, 1 slop bit). 

Add yaursaif to aur user 
tiles lo Increase your 
access. 

Communicate with other 
R-E readers. 

Leave yout comments on 
H.E with Itie SYSOP- 



RE'BBS 
516-293-2283 



comm, be sure to pick up the new 
Telecommunications Data Book from 
National. 

Two hacker surplus sources with 
ultra-low prices include Short Cir- 
cuits and the Electronic Goldmine. 

Automotive Electronics is a very 
interesting new trade journal, while 
Electronic Components and Applica- 
tions is an outstanding quarterly tech 
journal from Philips. The cost is a tad 
high at $20 per year for what should 
be a free house organ. The latest 
issue includes info on solid-state visi- 
ble laser diodes, pagers, phase-lock 
loop circuits, and oscilloscope tubes. 

Our free mechanical samples this 
month include Alumilite, an easily 
castable urethane that sets in three 
minutes and easily holds small de- 
tails; and the Cycle-Flex mechanical 
drive cables and fittings from CMA. 

Turning to my own products, I do 
have complete autographed sets of 
book-on-demand published Hard- 
ware Hacker II reprints for all my Ra- 
dio-Electronics columns here 
waiting just for you. And, for more 
information on self-directed re- 
search, check into my Incredible Se- 
cret Money Machine. 

Finally, I do have a new and free 
mailer for you which includes dozens 
of insider hardware hacking secret 
sources. Write or call for info. 

Our usual reminder here that most 
of the items mentioned appear either 
in the Names and Numbers or the 
Rare Earth Resources sidebars. 

As always, this is your column and 
you can get technical help and off- 
the-wall networking per that Need 
Help? box. The best calling times are 
weekdays 8-5 in Mountain Standard 
Time. Let's hear from you. R-E 




Megahertz... thal's when sometliing 
h really painful. 



92 



NEW HE NE 
LASER TUBES $35 

Dealer Inquiries invited. 
Free Catalog! 

MEREDITH INyraUMENTS: 6403 N. 59lh Ave. 

Glerdale, AZ 85301 • (602) 934-93S7 

*^Thi S&iirct fur Lojtr Surplus" 



w 



PLANS AND KITS 



BUILD this five-digit panei meter and square-wave 
generator including an ohms, capacitance and fre- 
quency meter. Detailed instructions $2.50. BAG- 
NALL ELECTRONICS, 179 May, Fairfield, CT 
06430. 

MINIATURE FM transmitters! Tracking transmit- 
ters! Voice disguisersf Bug d electors [ Phone De- 
vices! More! Available in kils or assembled! Catalog 
$2.00: XANDI ELECTRONICS, Box 25647, Dept. 
60H, Tempe. AZ B5285-5647. 

CATALOG: hobt>y/broadcasting/HAMfCB: Cable 

TV, transmitters, amplifiers, surveillance devices, 
computers, more! PANAXIS, Box 130-F9. Para- 
dise, CA 95967. 




DETAILED PLANS 



TV-SCOPE 



Dm iua 

PA 17TD1 



FINALLY! 



An 1ntir«ittng tnd borth- 
Hh11« projict. Thta EASV- 
TO-DUILD circuit 1>u you 
use Any rasu^ar TV tmt «3 
■ llapK OeCILLOSOOPC. 
no ■odlffc.ttori to TVl 
Tiny, flv buttery EKMvrad* 
GMl *nywh»r»J Orttor TWWl 
Alt far our FREE CATALOO 
Of ot^«r ptnns irtd kitil 




CB Tricks II book. Power amplifier design and theo- 
ry, UHF CBtune ups. Servd $19.95 MEDICINE MAN 
CB, PO Box 37, Ciarksville, AR 72630. 

STRANGE Stuff. Get the advantage! Laser listener, 
surveillance, descrambling, underground informa- 
tion. Plans, kits, complete items. Informational 
package $3.00 refundable. OtRI JO/BOND, Box 
212, Lowell, N.C. 28098. 

LASER lighting entertainment systems. Create 
your own 3-dimensional laser light shows. Detailed 
mechanical and electrical schematics, scanning 
and control operations. $20.00. MILLENNIUM, 229 
McAle« Court, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360. 

RECEIVE all cordless telephones on your police 
scanner $5.00 and SASE gets frequencies. FRE- 
QUENCIES, PO Box 550, Tiverton, HI 02878. 



I fREMOTE CONTROL KEYCHAIN 

Complete w/mini-1ransmltlBr 
and +5 vdc RF receiver 

Fully assemblBd includirvg plana 
to build yo^r own auto alarm 
Quantify discounts available 

d*^y1 r\c Check, Visa or M/C 
$i:4.y0 Add $ 3 shipping 

VtSITECT INC, /Dopt, R (415) 872-0128 
POBOX5442,SO.SAMFRAN.,GA040fiO 



TRANSFORMERS. Learn to build your own. Easy 
Smart. Send SI 00 (refundable). W. CHARLES 
TECHNOLOGIES, 28740 S.W. Parkway #A1, 
Wilsonville, OR 97070. 

ETCH your own printed circuit boards using the 
photographic method. The only inexpensive step- 
by- step process that guarantees professional re- 
sults. A book that every serious electronics hobbyist 
should have. Send $12.95 to ETCHING INFO, PO 
Box 8064, Westfield, MA Q1O86-S064. 

DAZER personal protection device kit $44,95. Ex- 
citing unique kits catalog $1.00. QUANTUM RE- 
SEARCH, 17919-77 Ave., Edmonton, Alberta TST 
281. 

BUILD this 400w stereo amplifier designed for 
mobile systems. Super nice. Plans $6.00. MD 
ELECTRONICS, Box 2208, Zephyrhills, FL 33539. 

HIGH qualfty Duophonic synthesizer, digital delay 
3 -way crossover, equalizer, Mosfet 200w amp, 
$10.00 each. For guitar or P.A. QEBHARDT, Box 
754, Anaconda, MT 59711. 



CABLE-TV 




JTatch-Vw'H^l^ 



wellTetaii- 



/ER^'£ 



eo n^J 




BONANZA! 



•CALL fOK AV*IL*8IUTV 



Name 

Address . 
State 



-City. 



-Zip. 



a Cashier's Check 

Acct# 

Signature 



D Money Order 



-Phone Number ( ) 
D COD n Visa 
Exp. Date 



ITEM 


1 
UNIT 


ID on 


HAMLIN UCC ^(OOIJ 36 CORDED HEMOTE CONVERTf R .C" i.it.ly. 


?9 00 


1BD0 


PANASONIC WIRELESS CONVERTER IQiii Scs^ Buy. 


93 00 


79 00 


STAR G.ATE 2000 


as 00 


69 00 


■JEHHOLD 4[)0 combo 


169 OC 


11900 


JERROLDJOO HAND REMOTE CONTROL 


29 00 


18 00 


■JERHOLO.l50COMeO 


199 OC 


139 00 


■JERROLD 450 H.AND REMOTE CONTROL 


19 00 


18 00 


JEHHOLD SB-ADD-ON 


99 00 


63 00 


•JERftOLO SB-ADD-ON WITH TRIMODE 


109 IX! 


75 00 


■M,3ie COMBO UNIT iCn 3 output only. 


99 CX] 


70 00 


■M-3Se COMBO UNIT WITHVARISYNC 


109 00 


75 OO 


■MINICODE lN-121 


99 00 


62 00 


■MINICODE |N-1?I WITH VABISVNC 


109 00 


65 00 


•MINICODE VAR1SVNC WtTH AUTO ON-OFF 


1J5D0 


105 00 


ECONOCODE irr,nicodc 5uf)Slit8rl<'i 


69 00 


i?m 


ECONOCODE WITH VAHISVNC 


79 00 


.16 00 


■MLDl![)0.j iCn aoutpuli 


99 00 


62 00 


■MLD-1200-; iCn Joutpiiii 


99 OC: 


62 00 


ZENITH SSAVI CABLE READY 


irtoo 


125 00 


INTERFERENCE HLTERS 'C" Sonlyi 


■JiOB 


IJOO 


■EAGLE PD-3DESCRAMBLEft rCM :trn,l >i,ily 


119 00 


6S00 


■SCIENTIFIC ATLANTA ADD-ON REPLACEMENT OESCRAMBLES 


119 00 


85 00 



Quantity 


Hem 


Output 
Channel 


Price 
Each 


TOTAL 
PRICE 






























































California Penal Code #593-D forbids us 


SUBTOTAL 




from shipping any cable descrambling unit 
to anyone residing in the state ot California, 

Prices subject lo change without notice. 


Shipping Add 
$3.00 per unit 




COD & Credit 
Cards - Add 5% 




PLEASE PRI^^■ 


TOTAL 





□ Mastercard 



i 

8 

3 

m 

3 



FOR OUR RECORDS: 
DCOJUUmON OF MrmomZED use — t. me unaarvgnta. no rwnby dscive undv pvnity ol peiiury 
V^«t «JI products purchAlvd. ixnv and in Itv luTurs. will oniy b« u9«d DO cabto TV lyAtAma with propor 
■uttwrizAtlon from tocal officdlt or cAb4A cofnp«n^ af^ctalB in accordsnc? witfi all applicable laderar and 
I«*la Ivn. FtDCUL AMD WUUOUC STATE LAWS ntOWIDE FOR SUSSTANTIAL CMHIHAL AHb CIVIL 
KNALHeS KM UMN/THOtUZlD UtC 



Pacific Cable Company, Inc. 

7325V2 RESEDA BLVD,, DEPT. R 9 • RESEDA, CA 91335 
(818)716-5914 « No Collect Calls • (818)716-5140 



IMPORTANT: WHEN CALLING FOR INFORMATION 

Please have Ihe make and model « of the equipmeni used in your area. Thank You 



CONSOLIDATED 







THE ULTIMATE 

ELECTRONICS 

CATALOG 



Order youf 260 page catalog and price Uit with over 
14,000 moiity laving electmnii: parU >nd equipmentl 
Sand t^.OO in a check or money crder^ or caU 
1-S06-543-SS6S today and use your Maitercard or Vita. 
Consolidated ElecU^tnic*^ Incorporated 
70S Watervtiet Ave. , Dayton, QUa 4E120-2699 



Najae_ 
Addreit. 



_3tate_ 



-ap_ 



CIRCLE 70 ON FHEE INFORMATION CARD 



DIGITAL V.O.M./D.P.M. 
SALES— SERVI CE— PA RTS 



FLUKE-BECKMAN-SIMPSON-ETC. 

U.S. MADE ONLY. OUOTATION PRIOR TO WORK. FAST 
SERVICE. 90 DAY WARflANTV STANDARDS 
TRACEABLE TO NBS. SINCE 1948. CALIBRATION 
CERTIFICATE AVAILABLE 

INDUSTRIAL INSTRUMENT WKS. INC. 
5746SALMEN, HAHAHAN, LA 70123 6(M'733'e3S5 



PROJECTION TV. Convert your TV lo project 7 too! 
picture.,. Easy... Results corrparable to $2,5000 
projectors... Plans and 8" tens S27,95.„ Profes- 
sional systems available... Illustrated catalog free... 
MACROCOMA, 15GA Main Street, Washington 
Crossing, PA 18977. Creditcard orders 24Hrs, (215) 
736-3979. 



CABLE TV 

DESCRAMBLER LIQUIDATION! 



• Major Makes & Models! 

• Will match or beat anyone's prices! 

• Dealer discounts at 5 units! 

• Examples: 

HAMLIN COMBOS $44 ea, (Min. 5) 

OAK ADD/ON $40 ea. (Min. 5) 

OAK M3SB $60 ea. (Min. 5) 



WEST COAST ELECTRONICS 

For Information: 818-709-1758 
Catalogs & Orders: 800-628-9656 



DEVICES unavailable in USA. Kits, parts, plans 
Catalog $2.00 WORDWAND, 612 Orange Slfoet, 
Palm Harbor, FL 34683. 

KITS — alarms, games, and test equipment. Send 
$1.00 tor catalog. RAKJAB, PO Box 1875. Apopka, 
FL 32704. 



CABLE T V 
"BOXES" 

Converters — Oescramblers 
Remote Controls— Accessories 

* Guaranteed Best Pnces * 

* 1 Vear Warranty -CO D s • 

* Immediate Shipping * 

* FREE CATALOG . 

Csllor Write 

TRANS-WORLD CABLE CO. 

1206J Souitiwest 1 17ih Coun, Suiie i!6 

Miami. Florida 33186 

I ieoOM2-9333 



SURVEILLANCE transmitter kits! Four models of 
each; telephone, room, corrbination telephone/ 
room transmitters tune from 65 to 305 MHz. Calatog 
with Popular Communications and Popular 
Electronics book reviews of "Electronic Eaves- 
dropping Equipment Design," $1.00. 
SHEFFIELD ELECTRONICS, 7223 Stony Island 
Ave.. Chicago, IL 60649-2806. 

INVESTIGATORS, experimenters — Quality plans. 
Micro and restricted devices. Free catalog.. Self ad- 
dressed stamped envelope required K EL LEY SE- 
CURITY INC., Suite 90, 2531 Sawlelte Blvd., Los 
Angeles, CA 90064. 

FREE laser catalog lightshows, pointers, hologra- 
phy, etc. lowest prices! Write to: MIDWEST 
LASER PRODUCTS, PO Box 2187, Bridgeview, IL 
604S5 or call (708) 403-6984. 

PCfTV Interface — RGB to TV/video/ VCR. Switch- 
able between PC and composite video inputs. 
Channels 3 or 4, RF output. Complete PC card kits 
$59.95. PC board onlv $19.95 Mass residents add 
5% sales tax. INOVONICS CORP. 9 Bartlett St., 
Dept. 36, Andover, MA 01810. 



Only A Few Days Left! 



There are only a few days left in August and that Is when our Super Special 13th 
Anniversary Sale on one of the broadest lines of Digital Semiconductors ends. 
Imagine PRIME Integrated Circuits for as low as 10 cents each! And for this sale, 
we didn't Just pick a few components to serve as "Loss Leaders," but we cut prices 
on more than 500 items from the 74LS, 74HC, 74HCT, 4000 CMOS and Z80 
Microprocessor Families in our inventory. Results: Prices so low that no other 
supplier can dare to come close to. Even our normal "Lower-Than-Anyone-Else" 
Prices for these products will be at least 20% higher after this sale is overl So, you 
can afford to stock up on what you need for the next several months now and still 
be money ahead in the future. For a complete listing of all the items on sale refer 
to the last issue of Radio Electronics. But please hiirry because our Sale will 
Absolutely end on August 31st, 1990. 



CO 

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International 
x^omponents 
(corporation 



For a FREE copy of otir New Catalog (Available Mid October), 
please circle Reader Service Card. 

1803 N,W, Uncoln Way • Toledo, OR 97391 
PHONE (All 60 States & Canada); 1-800-325-0101 
FAX; (503) 336-4400 • Hours: 6;00 AM - 6;00 PM PST 




CIRCLE 187 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



ABLE TV EQUIPMENT 



ConventiTs, Remtxe Controls, 
Dcscrarablers, CD Players. 




RROLD-OAKSCIENTIFIC ATLANTA- HAMLIN 

ZENITH MANY MORE CALL TODAY! 

V Only quality products sold V Easy to use 

'Satisfacdon guAramccd V Kjiowledgeablc sales suff 

V Most orders shipped within 24 houi3 

:all for your free catalog 
1-800-228-7404 

MAKE THE CONNECTION 
WITH 



NL-TEK EIJCCTROMCS | 



51 M Balcones Wood DrJSO? I>q)t.298 
Austin. TX.7S759 




FUUK 



'SUPERS 
SALE 



Model 
73 
7S 
77 

■ ■□ 

■ D« 

a 



S68 
$99 
$135 



Mudel 
83 



VISA 



Si 80 
85 $208 

87 $246 

KELVIN Electronics 
7 Fsirchild Ave.. Pfa in view, NV M&03 
(516) 349-7 S20 1 (BOO] E4S-9212 




SURVEILLANCE — audio/wideo equipment — de- 
bugging. Industrial or private. 500 item catalog 
$7.00. SECURITY SYSTEMS, 3017G Hudson, 
New Orleans, LA 70131. 



CABLE DE5CRAMBLERS 
OAK M3eB COMBO S35.Sa 



Jerrold, Zenith, Hamlin, Sci. Alianta, Pioneer 

& MORE! OUR PRICES ARE BELOW WHOLESALE! 

CABLE-)- PLUS 

14417 Chase St. #481-A Panorama City, CA 91402 
1-600-822-9955 • Other Info. 1-818-785-4500 

NO WUF. SALES - OEALEFtS WANTED 



SATELLITE TV 



FREE catalog — Lowest prices worldwide, save 40 
— 60%, Systems, upgrades, parts, all major brands 
factory fresh and warrantied. SKYVISION, INC, 
2O09 Collegeway, Fergus Falls, MN 56537. 1 (BOO) 
334-6455. International (218) 739-5231, 

CABLE TV secrets — the outlaw publication the 
cablecompaniestriedtoban, HBO, Movie Channel, 
Showtime, descramblers, converters, etc. Sup- 
pliers list included. $9,95. CABLE FACTS, Box 711- 
R, Pataskaia. OH 43062. _^ 

FREE catalog 32 pages. Satellite systems, ac- 
cessories ana upgrades lowest prices all major 
brands no-one undersells WEST INC, since 1977 1 
(800) £22-9064. 



K.D. VIDEO 

FOR ALL YOUR CABLE TV NEEDS 
WE SPECIALIZE IN DEALER PRICING 



QTY 1 10 20 

Jerrold (Type) SB-3 89.00 56.00 48.00 

Jerrold (Type) Tri-8t 119 00 69.00 65.00 

Scientific Alianta SA-3 1 29.00 80.00 75.D0 

Hamlin MLD-1200 99,00 59.00 45.00 

OakN-l2Vari-Sync 99.00 59.00 58.00 

Jerrold 550 Converter 99,00 75.00 68.00 
Jerrold 400 DRX-3DIC 
[With Built in SB-3) 169.00 109.00 100.00 



1-800-327-3407 

Call us tor prices on large quantities 
K □. Wdeo PO Box 29538, Mpls,, MN 55429 



ITHl VAC t CCH TfllKlTED A9 A njnJC S| 



When someone 

in your family 

gets cancer, 

everyone 

in your family 
needs help. 



NolxKly knows better ihin 
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pr(.]gmtu crniplusizc ihc whale 
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Ainong^Hir regulir servtccs 
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irjnj^|y>ri paclcnu lo nnd from 
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indiuist paiJen[£JJi [heJrreium 
loe^tfyiiiyJifc 

Life Is wh3[ concerns us. 

So you can sec wc are even 
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No one ^e^ once F atone, 



^ AMBtKMN OlMCSl K>QE1Y 



Adefense 

j^ainst cancer 

can be coofced up 

in your kitchen. 



There is evidence that 
diet and cancer arc related- 
FoUow these iVKKUflcaiions in 
yoiiT daily diet to rc<iuce 
Chinees of Reitinji cancer: 

1 . Eat mofc higli-fiber ToocLs 
such 25 fnjjts and veReiables 
itid wholc'grain cereals. 

2, Include dark ^een and 
deep yellow fruits and vegeta- 
bles rich in vitamins A and C- 
3'* Include cabba^, broccoli. 
biiLsscIs sprouLv, kohlrabi and 
cauliflower. 

4* Be mcHdfratc in consump- 
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nitriie-ai red foods, 
5- Cut down on total faiin- 
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6, Avoid obesity 

7, Be moderate in consump- 
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No one face? cancer alctfic. 



AACM 
€L€CTRONICS 



.EMS • MfCnOVL 
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Place just one order from our new 192-page catalog of over 
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and components. Choose from an extensive selection of high- 
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options and superior customer 
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your #1 choice and start enjoying 
the best of a|l worlds today! 

Get Your FREE, ONE-YEAR 
SUBSCRIPTION to the MCM 
Electronics Catalogs, Call 
TOLL-FREE, 1-800-543-4330. 



MOM uonoNict 

SPRtNG CATAU30 
19 9 




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MCM ELECTRONICS 

650 CONGRESS PARK DR. 
CENTERVILLE, DH 45459-4073 
A PREMIER Company 

SOURCE NO. RE-65 



CIRCLE 87 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



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CATV CONVERTERS 
AT LOWEST PRICES 

Panasonic, Jerrold, Tocom, 

Pioneer, Scientific Atlanta, 

Zenith, Oak, Hamlin, Eagle, 

and all other brands 

Microwave Antennas 

(wireless cable) with 

matching descramblers 

Call Mon-Fri 10AM- 5:30PMj 
Eastern time or write tor 

FREE CATALOG 




NO CONNECTICUT SALES, it if nol Owmlsntvl IbinH^al VUm to ihrrud iny tlf 
Eelrnvn opif^ uhI nv wiH not aunt iny compi;^ or vidtviduiJ m fi^m ^ 
WjUVCR i, thi iptfrt^ntd. wn i {onunutfi tdull «f il iHtt Zi ywn ct tftt. J>4 luty 
undiftiaid Alt mmnAJfi d > abK diudtf don nU vvc Mr cmhc bI Um Acodir tAt 

nflht Es 0i«M w wit* p(t(n*«i n*n etojvmi wMwrt BtWd luthaiaBi" "■ — ■"" 
^„. „,^ — ..^. _^ ^.^■^_ ^._^__ ..^^_ ...^. ^ pjj^jy yijf 



bcn am anmt- *id tiMbr d*(th 

(inAiud. ti iTf IdM. iril «i^ H tori 



Mniitir » ptnuiy tttiF ^ pf4duCt( 



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520 GLEMBROOK ROAD. SUITE MO 202 

STAMFORD. CT 06905 

Ddersonv 1" 00-622-9022 

Maitjg&inio {2 3) 975-7543 



CIRCLE 64 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



LEARN TV/VCR 
REPAIR 

Now ynii can train at hcime in spare time for a money-making 
career as a TV VCR Repair SpEcialisL No previous expEii- 
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is explaine<l in eesy-to-undofstand Janguage wilh plenty of draw- 
ings, diagrams and photos We sfiow you how to trouble slioot 
antf repair video-oassette recorders and TV sets, how to handle 
house calls and shop repairs for almosl any make ol televisioi^ or 
VCR, Tools are included with your course so ydu can ^et 
"tiands-on" practice as you follow your lessons slep by step. 
Send for free fads about the exciting opportunities In TV.'VCR 
Repair and find oui how you can s^arl rnaking money in Ihis 
great caie e^ MAI^COUPO_N TODAY_ _ _^s_ 

^[I taB l SCHOOL OF TVAfCR RCPAIR. DepI, DE090 

'JciSwl 925 Cak Street. Scranton, PA 1 851 5 

Please send me lull mformalion and color brochure on how I can 

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there is no obligation and no salesrrtan will visit me. 

Hame *(a 



Mitet% 

Cltyrstate_ 
i Phone ( 



-A(il#_ 



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EDUCATION & INSTRUCTION 

MAGICI Four illustrated lessons plus inside infor- 
mation shows you how. We provide almosl 50 tricks 
inctuding equipment for four pnjfessional effects. 
You get a binder to keep the materials in, and a one- 
year membership in the International Performing 
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your name goid-embossed. You get a one-year sub- 
scription to our quarterly newsletter "IT's MAGICI" 
Order now! $29,95 for each course -r $3.50 postage 
and handling. (New York residents add applicable 
state and local sales tax). THE MAGIC COURSE, 
500-B BiCounty Boulevard, Farmingdaie, NY 
11735, 

VIDEO tape VMS basic cleaning and maintenance. 
TV one and a half tiours, VCR one hour. $38.00 
each. JAMES BRADFORD, PC Box3B359, Detrtiit. 
Ml 4B238. 



ELECTRONIC review Detailed electronics review- 
ing for bettering grades, interviews, and promotions. 
Over 300 pages $39.95 include $4.25 shipping. 
USER-GRAPHICS, Education Department, 7136 
Everett, Boise, ID 33704-7415. 

LEARN IBM PC assembly language. 60 pro- 
grams. Disk $5.00. Book $18.00. ZIPFAST, Box 
12238. Lexington. KY 40581 -2238. ^_^ 

TURN your love into a livingl The professional video 
indcistry needs qualified technicians, tnstitute of Au- 
dio Research, the world leader in audio education, 
announces the Video Tectinology Program for 
people like you. In under a year turn your flair for 
eieotronics into higtily marketable skills. Grads work 
in broadcast television, production companies, 
rnanufactuters. corporate communications, etc, Fi- 
nancial aid available ifqualified.HSdtplomaorGED 
required. INSTITUTE OF AUDIO RESEARCH, 64 
University Place, New York, NY 1OO03. (800) 
544-2501. NY, NJ, CT (212) 777-8550. 



ANTigUE RADIO CLASSIFIED 

Free Sample! 

Antique Radio's r^^s; 

Largest Circulation Monthly, [ ^^ 
Articles, Ads S Classifieds. 
6-Mor»th Trial: $13. 1-Yr: $24 ($36-l9t Class). 
A,n.C„ P.O. Box 802-L6, Carlisle, MA 01741 




WANTED 



INVENTIONS/new products/Ideas wanted: Call 
TLCl for free information. 1 (800) 468-7200 24 
hours/day - USA/Canada, 

TRAVEL! High income! Radio officers wanted for 
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DIO ASSOCIATION, 5700 Hammonds Ferry, 
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EMINENCE .tI^" MMOTOflOU Pdydax 

1-800-338-0531 ^ pioMEen 



3-WflY lOOW CROSSOVER 



12 dB/«lave roUsn. 
800Hz, SOOOHi 
croBsover poinls. B 
olun. IIXI wans rms. 

$12.50 



t^ 



#260-210 



(1-9) 



$9.95 

dO-up] 



SPEAKER CONTROL 
PANEL 

Puiel wiih SO wui L-pids 
[or tweeter and inidrangc 
and buili-in LED power 
raelet. 5'i 2 1«- IIW 
watt varaieii arailalila 

$14^ 
#260-235 (1-5) 




$12.90 

CS-up) 



12 POLY WOOFER 



Super duty. 40 oz, magnoL 
100 waits RMS. 14S watta 
niax 4 and 8 chzn compai- 
ibk (6 oliRi). r vdct coiL 

[•-2SHi.0TS=.iee, 

VAS=10.8cuft. 
Swponse- 25-lKC Hs. Nei 
weighr d lbs. Pioneer 
ifASOCiUtO-SID 



#290-125 



$36.80 

Cl-3) 







$34.50 

(4-up) 



15" WOOFER 



Original Sanyo 
woofer. Pap6r 
cone with vantad 
dust cap and 
Ire aled doth 
surround. 12 oz. 
magnet. €0 watts 
RMS.eSwatB 
ntax. Bohm. 
Rasonanc«: 26 Ri. 
Response: 25- 
2,500 Hi. 



#291-155 $23" 
(1-5) 




$21^° 

(e-up) 



PIONEER HORN 



TWEETER 

MvllJ 4otne. a, S3 01. 
barium teniio magitel. i 
(jhm. ResponBB; 1800- 
aOODC Mz. aSW RMS, 
WW man. £t = !<XXJHl, 
5PL ^ 1(K dB, Picmeer 
#AHE60.S1F 



^ 



#270-050 



mf 



$5.90 

(lO-up) 



Vf pans 

'express 



340 E. fim Sl, DayttH^ Oko 4&UE 
TAX 913-222 4«M 



MuHrard, Vi^ DhCotk. vnd COD. cditai *3l hour ihi^TUi? 
■Shippuq i^hargD- UPS ctun lale -'tl.OO (.S3-DJ rmnimum chu^i) 
'Houn: a-JO im- 6:00 pm ^T. Mondiy - Fiidty *Uul oidar 
i?4Kiin«i*, p^HH- cal] fcr dipping huthi* «n ordtrs 4xc»duig 

5tb». 



12" SUB WOOFER 



Duai voice coil sub woofet. 
30 oz. ma^et, ^ voice 
coils. 100 wjlltl RMS, 149 
watts trtaz. ib = 2& He. 6 ohm 
(4 and 8 olun compatible). 
SI>L = 89dS IW/IR 
Respoi^e: 2S-;00 Hi. 
C>TS=.3!. VAS-10.3cu.(L. 
Pioneer #A3(1GU30-5SD. 
Kel weight: G lbs. 

#290-145 




S39.8D 
0-3 



-3) 



$36.80 

(4-iip) 



15" THRUSTER WOOFER 

Thmxter by Enuiteitce. 
Made in USA. Poly ftsun 
EUROtind. W 01. magnel. 
2-]JT, 2 layer voice coil. 
ISO watts RMS, 210 watts 
max, 4 ohm, fs = 23,5 
Hi, OTS=,33. VJIS^17.9 
cutt. SPL = M.8dB IW/ 
IM. Met weight IS lbs. 

$43.50 
#290-180 *i_3^ 




18 EMINENCE WOOFER 



MXDEmtKA 

100 oz. tnagnet, 3' voice 
ccjdL 250 watts RMS, 3S0 
watts max. 8 ohm, 30 Hi 
resonar^t frequency. 22- 
2700 Hz response. 
Efficiency: 93 dE IW/IM. 
Paper cone, treated 
accordian buhyjutkL Net 
weight: 29 lbs. 




#290-200 



$9S.90 

Cl-3) 



$89.50 

(4-up) 



TITANIUM COAOKSSITE 
TWEETER 



TeIutj^ 13 dofxsi'bd an t polyinK 
dcznB to combn* ttu kdwtKgga of 

bcda hjjil 4nd tcft d«T» 
wdmdoawt- Sohm. T'DicAuicI 
Coolsd ycooB coil ii ><■ 1900 Hi; 
SPL-Hl dfi IWyiML » w«tti ItMS, 
70 wiRt mu, i' Tound. Peti^du 
ptn *UTVf\<ffT\2S, 

$27.50 
#270-047 (1-9) 



(& 



$24.80 

ClO-up) 



GRILL FRAME KIT 

Wiih this kit y^u 
cui jTLftke spe«ksr 
grilt frames up to 

includes 4 ccmsT 

briclceis, uid 7 
frame bars. Grill 

mounting kil 
included^ 

#Z60-333 



CIRCLE 56 ON FFIEE INFOaMATION CARD 



INVENTORS! Confused? Need help? CalJ rMPAC 
for ftee information package. In US and Canada: 1 
(800) 225-5800. 

WANTED: Australian Kit Supplier is seeking bulk 
suppliers of any interesting new and disposal elec- 
tronic components and assemblies: Eg: image con- 
vener tubes (RCA 6032, RCA 6923. XX1080 etc.). 
laser tubes/diodes/accessories, lens assemblies, 
small C.R.O. tubes, etc. etc., OATLEY ELEC- 
TRONICS, PO Box 89, Oatley, N.S.W. 2223, Syd- 
ney, Australia Ph: (02) 5734985 Fax: (02) 5707910. 



mUTSt VOLTS, 



P.O. Boh 1111-E 



GIVE VDUflSELF A BRLAK - A PfllCE BHEAKF 

mura £ uolts mill S**^ yqu MGNEy 

GN ELECTRONIC PARTS B EQUIPMEMT 
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UNUSUAL ANO HAnO.TQ^FINa ITEMS. 



^ AHilktitPtilialiMFKTiiBt^iAirJStlliiifOfBKtmiiel^s^ii^ 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 

EASY worki Excellent pay! Assemble products at 
home. Call for information. (504) 641-8003 Exl. 
5192. 

MAKE SSO/hr working evenings or weekends in 
your own electronics business. Send for free facts. 
INDUSTRY, Box 531, Bronx. NY 10461. 



TUBES - 2000 TYPES 
DISCOUNT PRICES! 

Early, hard-to-find, and modem tubes. 
Also transformers, capacitors and 
parts for tutae equipment. Send $2.00 
for 2 4 page whoiesats catalog. 

ANTIQUE ELECTRONIC SUPPLY 

688 W. Firsi SI.'Tempe, AZ 85281 •602; S94-9503 




CABLE T.V. CONVERTERS 

WHYPAYA HIGH MONTHLY FEE? 




All Jerrold. Oak. Hannlin, Zenith, Scientific 
Atlanta, Magnavox and all specialized cable 
equipment available for shipment within 24 
hours. For fast service MG / VISA or C.O. D. 
telephone orders accepted (BOO) 648-3030 
60 Day Guarantee (Quantity Discounts) 
8 A.M. to 5 P.M. C.S.T. CLOSED WEEK- 
ENDS. Send self-addressed Stamped enve- 
lope (60C postage) tor Catalog. 




LEARN to clean/repair fax machines. Huge new 
market! Earn J35/hour No experience necessary. 
Free details call 1 (800) 537-0589 Or write to: VIEJO 
PUBLICATIONS, 3540 Wilshite Blvd. #310, Dept. 
FX200, LA, CA 90010. 

MAKE $75,000 to S250,000 yearly or more fixing 
IBM color monitors (and most brands). No invest- 
ment. Start doing it from your home. (A telephone 
required.) Information, USA. Canada $1.00 cash. 
US lunds. other countries $8.00 RANDALL DIS- 
PLAY, Sox 2168-R, Van Nuys, CA 91404 USA, 

INVENTORS: We submit ideas to industry Find out 
what we can do for you. Call 1 (800) 288-tDEA. 




SR*1- 
u, Li:?- 

EicRUS4- 
MpBTta — 
EKMCP1- 
S^LLSI- 
60EH1- 
3S EHL1 - 

3JU- 
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SEEINTREOAflX S10.M 

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PFS1K-HANOCONTflOLLEDPLASMAHRESABEB iAiSO 
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t/i DNE10 - AIL NEW 26" VIVID COLORED NEON STICK . S74S1 
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EASY ORDERING PROCEDURE ■ TOLL FREE l-9tl0-221'1?lK 

or 24 HRS ON 1-S03.6T3-4730 or FAK IT TO 1-603-672-S406 

VISA. MC, OtECK. MO IN US FUNDS. INCLUDE lOftSHIPPING ORDERS 

S1M.00 4 UP ON LY ADO S10 00. CATALOG Sr .00 OR FREE WITH ORDER. 



INFORMATION UNLIMITED 

P.O. BOX 716, OEFT. Kl. AMHERST. NH 03031 



MARK V ELECTRONICS, INC. 

Competitive Pricing * Fast Shipping 



ORDER IN CALIFORNIA 800-521-MARK 
ORDER OUTSIDE CA 800-423-3483 
FREE CATALOG & INFORMATION (213)888-8988 
FAX (213) 888-6868 






i nd icales Ihe level of difficulty in the assembling of our P roducts 



'vAt Amplifier 
5 Uelal Cabinet 



Transfofmpf 



Kit Set 
Astmb. Set 



TA-3600 



#007 



$138 60 
$160.20 



TA.477 



LG-iai25 



«003 



$115.20 
1130.50 



TA.802 



LG-1924 



$ 91.75 

; 104,1 5, 



TA-1000A 



LG-1924 



$104.12 
SI 22 92 



▲ Beginner AA Intermediate AAA Advanced -* 

SM-32S 



Du4 to Ihis siMCial offer & low pnce. we can aflly excfiangs ar reparr arvy of IFlBsa ur\its 

(TA.3S0O. TA .477. TA.&0^aTA"10MA)wHtlinl5 days olyouMeccipl 

Tlie ibowe pfKes aie for the oompreie seis For separate unit rmce. please sea l^fow. 








SM-333 
T A. 2500 

TA-2400A 



Fully Assembled 
$139.00 $p«a5 



70.00 

ea.so 

96.00 



Transformer 



TA-S02 



Metal Cabinet 



TA-477 



AMPLIFIERS 



KIT ASSMB. 



fvlOOEL 

TA-2SUK2 

TA-50fc'S 

TASOC 

TA.120f«IK2 

TA.300 

TA.3D! 

TA323A 

TA-377A 

TA.iOO 

TA-477 

TA.KIO 

TA-802 

TA-e20A 

TA-1000A 

TA-1600 

TA-2S(J0 

TA-2400A 

TA-2S0O 

TA-ZaOO 

TA-3000 

TA.360O 



DESCRIPTION 

Digital Voice Wemtj aa „ 

Multi-Purpose f\^fllody Generator A. ™ 

Mtilti -Purpose Melody Generator A — ........ 

35W Class "A" Marn Power Mono Amp AA. 
30W Multi-Putpose Single Cfiannel Amp A-, 
60W Sierea Power Booster (w/oase) AA. ... 

30WX2 Slereo Pie-main Amp A „. 

Hi-Oualily FET Slereo Pie-Amp i 




m^ 



TA-1000A 



TA-3e00 



% 

$P«aE 



^9 



..$ 30.00 

11. 64 

„ 12 65 

.. 27.16 
,. 20.00 



29.50 

.„ 59.95 

40W Solid Slate Mono Amp A 28.00 

1!0W Mostet Powei Mono Amp A A 68.00 

80W«eOW DC Pie-Ma.n S Power Amp A A _ 60.92 

80W.B0W DC Stereo Mam Power Amp A* 45 94 

60W+60W OCL DC Pie-Main Slereo Amp AA 40.39 

1 0OW Dynamic Class "A"Maan Power Morw Amp AA. 59.69 

100W112 Class "A" DC stereo Pre'Main Amp AAA 73.70 

FET Supei class -A- DC Pre-Amp AAA 47.70 

Electronic Echo & Reverberation Amp AAA* 

HQ Pre-Amp w/10 band graphic equalizer * 

HI-FET IC Pre-Amp. w..'3 way lone control AA 4B,90 

S1ereoSiiriuiatof(n>onoTV''anymonosource)AA 2700 

30OW HQ Hi.pi Power Mono Amp AAA 79 OO 

"~~~ RyWElft SI3PIHL1ES 



TuT" 



TR-IODA 
TR-355A 
TR-35SB 

TR-503 



S 16.58 
17.71 
3681 
29.00 
70 00 
36.35 
75.00 
34.93 
6S.0O 
79.20 
59.72 
49.37 
80.58 
9S.81 
5824 
9S.aD 
68 80 
63.57 
3a. 50 
103.00 

ASSWlB, 



MTSCELLaNKSIS" 



Kit xfiSMW. 



MODEL DESCRIPTION 

TY-23H 3 Ctrannet Color Lighl Contioller AAA* $ 61.20 $ 65.00 

TY-25 Slereo Loudspeaker Pioteolor A 12'.6S 18,68 

TY'36 FM Wireless Miciophone 9.22 

TY-36 AC'DC Quartz Digital Clock A 18.00 25.20 

TY.38 Sound.Touch Control Swilcti A ....,....,„...„...„..„...... 12.00 

TY-11MKV Wared Remote Conliol LtnN w/iase AAA 20.00 35.00 

TY.42 Bsr/Dol Level Meter A A ,..,„..,„..„,.., „ 24.15 

TV-43 31/4 Digilal Panel WIeler A _ 29.00 36.00 

TY-45 20 Steps Ban'Dot Audio Level Display AA. „._ 38.45 46.14 

TV-47 Supenor Electronic Roulette AA 19.46 27.24 

SM-222 7 Band HI-FI Sraphic Equalizer AAA , 26.B0 36.80 

StA-llS 4 Channel Pfolessionai Color Lighl Controller*. 139.00 

SM-333 AudioA/rdsoSunound Sound Processor AAA* 62.G0 70.00 

SM-66B Dynamic Noise Reduclion A. 26.0C 34.00 



O- 15V2A Regulated DC Pov»er Supply (w/case) AAA t $ 69.50 

0-15V 5ARegulaied DC Power Supply A 14.55 2076 

0-30V 3A Hegulalod DC Power Suf^ly A 14.55 20.76 

O-50V 3A Regulated DC Power Sumly AA 15.76 22.66 



mctal cabinets with aluminum panel 


MODEL 
LG-1273 


H- I 
3- 
4- 
4' 

s- 

21.- 


12' 
16' 
19' 
19- 

19" 


D- 
7- 
8- 

11'* 
1 1 i.V 
8- 


MATCH If^CS PRICE 

TA-280OTA.377A. TA-2200 S 22.16 

TA-323A TA-377A TA-2200 26.64 


LG-1924 
LG-1925 
LG-1983 


TA-BOg. TA-02OA. TA-ISOO. TA-130MK 2, rA-000, TA-ITOOA 32.00 

TA-477. TA-800. TA-15O0. TA-1000A, TA-3600 35.00 

TA.377A TA 2800 TA-220Q TA.120MK2 28 50 






POWER TRANSFORMERS 



ASSMB. ifooi 

S 43.00 «002 



SM.43 S'.-i Mulli-Functional Led D.P.M. (vrMBS plastic case) AA ...S 34.50 . . .. 

SM-4S 41-- Hi-Precision D.P.M.AAA 38.00 48.00 »003 

SM-4BA 414Hi-PiesoisionD.P,M.(w«BSplas1i<! ease) AAA 41.20 52.00 *004 

SM-49 3<.'i Mutti-Funciional LCD D.P.M. (w/hold lunctlon) AA 3B.00 44.50 #005 

SM-100 160 MC Digilal Frequency Counler AAA 79.00 90.00 *O06 

FC-IOOOA 1 GHz Frequencv Counter * 179.00 #007 



DESCRIPTION 
56VCT. 60VCT6A 
72VCT 3A 
B0VCT6A 
48VCT 5A 
52VCT3A 
36VCT 5A 
112VCT8A 



MATCHING PRICE 

TA-SOO.TA-a02,TA-820A,TA-1000A, TA-150O $ 26.00 

TR.5a3. TA-323A, TA.400, TA-SOO 21.00 

TA-477 27,00 

TA.120 MK2 „ „ 21.00 

TR-355B 15.00 

TR-355A 14.50 

TA-3600 42.00 



- , ...... BliSirteSS 6 SlKlrtrco-; ■ ■:;;,! ''i...i.. i-'^- 

1. .; ■ >■■ . ... ,• ■■..:,-■. -...-. ... n . ■...»; . ,' - :. , . ■,,.._=. ■ ■ „. , ■. ,M, ^ >■.,, •,-:.>_,, ■, ,■ v.j -■■•..; ...iv ! i..i «... j... ■• ^ ■ .■ -Ik ,;. ■ Mon lliru Fll 030 ,1IT1 10 5 OO pm 

MARK V ELECTRONICS, INC. - 8019 K. Slauson Ave, Montebello, CA 90640 ^HSfi 



CIRCLE 93 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



m 

-H 

m 

w 
m 

33 

tc 
to 
o 



97 



THE ELECTRONIC GOLDMINE 



,TED BLACK LtGHT KTT 

1^ U!K ijrtp umiftmi u Sh^ed e^ Lqri Tu(x 







UMQUt 



■k Comes 1*1 PC Ba* Parts, lutt and vonKions ' ' 

* OtB^ InmkvSi B^biY Sum: (nol M) -* Sin m Bcont: r x 1^' 

seas§ S13J5 



MINI OEICER COUNTER KIT 



Mas Au TiKs m naraw 
LJsQ SefGNtvE Al(:f» Wnckm Tucx 
OpEfates r^Tifn Sn' ^tlerv {wt In:!'} 
Cwiies wlh PC Scan. Pv,i, 
Tute and IrtsETLftons 
SHrtPCBMnt Tiiy 



C6430 $59.95 




CS44a $19ja 



IMP Krr 

Bwfl Car stows, Ta(K 
PB^enL PffWw^ Rases, *. 

Fiduis 2 Eltail 2IW RMS 
AniE •* IMS ColmB 

Opecte en SarK3ant 12V 
CarBaiiffy 

CO(fE w^ PC ftuid. Fans arv! 
hssusaicns-yaj ^fff sr^wr 
Tia M PC Bnafit F I !S' 



INFRUIEO DEreCTOn KIT 

* Omcs AU Tyco t( Wmo 

(n/VCR Ftnillis, L£K) 
A- Produces SoiAJ fid 
eii^ Rn UD Ou«u 

* C^dB (m w BaKir (nm IncL) 

* Comei rt«i PC Banl Para 



* SjeolPCBoan): ini.c 




Ce441 S5.95 



INFRARED UQDULE 

Snail Mrarad recBrvr maJulE Is siWItiw Id ilmosr al 
irliTEd rcinlB CQNioifei^ arvd 1^4? EiJoh {ioji H^ BfiV ^ 
rociLC ^ns Opwies ami SrtJC artS 5 w^ seisiw (< wi! 
1,^ jn L£D or Oras a ^ wjaoe rE^ liQn to h; SOFt aA?y) 
WsUt art ^kuD de^ran aii^ ^oj [jwde o-icm [W;k 
C514 »1.a9 cJLHmrtBY.SaslPCtemi i-»ri.i- 




^ 



INFBAHEO LED 
JjfTtK dear (ase. 



mEnTEii TnusraRUED 

SnJ * W i™i3*[iir?r 6 bB used «^ 
SB C cm* llira™t IJTOC » ;SW« 

NITCtJ J2.K] E*CH tOO^TtUHJ 



r.llHIHUH ORDER: SIOOD plus HOC sNppmg jna tu 

Wu JKepI r.lC. VrM sna Money Outers 

EENQ ORDERS TO: I no Elearonic Goknww 

PO Hw 5J(i3 SmiiSdlaH, « SHSI 

PHONE ORDERS: re)!l 45I.7-1W 



CIRCLE 176 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



***** PRESEftmiSiG *■♦(** * 

CABLE TV 




T 



«^-»r*^ STAiWflNG ***** 

JSimOLD, HAJHUHI, OAK 

AND OTHER FAMOUS MANUFACTURERS 

• RNCST UAWffWiNTV WDCAAM AW^JL^ftLE 

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• OflDCK SHIP^D FflOM ITOCK WTTMIN ^^ HOUffi 

FOR FREE CATAUXi ONLY 1-S00-14 5'^n 2 7 



— , PACIFIC CABLE CO., INC. 

■J 7325V1 Heaeda Blvd., Depi, 1000 
^^ Reseda, CA 91335 



PROJECTION TV... Make $$$'s assembling proj- 
ectors. Easy!,,, Results comparable to $2,500 proj- 
ectors... Plans, 8" lens & dealers information 
$25.50.,. Professional systems available.,. Illus- 
trated catalog tree. MACROCOMA, 15GAX Main 
Stieet, Washington Crossing, PA 18977,,, Credit- 
eard orders 24Hrs. (215) 736-2690, 

RECOVER pure gold from scrap circuit boards, 
electronic parts. Easy methods. Send $5.00, RECY- 
CLING, Box 11216PE. Reno, NVS5510-1216. 

WHY rent? Homester $1.00, repOsGov'tgive away 
programs! For information (504) 649-0670 Ext. 
FI-5192. 

LET the government finance your small business. 
Grants/loansto $500,000 Free recorded message: 
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EASY! Moneymaking one man CRT rebuilding 
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YOUR own radio slatiorv! AM, FM, TV, cable, Li- 
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BEST BY NAIL 

Ratfts: Wrjte National, Bojc 5, Sarasota, FL 34230 



BOOKS ■ CATALOGS- MAGAZINES 

FBEEtATALOG-DESlGNEn l^lcming. OMEGA, lOI(RE) 
Clematis. Pensaeola, FL 32503-3634^ 

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 
300 PHONE NUMBERS-$5,0C0-I- possible weekly, liltle 
money needed, I' If teach you. Send S9.95 -i- $1.00 SJH. 
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H^ONEVMAKING OPPORTUNITIES 

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SiW- PPS, 11504 Hughes, Houston, TX 77039. 

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OF INTEREST TO ALL 

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Advice, 1-900-FUN-1390, S.95 mi nute. 

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Rare Books-(RE), 11246 Soutfi Postoak, Suite 306, 

Houslon, T X 77035. 

ROBOTS! FULLY ASSEMBLED and kits, tobol arms, PC 
interlaces, motor sensors, S30,O0 to $80,000,00, Catalog 
S5.00 I'elundatile with ordei. HTO, P.O. Bos 3034, flSF, 
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INVENTORS 



INVENTORS! Can yi^ij patent and profit from your 
idea? Call AMERICAN INVENTORS CORPORA- 
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1 (800) 338-5656. In Massachusetts of Canada call 
(413) 568-3753. 



C0f»/1PUTER KITE 



CfHnI THkabn CaaHLir lUti Isdudc i nnV^fii Jinc ^^ 

[iflOM.BA,nl3WiiriKkh. llCTiftdnTpKdtqDeTtF Jl^ 

thil^piMAtfW'ef^MarMJi ' i faiHi i*'^l»W<»>l»r. ' 

TWftibe nn, my ic build, «4a«iSotul, tn\tj !iA[ ttuwi' 



TWrr. 



vtwkali pficci. All kill m 
free ilq] IfilEih BicirMf inimHJL 
hiOwirt, Crnr ji wH fintnt/ iral our 2i kvr v^p^SlOtitt I 
pl^fw^inf AM«w6iji!t»viiLjMr, 



I Did iiKndc I ! 




S_i, 



ask for your free catati^ 



General Technics 

OviKir camputH Srtumt 



gntpmi. tm tT7( 



( si« ) sat . Mrs 



COLLIMATOR PEN 

(INFRA-RED) 




LASER DIODE 
(INFRA-RED) 




LASER DIODE 
(VISIBLE-RED) 




LASER DIODE 

(VISIBLE-RED) 




UNicom - row ix. source i 



■ Output: 2.5 mW (max.) 
•Current: 90-150 mA 

• Operating Voltage: 2.2-2.5V 
•W/avelength: 820nm 

• Collimation: .ISmrad (typ.) 

• Size: 1 1 mm diameter 



STOCK# 

SB1052 



PRICE 

$39.99 



•Output: 1 mW (max.) 
•Current: 90-150 mA 

■ Operating Voltage; 2. 2-2. 5 V 

■ Wavelength: 820 nm 

STOCK# PRICE 

SB1053 $9.99 



• Output: 5 mV/ (max.) 
•Current: 65-100 mA 
•Operating Voltage: 1,75-2.2V 
•Wavelength: 780nm 

STOCK# PRICE 

LS022 $19.99 



■ Output: 5 mV^ (max.) 

• Current: 20 mA 

• Operating Voltage: 2.2-3.0V 

• V^avelength: 665nm 



STOCK# 

LS3200 



PRICE 

$129,99 







EPROMS 










1702 


24 


256 « 4 lus 


3.99 


3.79 


3,4t 


2708 


24 


1024x8 iSOns 


6.49 


6.17 


5.55 


2758 


24 


102419 450ns 


3.99 


3,79 


3,41 


27tf 


24 


204B!i8 4S0ils(2Sv) 


3.29 


3.13 


2,82 


2716-1 


24 


2048 « 8 350ns psv) 


3,79 


3,60 


3,24 


THS2716 


24 


204518 4S0ns 


6.29 


598 


6,38 


27C16 


24 


2048x8 450nj (25u.Cli«OS) 


3,99 


3,79 


3,41 


2732 


24 


4096 < 8 450(15 125»1 


3.79 


3.60 


3 24 


2732A-2 


24 


4095x8 200ns (21V) 


3,79 


3.60 


3.24 


2732A 


24 


4086x8 250ns (2 1v) 


3.69 


3,51 


3.16 


2732A-4 


24 


4096x8 450ns (21V) 


3.19 


3.D3 


2.73 


TMS2532 


24 


4096x8 450ns (25v) 


5 79 


5,50 


4,95 


TMS2532P 


24 


4096 X 8 450n5 (25v-Ona Time ProaiainmahiB) 


193 


1.89 


1.70 


27C32 


24 


4096x8 450ns (25V-CMOS) 


419 


3.98 


3.58 


2764-20 


2S 


6192x8 20Ons(21v) 


3.99 


3.79 


3.41 


27W 


28 


8192x8 250ns (21v) 


3.79 


3.60 


3.24 


27e4A.20 


20 


8192x8 2a0ns(12 5v) 


3.99 


3.79 


3.4t 


2764A 


28 


8192x8 250ns (125v) 


3.29 


3.13 


2 82 


TMS2S64 


28 


8192x8 260ns (2Sv) 


6.79 


6,45 


5,81 


27C«4 


28 


8192 !i 8 250ns (21v-CI^0S( 


4.19 


3.98 


3.58 


2712B-2a 


28 


16,384x8 20Ons(21v) 


5.79 


5,50 


4,95 


27126 


28 


16,384x8 250ns (2 IV) 


5.09 


4 84 


435 


271 28A 


28 


16.384x8 260ns (2 W) 


5,79 


5,50 


4,95 


27C128 


26 


16,384x8 250ns (21v) 


5.79 


6.50 


4.96 


27256-20 


26 


32,728 >! 8 200ns (12,5v) 


5,29 


5,03 


4.53 


2T25« 


26 


32.768 I 8 250ns {1 2 5v) 


4.79 


4 56 


4.09 


27C2S6 


28 


32,768 X 8250ns (1 2, Sv-CMOS) 


5.29 


S.D3 


4.53 


27512-20 


28 


65.636 X 8 200ns (12.5v) 


7.48 


7.12 


6 41 


27512 


26 


65,536 X 8 250ns (1 2, 5v) 


6,99 


6.64 


5.98 


27C512 


28 


65.636 X 8 250ns (12.5v.CMOS) 


6.99 


6.64 


5.98 


27C1024 


32 


131,072x8200nsl12.5v-CMOS) 


17.ga 


17.09 


16,38 


6S764 


24 


8162x8 460ns 


13.99 


13 29 


11,95 


eS766 


24 


8192x8 450ns 


14.99 


14.24 


1282 




Of i I [ C T K N IC i 

10010 Caroga Ave . Unit B-e ■ Chatsworth. CA 91311 
OUTSIDE CALIFORNIA: (BOO) 824-3432 (Orders Only) 
IN CALIFORNIA: (818) 341-8833 

ORDER BY FAX; (818) 998-7975 

Minimum Order; $15,00 



98 



CIRCLE 166 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



QUALITY PARTS • DISCOUNT PRICES • FAST SHIPPING 



im^}QmMm(^m^ 



MBZS:BUZZm 



tar# HMB-Oe 

iporataG from 4-6 Vdc. 

TL cofTpatibte^ 

■raws 20 mA Q 6 Vdc. EmitG high pl^chod 

ignal. 0.62 diaiTOtet. 0.55" hiBti. PC pins, 

:at#PBZ>05 $1,50 each 



§ 



, PHOTO .RESISTOF^ 



00 ohrrs light 

8K ohms darts. 
I.iar dia. X .OS-high. 
LinonglaaJs CAT#PHE-7 2tofS100 
lOOIof J45tXl- lOOOIorMOODO 



^ 



I^.CHARACTER ICO jlSPLAV 



^a 



HMchi#LM0l5 

t6 chaj^oei dot matrix LCD display wllh bu[!l-1n 

comrollof/drivfli'. IntflKacaswithAorfibil MRU. 

Displays alphanumerics, kana diaractars and 

symba^r CMOS ' low power dissipation. 

Operates Qn5 Vda Moduta si^e; 3.14" X 1.40". 

Display araa: 2.S3" X 0.S4". 

Character si2e: 0.25' high X 0.1 IS* wide. 

Programmng and hook up irtstrudions induded 

CAT*LCD-1 $9 50oadl 



INSTRUMENT 
ENCLOSURES 




Htgri qualny mokiw) ABS 
irtslnjrrant enclOfLire?'. 
Into^rated PC board 

Standouts and two S4ts 

of vertical mounting 3k>ts for 

Irani and tflarsutj panf»|$u All enclosures ars 

&" wkte X & 1 /4' deep. Choice of thr»e ha^hls. 

Includes non-skid rubber teet and hardware. 

Availabts 4n t>siQ«, ivory, blacK, and blue. 

Pmnti ht CATiV 

2 ^f*'■ CATlf MB-A (7.50 HCll 1 ror $e£.OQ 
2 5ja' CATBMB-B 17 75Mdl 1 lOf W/ 50 
y CATMU^C SQOOMcti lOtorKTO.OO 

Pfoasc specrty cotor 



SOUND ACTIVATED 
SWITCH 




PC board with alactral mika rasponds 

to sounds in I mmed lata vicinity. Oriflinaliy 

part ol sound actWatsd light oigsm. Shuts 

off whan sound is not preeant. Includes 

hook-up diagfani. 

CAT# SAB-2 $2.S0 each 



SWITCHES 



TT PUSH BUTTON 

TT MOPL MflH 3/*'X 

\iSrqt9^ r«tfi(igiiiark*y 
»p. 5.P,S,T, N.O, Puth 
EDctoBv. RAT£Dr0.1 ampswitcMng. 
O.SS amp carry curianL P.C. rmunt. 

CAT«PB-a escsscii ■ lOforse.oo 

1(»forS50.00 

SPOT PUSHBUTTON 

Maquaidtt 1 B43 

Ralacj e smpa @ 1 25^50 Vac 

Blach piaslic puVabuttcn. 
Switch body: ez- X .94' X .65" 
CAT*pa-1S $t esas • 10(or$1S.IX 

PUSHBinrON SWITCH c: 

GC/ThorrKOfi* 35.420 II, 

S-P.S-T. fwrmaltf opan momantary »i 
pushbutlcn awitct). Red ptasTic r] 

actuator 0. 57" diamaisr Chroma 
baiaio.e&'dianwiar Thraaifad bushing 
mountg in .50" diamator hola. Ratad 
3 amp <^ 250Vac. Sotdar k»p larminalft 
CATa PB,so (1.00 asth 

THUMBWHEEL SWITCH 

1 polaiopoaliort 
dacimai ancodad 

awitchas wfMch |* f^ H^^S^i ''Svj 
irhtariock to make 
updasirad number 
or digits. Tannrnatas to 11 pc pins {1 ccm. 
monand tOpolea). Each section maaautaa 
.3f wide X .20" Njti X .78" deap End piatas 
can b« added In fomi a .Q4" high bazal. 
CATiSWTH-3 S1.2Ss«ch 
lOtorStO.OO 
: END PUITES - CAT* SW-9EC S1 (KUSet 




WALL TRANSFORMERS 




ALL PLUG DIRECTLY 

INTO 120 VAC 

OUTLET 

SVaFffleOOma CAT«ACTX-660 S3 SO 
a,avdc®iOma. CATtDCTX-aaioSi 50 
12VdciS>EO0ma CATtDCTX-iaS M.50 
ft Vdc 9 1 amp CATf DCTX-S SI $S .00 
2* Vac (J> E26 ma CATf ACTX-iJfJi S3 CO 



TEtEPHONEJCQUPLING 
.. : TRANSFORMER 



Muhi Products I ntsmatianatf 
A19N-HO-1D/1 
Primary: 600 ohm 
Saconda/y:60(y6QOohm 
0.77" X 0.61" X 0.63" Ngh S p. 
pins on 0.1 S7" canlera. Primary 
Inductance: 300 mH min,. at ihHi. 1 volt. 
CAT* TCTK-I 51 .25 aach • 10 tor $1 1 00 



NICKEL-CAD 

BATTERIES 

^ RECHARGEABLE) 



AAASIZE Sl.SOeach 

1.2volts180mAh 

CATi NCS.AAA 

AASIZE $2.00 each 

1 .25 volts SOO mAh 

CAT#NCB-AA 

AA SIZE ^2.20 each 

WITH SOLDER TABS 

CAT#NCB-SAA 
C SIZE $4.25 each 
1 2 volts 1200 mAh 

CAT* NCB.C 

D SIZE $4 50 aach 

1 2 volts 1200 mAh 

CAT* ucao 



J!ENONTUBe 



I'Eong flashutia with 3 1/2" rad, 
arvl b^ack laada Idaal tor alac- 

trryiic flash or stctoa project* 
CATi FLT a 2 Icj- $'. >] 



RELAYS:.:. 



6 VOLT D.C. - aP.D.T. 
Aroirat > RSD.6V 
Supar amall relay. 
Rated: 1 arrp & 
30 Vdc. TTL diiact drtva poui- 
bla, Oparataa on 4.3 to 14 Vdc. 
Cdl:220ohin8, 1 3/ir X 13^2- 
X7ntr CATdRSO-eV 
$1.50 each •tOlorS13SO 

12 VOLT D.C. 

D.P.D.T. 

DIP RELAY 

Miniatura relay 

fit* ttandard 16 pin (dip) sockets 

oriMlldiraclly mount 10 p.c. 

boards Gl Clara* LM44 000* 

2a0ohm * 30 va switching, 

CAT*CRLY-12 $2 50 aach 

24 VOLT D.C. COIL 

KUP style 

11 pin base 

can t>a sochatad, 

direct sokfarad or quick 

conrted tanninals cen b# u»*d. 

1 3/B" 1 1 1/2" I 2". 3.P.D.T. ■ 
5 amp contacts ■ 470 ohm 
CATi HLY-3S7* S2.25 aach 



0-6 HOUR AUTO 
SHUT-OFF TIMER 



M H Rhodes Inc Marti-Time* 80007 

Timar fits standard 

3" daep walbox. Ratod 

20 itnps @ 125 Vac. Tyrn 

krtob to rtesiiad tima. 

Includes hartfwaro, baiga 

wallplala, artd knob. UL 

and CSA listed. CAT* TMC-S 

S5.?5aach • 10forS50 00 



SPECIAL PURCHASE 

210 MFD 330 V 

PHOTOFLASH CAPACITORS 



Rubicon CE photoJLash capacHor. 
79" da X 11" high These are 
new capacftors that l^ava tjean 
preppad with 1 A' black and red 
wtra leads sou erad to the terminals. 
CAT«PPC-210 $2 50 each 
10lorS22 50 " 1001orS20000 
\_a'r;o qujnlitias available Cjli lor pricing 



STEPPER MOTOR 



AIrpaxP/NC82711-M1 
17 Vdc dual coil. 

parmanent magnet stopper. 

23.25 ohm ctjil. 7.5 degrees perTtep. 
CAT# SMT-8 $6.00 each ■ 1 lor $50,(X) 



SEi^cTRONtc game; board; 




The innef worKengs ol an electronic Scrabble 

game. Operates or fi Vdc. fl dlgh e^ha- 
nunwric readout, 45 button keypad, 14 transis- 
tors, 2 \.0:s, 1 plezo a^ament and olher good- 
las. Top and bottom rew ot keypad buttons 
arw runclion keys, meddle 3 tows are alphabet- 
ic. No inslnjctions available. £~ X 4.45". 
CAT#ST-4 St. 75 each 10 (or SI 5.00 



;i;RG-11/U7E OHM VIDEO CABLE 




100fLor200rt. nib 
o( RG 11/U»nTinBt*d 
IQ htavy duly F connecton. 
Inckides 75 ohm temninator 

and F-G1 spltcoron oneend. 
New cabtts manulndurod fof IBM PC nal- 
works 1 B M P^ 1 50 1 flOa CO NVSCOPE. 
CAT» FW5-1 1-1 100 ft. roll SiS.OO 
CATi F1Q'1 1-2 200 fl roll $27.50 



LED'S 



STANDARD JUMBO 
OiFFus£0 Tl-i^4iK8 



■ RED CAT*LE0-1 
10 tor$1.&0 ■ too For $13.00 

&fiE£N CAT# L£0-2 

10 Iw 42.00 ■ T0QJ[>r$l7 0O 

YELLOW CATlVLED-3 
10 k/t $2.00 ■ too lor SI 7.00 



FLASHING LED 

wilh buitt in flathiig drvuil 
oparat«t on 5 votls... 
ReO SI. 00 audi 

CATJLED-4 tOfirtSSO 



OffEEM St .00 each 

CATf LED-4S 1 fw S9.S0 






LED HOLDER ^ 
Two ptace holder. O A 

CATeHLED ID lor SBC 

RECTANGULAR 
LE.D. SPECIAL 

»HLMP030t [ — 1 

Rod diffused LJ 

roctanglo OSer X 0.1" X 0,2r 

high. Idaal lor bargrapha, chea- 

ers, ate CAT* RLED.4 

to for SI SO ■ 10OIOrS12 0O 

1000 fOf SI 00 00 



LED GRAB BAG 
SOauonad 
LE.D-. 
Many diFferant 

thapei, cole E. HzaK. t^ouod, 

rBctingLji IT, curvad, Bk] 

CATaQRLED 

S4.0d par astoflmant 






OPTO SENSOR 



U shaped package 
wnh mounlirtg ears. 
^f&~ opemng. 
3/4~rtiOLjntingftars. 
CATilOSU^S 50«each 
10t0fS4.5a ■ 1<»lorS4000 

nEFLECnVE OPTO SENSOR 

Optflh* K-8711 

Wedge aJiaped 

devics with IR 

9miner and 

reoaiver panting 

th* uiTwdiriKton. Light mys 

from umittflH' bounce at^ r>ftB.iby 

obj«<[:t and legister on receivur. 

EffKtve ranga appro*. 0.15". 

CAT#0SR^1 75«eBch 



LE.D: FLASHER KIT 



TwoL E.D'sMashin ^|^ 
unison when a 9»rt Z^j^^^^*^^^^^ 
battery is attached. ^LJ:£y^ ^\ 
ThisKN iTKludesa «3>" — 

p.c. board, an the parts 
and InslructJons to niake a simpto fErHshor 
circuit. Aquich and easy project lor any- 
one wtih basic soldenng skills. 
CATi LE DKIT S 1 , 75 pe r kit 



LED CHASER KIT 






Build this variable 

spaed led chaser. 

10 lads flash 

sequentially at 

whatever speed 

you set them for. 

Easy to build kit Indudest pc board, parts 

and instruct ioni. Ideal for special liohllng 

elfects, costumes, etc. Operates on 3 to 

9voHs, PCboardts5'X2 25'. AofMt 

one hour proved, CAT! AEC S6.50 each 




STEPPING MOTOR 

CONTROLLER KIT 



Learn about 

fiteppinfl 

more r« whale 

building thFS 

simple ctrcutL 

Includes circuit board and all pads 

excspt 12 Vdc powor supply. 

CAT#SMKIT Sie.OOeaCh 



RECHARGBABie 
BATTERY PACK (USED) 



Four AA nickel cad- 
mlum batteries COn- 
nsclsd In eaneslo 
mako a4.S volt pack. 
Batteries are In a 
2 X 2 conliguration 
w3tha2pin csonnedor 
attached. The lour 
batteries can be 
separated Into single 
AA size soldef lob 
nickel cadmjufn batteries 
or resoldered into aher configurations. 
SPECIAL SALE PRICE NOW 
$3.00 per pack' ID packs for S2&.D0 
CAT# NCe-«tAAU 



ORDER TOLL FREE 1-800-826-5432 



FAX (818) 781-2653 • INFORMATION (818) 904-0524 
Call Or Write For Our 




Free 60 Page Catalog 

Outslide the U.S.A. send $2.00 
postage for a catalog. 



Minimum Order $10.00 'All Orders Can Be Charged To Visa, Mastercard 

Or Discovercard • California, Add Sales Tax • Shipping And Handling $3.50 

For the 43 Continental United States -All Others Including Alaska, Hawaii, 

P.R. And Canada Must Pay Full Shipping • Quantities Limited • No C.O.D. • 

Prices Subject to change without notice. 



^ 



MAIL ORDERS TO: ALL ELECTRONICS CORP • P.O. BOX 567 - VANNUYS, CA 91408 



CIRCLE 107 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



Mail Order Flecuonics ■ WorlrlwiiJe 



ameco 



ELECTRONICS 



24 Hour Order Hotline (415) 592-8097 

QUALITY PRODUCTS • COMPETITIVE PRICING * PROMPT DELIVERY 



CO 

o 

z 

o 
cc 

\S 

UJ 

_l 

LU 

6 

Q 
< 

CC 



Intel Msth Coprocessors 

a088 or B086 Systems 
8M7 5MHz $89.95 

8087-2 8MHz S1 29.95 

8087-1 10MHz $169.95 

8028E Systems 
80287 6MHz $139.95 

80287-8 BMHz $209.95 

80287-10 10MHz $239.95 

80386 Systems 
80387-16 16MHz $349.95 
80387-20 20MHz $399.95 
80387-25 25MHz $499.95 
80387-33 33MHz $649.95 



SIP Modules 

4125SA9A-aO B(]ns.25«Kx9 $54.3S 

412MASA-10 100ns. 256Kji9 $44.95 

421 W0A9A-7a 70ns. 1IMx9 $159.95 

4210aOA9A-80 BOns.lMiS $124.95 

421OO0A9A-1O lOOns.iMiS S1 16.95 

940001^ S0ns.4Mrt $499.95 

940O0L-10 lOOrts 4Mxg $499.95 

SIMM Modules 

4125«A9B-90 BOns. £56Ki9 S49.95 

4125«A9B>10 100iis.25GKi9 $39.95 

421(XXIAaB-10 IDOns. IMiS $109.95 

421000A9B-70 70ns. 1M«9 $139.95 

42tD(K!A9B-80 sons. 1Mi9 $119.95 

4210DaA9B-10 100ns. 1Mt9 $113.95 

340COS-80 eons. dMi9 $499.95 

3400)3-10 100ns. 4Mi9 $499J5 

HJ'-.MI'i ,'H"4ii ." JW 

NEC V20 & V30 Chips 



PROTOTYPrNG PHODUCTS | 

Jameco Soldertess Breadboards | 



UPD70108-5 
UPD70108-8 
UPD7O10e-10 
UPD7011M 
UPD701 16-10 



SMHi,V20Chip $5.25 

9MHi,V20Cnip $6.95 

lOMHi.VJOChip $1195 

SMHi.vaoChip $7.95 

lOMHi.VSDChip $13.49 



Dynamic RAMs 



TMS4416-12 

TMS4416-1S 

4116-12 

4116-15 

4116-20 

4164-100 

4164-120 

4154-150 

4154-200 

41256-60 

41256-60 

41256-100 

41255-120 

412S6-150 

41454-eO 

41454-10 

41464-12 

41464-15 

511000P-70 

5110COP-80 

511000P-10 

514256P-60 

514256P-10 



IMns, 16Ki4 
150ns. ia<i4 
120ns. 16Ki(1 
ISOns.ieKiI 
!00ns. 16K11I 
100n5.64Kil 
120ns, 64K)(1 
150ns, 64Kxl 
200ns. 64Kil 
60ns, 256tt(l 
sons, 256K»1 
100ns, 256Kll 
lEOns, 256»<ri 
150ns. 256KiI 
80ns, 64»U4 
lOOns, 64Xi<l 
tZOns, 54Ki4 
15fln5.S4Kl4 
70ns, 1 Mr] 
Kms, 1 Mil 
100ns. 1 Mil 
BOns. 256K)(4 
100ns, 256<i4 



$2.25 

$2.00 

$1.49 

$1.09 

S.9S 

$2.75 

$2.39 

$215 

$1.75 

$5,25 

$3,75 

$3,15 

$235 

$2.59 

$5.95 

$4.95 

$3.95 

$3.59 

$13.95 

$12,95 

$12.35 

$13.45 

$12.95 



Static RAMs 



611SP-3 
5264LP-10 
6JS4LF-15 
43256-1 OL 
43256-1 5L 



150ns. 16Kll (CMOS) $2.79 
l{>ans.54Ki1(CM05| $6.95 
1 50ns. 64KX1 (CMOS) $4.95 
IMns.iSeKil $10.95 

150ns. ?S6Kiil $9.95 



62256LP-15 iS0ns.25eKi1 |CMOSI$10.95 




C<rntACt Blnrjlng 
Polnti PoiU Pnu 



JE21 
JE23 
JE24 
JE25 
Je26 
JE27 



3.25 « 2.125 
6.5 1 2.125 
6.5 1 31 25 
S.5I4.25 
6.S75 K 5.75 
7.25x7.5 



400 





830 





T.360 


2 


1.660 


3 


2,390 


4 


3.220 


4 



$4.95 
$0.9S 
$12.95 
$17,95 
$22,95 
$32,95 




Oscilloscope Probes 

' Atter^ualion; xl /xio 
- Capacitance 

(LF18O):ie0pF 
/2ZpF;(LF210): 
40pF / 1 7pF 

LF180 40M Hz Oscilloscope 

ProbB $19.95 

LF2ia lOOMHzOscilfascope 

Probe $29.95 



GolilStar 20MHz Oscilloscope and 
1 GHz Frequency Counter 





• Large 6' rectarrgular display 

• High sensitivity: 1 mV/div 

GS7020 Osdilosmpe $399.95 

- Wide measuring range 

• Measured value iiold function 

FC71 02 Frequency Counter 5299,95 



Metex Digital 
Multimeters 

Qeneriil Sper:$: 

• Handhsld, lilgli 

accuracy - AC/DC 

TOltage. AC'DC 

current, resistance. 

diodes, continuity. 

transistor tiFE 
' Manual ranging w/ 

overtaad prolectaan 
M3SS0. 3650e a M4650 only: 

■ Also measure frequency and capacitarH:e 
M46S0 onlyr - Data hold switcti - 4,5 dignE 

M3$1 35 Digit Multmeier $49.95 

M3650 3.5 Digil MulliinelH nTrequeiKy I 

Caadiance , $69,95 

M36SDB Sanie es M3«S0 wSagrjpii $74.9S 

M4650 4,5 0^]Ti w/FrEqwncy, Capadtanu and 
D3!a Hold Switch $99.95 

Multimeter Specials 

Meo: 

" AC/DC voltage. A(yDG current, resistance, 
diodes, continuity & frequency > FuLI auto- 
rangino on DC voltage » High^low semi- 
auloranging for AC/DC current ar>d ofinns 
- Data hokl switch * Extra-targe display 

M80 3 7SDigll Multunellir $59.95 

M390g: 

■ AC/DC vQiEage, AC^OC current, resistance, 
diodes, continuity, dwell angle and engine 
RPM - High surge voltage protfiction 

M39O0 3,5 Digit Uulkmeier $S9,9S 



Prototype 
Design Stations 



WM2 



WM1 & WMZ Festur«s; • Removatiie sokjerless breadtKiatd 
' Variable and fixed DC power supply * Multi-frequency sig- 
nal generator • Analog multimeter - 8 bJcolor LEDs [tsd & 
green) * a logic switches * Logic probe ■ Lighted power 
switch ■ Fuse overload protected • Sturdy ruggediied 
case 

WM1 Special Features: - 4 potentiometers > Built-in speai<er 

WM2 Special Features: ' Pulse Generator * Binary coded 
decimal (BCD) to 7-segment decoderWriver • DB25 cornedor 
• Frequertcy counter ( 1 Hz to 1 MHz) 

WM1 Analog Prototype Station $199-95 

WM2 Digital Pfototyps Station $249.95 




UVP EPROM Eraser 





A.R.T. EPROM Programmer 



• Programs all current EPROMs in the 2716 to - Erases all EPROM's • Erases 1 chip in 1£ 
27512 range plus the X2e64 EEPROM Win, and 8 cWps in 21 min. • UV intensity 
■ RS232 port ■ Software included 6300 UW/CM^ 

EPP $179.95 DE4 $69.95 

Soldering and Desoldering Stations 

60 Watt Arialcg Oispfay Soldering Statton - Electronic temperature 
comrol from 200' to B78^F . Cartridge heating elentent for a longer 
life of the sotdering tip 

XY1683 , .„$59>95 

60 Watt Analog Display SokJering Station • Electronic temperature 
control from 200^ lo 87B^F * Ceramic lieatmg element for a steady 
temperature and long 3ile xvifift} 

XY2660 $89.95 O 

60 Watt Otgttat Dispiay Soldering Station ■ Electronic temperalure ^ 
control from 200" to S7a'F ' TemperaSure disptayed on easy to r^^"-. ^ 
read .5€'0''H 3-digit LED readout * Nlchrame heating eEemeni In^^ ^B H 

XY960... , , $99.95 || V - *_3 

30 Watt Electronic Temperature Conimlled Desoldering Stalion 

* Electronic temperature control irom 212^ to 842*'F * Sell-contain sd ^ ' 
high rotary vacuum pump 

XY999 $279.95 =<^*" 



51-Piece Electronic Tool Kit 

Ttw MS305 provides the tools needed tor building^ 
repairing and general maintenance of most electronic 
equipment. A convenient end durable carry-along 
comblnetion lock caee safely protects and secures 
this 51 -piece tool kit. Frorrr the digital multimeter to 
the desoldering pump this kit is the perfect item lor 
tftchnlciar>s and electronic flflthuel»8t». 





II]' measuring tape 
Electric tape 
6" long tweezers 
7' brush and scraper 
7" fine point probe 
7" slotted probe 
Rosin cere solder 
30 watt soldering iron 
Desoldering pjtnp 
Soldering stand 



Tools Included in Kit 

• stainless steel scissors 

• Utility components box 

• 8 pes. hex key wrench 

• Digital Multimeter 

• Round needle tile 

• Flat needle file 

• 6" adjustable wrench 
- Utility Itnite v*ith extra blade 

■ Bent needle nose pliers 

■ Diagonal cutting pliers 



• 5.25' needle nose pliers 
■ 6 piece precision 

screwdriver set 
•Brush 
•10 piece screwdriver set: 

5 Slotted & 5 Phillips 

• Flat nose pliers 

• Carrying case: 
17.63"Wx12.5"Dx3.5'( 



MS305 .$119.9 



too 



Partial Listing • Over 4000 Components and Accessories in Stock! • Call for Quantity Discounts 

CIRCLE 114 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



MbiI Ordei Eleclronics-WorldwKJe 



I® 



ameco 



ELECTRONICS 



Request Jameco's 1990 Catalog for a Complete 

Listing of Components, Test/Measurement 

Equipment and Computer Products 



J ameco 20MHz 80386 Desktop Computer Kit 



BM Compatible 

Concurrent 386 (Disk Operating System) 

are [ncijded 

1AM Included. Expardabie lo 8MB on board, 
with optional expansion board 
!QMHz Keyboard Switchabie Operation 
IIOS ROMs included 
p Case w/200 Watt Power Supply 
sr Higti- Performance IDE 3.5" 40MB 
Disk Drive 

1 2MB Floppy DSHD Disk Drfve 
I/O Card with Universal Floppy Controller 
u lOI-Key (Enhanced) Keyboard 




STlDwn with VOA Option {ndl mcludAd) 
JE2059 MulEiscan MofiiCor wi V<3A 



551 2DMHZ 80386 Compatible Kit $1 949.95 



eco IBM 
CT/AT 
ipatible 
Is 



JE1057 






MS 360KBff20KB/1 ZMSyt .44MB Floppy Disk Controliar Card (PC/XT/AT).. $49.95 

J50 Monochrome Graphics Card w/Parallei Printer Port (PC/XT/AT) $49.95 

352 Color Graphics Card w/ Parallel Primer Port (PC/XT/AT) $49.95 

355 EGA Card w/ 256KB Video RAM (PC/XT/AT) $139.95 

057 a^t 6-Bit VGA Card v/l 256KB Video RAM (PC/XT/AT) $199.95 

06O I/O Card wl Serial, Game, Printer Port & Real Time Clock (PC/XT) ... $59.95 

062 RS232 Serial Hall Card (PC/XT/AT) $29.95 

065 I/O Card w/ Serial. Game and Parallel Printer Port (AT) $59.95 

077 Muiti UO Card w/ 360KB/720KB/1 .2MB/t .44MB Fkippy Controller (AT) .. $99.95 



A, VGA & Multiscan Monitor Paclcages 

sys 1 4" EGA monitor and EGA card package 

I X 350 max. resolution) 

1059 EQA Monitor a EGA Card $509.90 

sys 14" Multiscan monitor and 16-blt VGA card 

kage (640 x 480 max. resolution] 

2059 Multiscan Monitor & VGA Card $669.90 

isys 1 4" VGA monitor and 16-bit VGA card package 

X 480 max. resolution) 

2061 VGA Monitor a VGA Card $629.90 




JE2061 



IBM PC/XT/AT 
Compatible Keyboards 



Man 00-Key 
MIcrotype Keyboard 





FK84700 

•201 5 S4-KBy Standard AT Style 

Layout $59.95 

iB47M tOI-Key Enhanced Layout 

with 12 Funclion Keys $69.95 



• IBM PC/XT/ATraee Compatible 

' Saves an ^maring 60% of the dask 

space used by equivalent standard 
keyboards 

MIRU.,.. $129.95 



Jameco 
Digitizer Tablet 




■ AutoCAD 10 template and tour- 
button puck ■ Resolution: up to 
1016 lines per inch * Accuracy: 
t.025" • Emulates three of tile 
worlds most popular fonnats: 
Summagraphics MM, Summa- 
graptiics Bit Pad One. Calcomp 
2000 • EEPROM allows custom 
conrfguration 

JCAD Digitizer Tablet $199.95 
Stylus Two Button Stalls ,...$39.95 

DF! Handy Scanner 

■ IBM PC/XT/AT 

CoiTipatible 
" 4' Scanning 

Window 
■4(X)dpi 

HS3000 $129.95 

Limited Quantity in Stock! 



Logitech 
Mice 





MSER 
MBUS 
MPS2 



StJ'iai Mdu3^ & Mo^HWare 

Sottwa' $89.95 

Maus^ wySus Board & Moi^e- 

WaoSdtHra'c $99,95 

PS/2 Mouse & MousflWare 
Sotw.re $79.95 

Modems 




External Modems 

1200C Diulnwai^Saiu $89.95 

2400C DsiatfOiKS 24ai Saud $149.95 

9600E n»iMtiMs9EOoeii<i $699.95 
Internal Modems 

1200B JanncDl^OOBaiid $49.95 

2400B Jariai?400eaiiil $99.95 

Modems Ii3ied atiovs indutte PiQCrnirn Sott^ra 



IBM 

Compatible 
Cases and 
Power 
Supplies 







JE1010 )V-TiiiSunl>tlt>C^C:i» S39.9S 

JE1D11 SWStarrdaiitPaxrCM $39.95 

JEtOM ^awiePCKt PomiSitMii S$9.$5 

JEt032 KOtaiB^aiiutrSuiiii SKSS 

JEtOas xowtiTPiRvSuim.,,.,,^ $139,95 

JEXtt 1 ukioi Ci» »t»m ph Sistr iSlSSS 

JE2(]i2 un-VMcar CWK31CW IV Si«!tr$t 69,95 

JE201 9 FloTip Sab IkT Cise t8Sj£ 




Floppy 

Disk 
Drives 



Sony 

MPF1 1 3,5' 720KB Di$l( DrivB $69.95 

SMK 5.2S" Installatmn Kit lor MPF1 1 ,,$1 4.95 

Mitsubishi 

MP353B 3 5' 7ZW8 Inurrui Drni> $99.95 

MF35SB 3 5- 1 J4MB Inltmal l>nve.. $119.95 
OOt MF35SB Sfl4twaffr lor £ysl&m£ wilhoul 

1 ul^e disk drive BIOS capability . .. $t4.9S 

Teac 



FD55B 

FD55G 



5 ?5' 36CKS Intflfnai Driva . 
5.?5" 1.ZMB fntornal DiTVB.i 



. $69.95 
. $99.95 



Hard Drives & Tape Back-Up 




MinlScribe (XT-MFM) 

M3425XT SOhtB (63ms| 3.5'HI1 S289.95 

MinlScribe (XT-RLL) 

M8438XT aOMB i6enis)3.5'HH $299.95 

M8450XT 40MB (<6ms| 3 5-HH $369.95 

Conner (AT-IDE) 

CP3044 4HMB (£5ms] 3.5'Lint Pranie $429.95 

CP3184 80HBt25ms)3.5'HH S649.95 

CP3104lMMB(25msl3.5'HH $699.95 

Alxiva Dnvaa tnclticte ttanj Disk Drive, 
Coninpiter i Catiles 

Colorado Memory Systems 

• IBM PC/XT/AT/386 Compatible • Back-up 
40MB in 40 minutes ■ Back-up 60 lo l^OMB 
wittt extended tapes and data compression 
software ■ Includes 40MB tape cartridge 

DJ10 4[1MB Tape Sack Up $329.95 

KE10 Eilarn^ cnddsura Kit S149.95 

TB40 40U B Tif» Cartriilsi J24.9S 

TB60 eOWB Taps Cartridus $32.95 



ameco 



ELECTRONICS 



1355 Shoreway Road, Belmont, CA 34002 

24 Hour Order Hotline 

(415)592-8097 

S50.00 Minimum Ordor 

FAX'S (415) 592-2503 or {4t5) 595£&e4 

TflJex 17&043 - Arw. Back: Jameco BIml 

Data Sheeis - 50c each 

Foir a FREE 4S~?bq9 Risr »r>d $2.00 to covtr 

First Clftss Poftlage and Handling 

C 1990 Jam eco Electronics 9/90 

CA Rflflldflnts Add 

6.25%. 5.75% or 7.25% Sales Tax 
Shipping ^ Add 5% plus Si. 50 Insurance 
ijVay vaiy accardino tc wvignt avi shipping mQ[l^i>tff 
Terms: PricfiiS Subjet^t to diange without notice, 
ltein$ subject to availabilrty zn6 prior sale. 
Complalfr Ie£1 od E-armttWamrviiM a ^wailabl* up&n re<qufisl 



1 mST mmc 



Please 

reler to 

Msll Key 2 

when 
ordering 



ustomer Service •Technical Assistance<Credit Department* All Other Inquiries -(415)592-8097 • 7AM -4PM P.S.T. 

CIRCLE 114 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



m 

13 









10t 



COMPUTERS FOR LE$$ 



10 MHz 8088 System $369 

. 4.77/10 MHz 8088 Motherboard 
. 256 KB RAM (640KB max) 

• 150 Watt Power Supply 

• Roppy Disk Controller 

. One 5.25" 360 KB Roppy Drive 

• MonoGraphics Card w/ Parallel Port 

• 101 Key Enhanced Keyboard 

• Case (3 LEDs ,2 Buttons ,Key-Lxick) 

• 12" Amber Monochrome Monitor 

1 2 MHz 80286 System $669 

■ 12 MHz 80286 Motherboard 

■ Wait State 

. 512 KB RAM (4 MB max) 

• 200 Watt Power Supply 

• Roppy Ksk Controller 

• One 5.25" 1.2 MB Roppy Drive 

• MonoGraphics Card w/ Parallel Port 

• 101 Key Enhanced Keyboard 

• Case (3 LEDs ,2 Buttons ,Key-Lock) 

• 12" Amber Monochrome Monitor 

One Year Parts & Labor Warranty 

30 Day Satisfaction Guarantee 

Shipping & Handling Extra 

VISA & M/C add 3% Amex add 4% 

Price & Availability subject to change 

without prior notice 

JINGO COMPUTERS INC. 

5122 Walnut Grove Avenue 

San Gabriel, CA 91776 

Tel: (818) 309-1108 



CIRCLE 177 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



CABLE TV 
DESCRAMBLERS 



ffiRROLD~ Tri- B i M at. 
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l-rmlin MLD-120O. 

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139.00 

S99.95 

199.95 

199.00 

J99.M 

S18J.00 

SIM.OO 

SI19.95 

CALL 

S350.0O 

SI 40.00 

S13M5 



10 Lot 
K5.00 
SM.OO 
MiOO 
162,00 
JTS.00 
SSS.OO 
Jl 45.00 

sas.oo 

JIOS.OO 

SCilt 

SM5.00 

JIOS.OO 

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*NEW STARGATE 2000 
CABLE CONVERTER 




1-$89.{X) 10-$69.00 100-Call 

Last channel recall-Favorite channel select- 
75 channel-Channel scan-Manual finelune- 
One year warranty -surge protection- HRC & Stand - 
ard switchable- and much more. Call Todtiv! 



INFORMAT!ON(402)554-041 7 

Orders Call Toll Free 
1-800-624-1150 

M.D. ELECTRONICS 
115 NEW YORK MALL 
SUITE 133E 
OMAHA, NE. 68T14 



H.C. 
VISA 

con. 



ADVERTISING INDEX 



S6 

19> 

101 

78 

190 

180 

IKS 

92 

186 

64 

191 

178 

179 



Pacific Cable Q3,96 

Parts Express 96 

Photronics 25 

Pomona Electronics 15 

Radio Shack . , 32 

SCO Electronics 18 

Scncore 8 

Star Circuits 26 

TECI 84 

Tektronix... CV4 

Unicorn 98 

Universal View 96 

U.S. Cable 18 

Viejo Pubticattons 13 

WPT Publications 84 



RADIO-ELECTRONICS does not assume any responsibility for errors that may appear in 
the index below. 



Free Information Number Page 

108 AMC Sales 13 

182 Ace Communications. 15 

75 Ace Products 25 

107 All Electronics 99 

— Amazing Concepts. 92, 97 

84 Appliance Service 25 

67 Banner Teclinical Books 14 

98 Beckman Industrial 13 

109 C&S Sales 24, CV3 

— CBCity 91 

70 CEI 94 

— CIE 11 

50 Caig Laboratories 26 

54 Chemtronics 18 

183 Chencsko Products 25 

— Command Products 17 

— Computer Book Club 5 

58 Cook's Institute !5 

194 D&D Electronics 27 

— Damark International 14 

127 Deco Industries 25 

176 Electronic Goldmine 98 

— Electronic Tecb. Today 67 

— Electronics Book Club 28 

121 Fluke Manufacturing CV2 

189 Global Specialties 3 

— Grantham College 80 

188 HUB Material Company 67 

86 Heatbkit 17 

187 International Components Corp. . 94 

1 14 JamecD 100 

177 Jinco Computers 102 

192 Joseph Electronics 27 

— King Wholesale 92 

193 Loch Ness, Inc 25 

87 MCM Electronics , 95 

181 MD Electronics 102 

93 Mark V. Electronics 97 

— McGraw Hill Book Club 38 

61 Microprocessors Unltd 89 

1 17 Mouser 82 

— NRI Schools 21 , 87 

184 Optoelectronics 23 



ADVERTISING SALES OFFICE 

Gernsback PublicaKons, Inc. 
500 -B Bi. County Blvd. 
Famningdale, NY 11735 
1-(5161 293-3000 
President: Larry Sleekier 
Vice President: Cathy Stockier 

For Advertising ONLY 
516-293-3000 
Fax 1-516-293-3115 
Larry Sleekier 

pubEisher 
AHine Fish man 

advertising director 
Denise Haven 

advertising assistant 
Christina Eetrada 

advertising associate 
Kelly McQuade 

credit manager 

Subscriber Customer Service 

1-800-288-0652 

Order Entry for New Subscribers 

1.800-999-7139 

7:00 AM - 6:00 PM M-F MST 

SALES OFFICES 

EAST/SOUTHEAST 

Stanley Levitan, Eastern Sales Manager 

Radio-Electronics 

259-23 57th Avenue 

Little Neck, NY 11362 

1-71B-42B-6037, !-: 16-293-3000 

Fax 1 -718-225-8594 

MIDWEST/Texas/Arkansas/Okla- 

Ralph Bergen, Midwest Sales Manager 

Radio- Electronics 

540 Frontage Road — Suite 339 

Northfield, IL 60093 

1-708-446-1444 

Fax 1-708-446-8451 

PACIFIC COAST/ Mountain States 

Marvin Green, Pacific Sales Manager 

Radio-Electronics 

5430 Van Nuys Blvd. Suite 31 6 

Van Nuys.CA 91401 

1-618-986-2001 

Fan 1-818-986-2009 



102 CIRCLE 53 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



r 



ELENCO & HITACHI PRODUCTS 
AT DISCOUNT PRICES 



^^^ 



.^^ 



RSOs <Real-Time & Storage Oscilloscopes) From HITACHI 

TTie RSO - its the new solution 

View, Acquire, Test, Transfer ond Document Your Waveform Dorta 



^^h 



4-cnonnel, 10Dt^S/s Model 



Introductory Price 



lOOMS/s (25MS/S on 4 channels simultaneously), lOOMHz. «kw k 1 cti., 2l<w x 2ch., Ikw 1 4ch. VC-61 45 $ 4,695,00 



CompacI, Full Feature Models 



40M&S. 100MHz. 4lcw X Ich., 2kw x 2cti. VC-6045 i 3,049.00 

20MS/5. 50MHz. 2kw x 2cf). VC-6025 $ 2,293.00 



Compact Series Scopes 




Low Cost/High Value Models 



20MS/S, SOMHz, 2kw i Jch VC-6024 S 2,049.00 

20MS/S. 20MHz, 2kvy I 2cM, VC-6023 $1,749.00 

BSOs from HHaohi feature sucli tunclions as roil mode, averaging, saivs memory, stnoothing, interpolation, pretrigga ring, 
cursor measurements, plotter intarfaco, and RS-332C Interface. WHh the comfort of analog and Ihe power of digital. 

v-212 Hitachi Portable Scopes 

$435 ^'^ *° SOMHz, 2-Ctiannet, DC offset 
DC w 20MHz function, Altemote magnifier function 

Dvai Charinel ^-525 CRT Readout, Cursor Meas, $1 .025 
V-523 Delayed Sweep $995 
V-522 Basic Modal $895 




V-422 40MHz Dual Trace $795 

20MHz Elenco Os cilloscope 

$375 



Delayed Sweep 
LighlBaigtu (13ltjs) 
2mV Sens 
3 Yr Warranty 

Model V- 1065 
Shown 

This series provides many new functions such as CRT 
Readout, Cursor measurements (V-1 085/1 065/665), 
Frequency Ctr (V-1085), Sweeptime Autoranging and 
Trigger Lock using a 6-inch CRT, You don't feel the 
compactness in terms of performance and operation. 

V-660 60MHz Dual Trace Jl,195 

V-665 eOUHz Dual Trace w/Cursor $1 ^45 

V-1060 100MHz Dual Trace $1,425 

V-1065 100MHz Dual Trace w/Cursor (1,695 

V-1085 100MHz QuadTracew/Cursor $2,045 

V-1100A 100MHz QuadTracew/Cursor $2,295 

V-1150 150MHz QuadTracew/Cursor $2,775 




It40-1251 

• Dual Trace 

• Cemponenl Tester 
. 6- CRT 

• X-y Operation 

• TV Sync 

• 2 p-1 ProlJes 



FREE DMM 

with purchase of 
ANY SCOPE 



SCOPE PROBES 

P-l 65MHz, l)(,1Qx S19.95 
P-2 lOOMHz, 1x, lOx S23.95 



Elenco 35MHz Dual Trace * en- 
Good to somhz ^4S5 

MO- 1252 

• High luminance 6" CRT 

• IntVSensitivily 

• 6KV Acceleration Voltage 

• tons Rise Time 

• X-Y Operation ■ 7 Axis 
_^ - , .. ,„ ,_ • E)elay8d Triggering Sweep 

•l**JL%.^..i_'l^' • Includes 2 P-1 Probes 




All scopes include probes, schematics, operators manual, and 3 year {2 yrs for Elenco scopes) world wide warranty on parts & latwr. Many accessories available for all 
Hitachi scopes. Call or write for compfete specifications on these and many other fine oscilloscopes. 



WE NOW 

CARRY 

COMPLETE LINE 

OF 

FLUKE 

MULTIMETERS 
Models 

21F 83 
23F B5 
25F 87 
27F 8050A 
73 B060A 
75 8062A 
77F + More 
CALL FOR 
SPECIAL PRICING 




True RMS 4 1/2 

Digit Muttinr)eter 
M-7000 

$135 

.0J% ex: Accuracy 
.1% Resistance 

with Freq. Counter 
and deluxe case 



Function Generator 
Blox 

#9600 



fm.* 



$28.95 



provides sine, trianula, square 

wave from iHi to 1MHz 

AM or FM capability 



□SBB 



10 Function 
Multimeter 
/ I Cfwl-365 

: ' $65 

AC 4 DC Voltage L Amps 

^ ,■- Resistance lo 2(X)DM£1 

i" , - DioiJe, Logic. * Trans lest 

^^H Capadtance lo 200uF 



Digital Capacitance Meter 

imm>. CM' 1550 
$58.95 

d Rargas 

.1pf-2C},OO0ufd 

.5% bsslc accy 

Zero control 

with casfl 




Triple Power Supply XP-620 

Assembled $65 



L<4* 



» » 



Kit $45 

21o15VallA. 

■2 to -15V all A 

tor4tcS0Vat1A) 

and 5V at SA 

Contains all ihe desired lealuies for doing experments. 

Features short cirouil prelection, all supplies. 




H^ 



Digital LCR Meter 

LC-1M1 

$125 

Measures; 

Colls 1UH-200H 

Caps .1pf-20Oul 

Ras.01 20M 



Wide Band Signal Generators 

SS-9000 




$129 



RFFreq1[»K-460MHz 

AM Modulation oflKHz 

Variable RP output 

SG-95O0 w Digital Display and tSOMHz built-in Counter $249 




AC Current Meter 
ST-1010 

$69.95 

1CO0 Amps 
Data &P«aK hold 

S Functiofis 
DflJuxfi Case 



^y» ^^ ^^F 



Decode Blox 

"■r#9610or 
#9620 

$18.95 

tgei Resistor Sloi 

47i*mlo1M&100Kpot 

#9620 Capacitor Bloi 

47plto10MFD 



Quad Power Supply 



XP-580 
$59.95 




Fully regulated an3 short circuil protected 

XP-575 wittiout meters $39.95 



LEARN TO BUILD AND PROGRAM 
COMPUTERS WITH THIS KITI 

INCLUDESi All Parti. Auamtriy and Lsiton Manual 

Model 
MM-8000 
$129.00 



Digital Triple Power Supply 




XP-765 
$249 

O-20V a[ 1A 

20V al 1A 

SValSA 



Fuly regulated. Slion circuit prolecled with 
2 litr'A control, 3 separate supplies 

XP-WO With Analog Meters $175 



GF-80 16 Function Generator 

with Freq. Counter 

$249 

Sina, Square, Triangle 
Pulse, Ramp, .2\QZUhz 
Freq CounEer ,1 - 10MHz 

GF'6015 without Fr«q. Meter $179 





Starting from scratch you t>utld a compleiiQ system. Our Micro-Mastef 
trainer te>adids you to writ^Hito RAMs. ROMsandojna^DSS microproces- 
sof. which OSes similaf inachiw langiuafle as IBM PC, Yov *ill wrta (he 
initial instmctkins ta toU ihe 3085 processor to fUi sQned and stor^ these 
instructions in penrarwnt memoFy in a 2816 E PROM. Toadios you aJf 
about input and OLJtput ports, cocriputer ihnniDrs. Buikt your own keyboard 
and tBdin how Ed scan keyboard and disp>lay. IVo previous computer 
knowledge required, Sirripte easy to understand instniccion leaches you 
to write in mat^ine langi>ag>e. 

ROBOTICS KIT FOR ABOVE (MM-e010> |71,95 



WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD! P & S SALES INC ""^ °^^ Money Back Guarantee 

UPS Shipping: 48 states 5% ^=fcg^ 1245 Rosewood. Deerfield. IL 60015 2 Year Warranty ^-oes s^b.^c t„ c..., 
($10 Max) IL Res., 7% Tax C±?^^S (800) 292-7711 (708> 541-0710 WRITE FOR FREE CATALOG 



CIRCLE 109 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 







On the line, on the bench, 
or on the road. The low- 
cost solution is Tek. 

Do you debug the design? Verify the production run? Service the 
finished produa' Then for low-cost solutions built for your application, 

- ..^ ,-,- -I there's only one place to go, 

^jj iTt^,'! _|||^_ ^ ^^^^ 2^^ Series oscilloscope 

|h^99;j ~ family. 

i VBSB i ' y S - I There are ten scopes in the 2200 

' ' -^i^^^^^H^H^^M. (Q $5495. And three of them demon- 
strate fanctional power at its best: 
the 100 MHz 2232, 50 MH2 
2211, and 100 MHz 2245A. 
If you can't afford to 
miss a thing, get the 

" 2232 digital storage 

oscilloscope. 
With 100 MS/s sampling, ten nanosecond glitch 
capture, waveform cursors, a 4K record length 
and 3OK of battery-backed memory, it makes 
routine work of problems other scopes can't even see. 

For the best performance value in digital storage, try the Tek 221 1. 
It offers a standard hardcopy interface, measurement cursors, 20 MS/s 
sampling and a 4K record length per channel, plus digital/analog ope- 
ration — all for only $2695. 

And for the ultimate in low-cost troubleshooting: 
the $1995 2245A. It's a 100 MHz real-time scope 
with auto setup, cursors, four independent channels, 
dual time bases and more. 

So if you want the best low-cost soluticm on the 
line, on the bench, or on the road with you, just get 
on the phone. 

And call your local Tek representative today. 

Tt'« An IK PLirchase a 2232, 221 1, or 2245A by October 15, 

11 » Ull U3. 1990 and you can receive a $345 digitai 

multimeter free!* 

The CDM250 measures 
current, voltage and resistance, 
has overload proteciion and is 
UL certified. To get yours, contact 

your local representative or distributor and place your order with 

Option 4X. Or call Tek direct at: 

1-800-426-2200 Ext. 225 










■m DBktronix 



COMMfrreo TO EXCeuJ^CE 



CIRCLE 92 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

'Offer valid in U.S. only. You must ask for Option 4X 
and date purchase order between July 15 and 
October 15, 1990 to quallf>-. 

© 1990 Tektronix Inc. BOB-101 



»mt